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SPORTING NOTES.

|By "Fetlock."] Owners are reminded that nominations for the Waipukurau and Petaue meetings on the 24th and 26th instant are due this and to-morrow evenings. The following sums are required to be lodged at the Tavistock Hotel, Waipukurau, by 4 p.m. to-day :— Handicap Hurdles,. 1 soy ; Birthday Handicap, 2 soys ; Corinthian Handicap, 1 soy ; and District Handioap, 1 soy. The amounts for Petane must be in the hands of the secretary at the Petane Hotel by 8 p.m. to-morrow:— Handicap Hurdle Race, 1 soy ; The Bridge Handicap, 1 soy ; and Flying Stakes Handicap, 1 boy. We have received the result during the past week of two of the most fashionable races in the Old Country. The result of the Two Thousand Guineas must have surprised a few, for according to the latest mail Scotfree was not mentioned in the betting. He is owned by Mr John Foy, and i 3 by Macgregor out of Celibacy, and made his first appearance on the turf last season under the name of Donald 11. He was placed in his two first races, but on his name being changed he won the Great Sapling Stakes, of 989 soys, at Sandown Park. Macgregor, the Bire of Scotfree, pulled off the Two Thousand Guineas in 1870, but failed to win the Derby, the Epsom Gradient proving too much for him, and aa most of his stock inherit his] rather longish legs, I do not expect to see Scotfree returned the winner of the Blue Ribbon. Mr Gerard's St. Medard was placed second. He was sired by Hermit, and is out of a dam by the New Zealand Stud Company's Musket. St. Medard, as a two-year-old, started six times, and won the Maiden Plate at the Newmarket Second October meeting and the Monday Nursery Handicap at the Newmarket Houghton meeting; two other events he ran second; and in two was unplaced. Lord Falmouth's Harvester, who was third horse, is by Sterling out of Wheatear. He was certainly the best performer of the three placed horses last season, having won the Thirty-sixth Triennial Produce Stakes at the Newmarket First October Meeting, and the Clearwell Stakes at the Newmarket Second October Meeting, besides running second to Superba for the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket. In the One Thousand Guineas the reverse to a "boil-over" occurred, Lord Falmouth's Busybody having been backed to win this" event to a very large amount. Last season Busybody divided with Superba the title of best filly. She is wonderfully handsome, small, but quality all over, and not lacking in power as much aB her size would suggest. She comes from running blood on both sides, her sire Petrarch (from whom she inherits her splendid quality) being the winner of the Two Thousand Guineas, St. Leger, and the Priuce of Wales' Stakes, Ascot, in 1876, the Middle Park Plate in 1875, besides winning the Ascot Rous Memorial Stakes and Ascot Gold Cup in 1877 and 1878 respectively. Spinaway (dam of Busybody) won the One Thousand Guiueas and Oaks in 1875. Busybody ran in four races last season, winning three, value £3895, and was beaten by The HermitAdelaide filly (Solitaire) for the Dewhurst Plate, giving the winner 31b. Queen Adelaide, who ran second t© Busybody in the One Thousand last week, is not named among the entries for this race, but is probably the filly by Statesman — Queen Mary, who did not run last season. Lord Bradford's Whitelock, by Wenlock — White Heather, got in third. She ran on three occasions last season, winning the Prince of Wales' Stakes at Goodwood and thf. Poßt Sweepstakes at Newmarket, and running third in the Rous Memorial Stakes at the Newmarket First October Meeting, won by Busybody. Ia mentioning Harvester and Busybody I have stated that they are owned by Lord Falmouth, but that gentleman intended that they should all be sold before these two events were run. The following explanation is made by " Phteton " iv reference to my remarks seeking the cause why Necklace was allowed to run in the Mares' Produce Stakes afc Auckland recently : — " A Press Association telegram from Napier contains (ho following: 'Local sports are much puzzled at Necklace, described as hy Musket— Locket winning the Mares' Produce Stakes, seeing that the official programme of the Auckland Club, containing all entries up to August, 1883, mentions no such filly.' Prior to the receipt of the above, I had myself noticed the omission of Necklace's name, and on inquiring of. Mr Percival I was informed that her omission in the official programme from the list of horses engaged was caused by a misprint, the name of Lyra being printed instead of that of Locket. It appears that both mares were nominated by Mr Fergusson for the stake. The former proved empty, but from a perusal of tbe entry-book I found that the produce of Locket was duly described aa a brown filly, by Musket." The only remark I wish to make on the above is that the omission or misprint should have been made more generally known, thereby saving a good deal of perplexity to those interested. Le Grand, on the last day of the Australian Jockey Club meeting at Randwiok, again proved himself superior to our New Zealand bred colt Martini-Henry. In the A.J.C. Plate, of 350 soys, 3 miles, weight-for-age, with a field of five, Le Grand got home first by a length, in the fast time of smin 30|-3ec, the consistent Sardonyx being second, Sweet William third, Martini-Henry fourth, and Pell Mell fifth. The following is a short account of the race :— Pell Mell lead past the stand twice, followed by Sweet William, Lb Grand, Sardonyx, and MartiniHenry. Sweet William took up the running at the back of the course and led up the hill by two lengths, Martini next pulling hard, Le Grand third, Sardonyx fourth, Pell Mell having fallen back beaten. At the home turn Martini and Le Grand took up the running from Sweet William, but Martini tiring at the distance, the great gun shook him off, and then stalling off a well-timed run on the part of Sardonyx, won cleverly by a length. Body M'lvor, at one time owner of Loch Lomond, Grey Momus, &c , and whose form in the Zetland spots was well-known on our racecourse, received a severe shaking while riding Fearnaught in a steeplechase ab Dowling Forest, Victoria. His horse fell at a fenoe, and in so doing Fearnaught broke his neck. Iv running off the dead heat for the Nur- ■ scry Plate at the recent A.J.C. meeting, Lord Exeter beat the Hon. J. White's filly lolanthe by a length and a half. The intended match for £1000 aside between the filly and Mr Cooper's colt Buckingham did not come off. Mr Cooper forfeited 500 soys. Some idea of the magnitude of English and French racing establishments may be gleaned on perusal of th 9 following. The Duke of Hamilton's racehorses number 50 head, of which 22 are two-year-olds, in charge of Richard Marsh; Lord Rose, berry's, 33 head, in charge of Joseph Cannon; Duke de Castries', 49 head, in charge of Tom Carter ; Mr H. Jenninos' 38 head ; Mr| H? DelamarreV, 34 head ; Baron de Rothschilds', 38head ; Count de Jeune and d'Arenberg'e, 47 head. Le Grand's two-year-old sister has been christened Lady Bell. She is said to be " a perfect picture." The black-balling of two English bookmakers — Messrs Wallace and Westbrook — by TafctersaU's Club has been very freely commented on in Sydney, and the whole question is being debated in sporting circles on the other side. It appears that the firm referred to has a big Sydney ready-money connection, and that, on making application .to be registered as bookmakers by Tattersall's Club (for whioh privilege, by the way, they would have to pay £50 apiece), they were pro-

posed and seconded but were ultimately black-balled. The Neto Zealand Times states tkat a movement is on foot to form a jockey club in the Castiepoint district. Mr Cavanagh, a purchaser for horses for India, informs a Wairarapa paper that he has travelled from Wanganui to Masterton without beiug able to pick up a single horse suitable for his requirements. All doubts (says "Vigilant") as toi which is the crack three-year-old of the season should now be set at rest for ever. Le Grand is far and away the greatest colt we have seen eir.ee the days of First King, and, unless I err very much, Mr James Wilson has two in his stable— Off Color and Little Sister — either of whom could beat Martini- Henry. The best hoi&e in Australia at the present moment (ateo says "Vigilant") is one who has never won a race here. Sir Modred is one of the most difficult animals in the colonies to prepare, and has given his trainer, Alsopp, more trouble than any other animal under his I care. He is fitter now than he ever was I before, and in about another month, all going well, will win a big race. This ia [ worth making a note of. 1 The late Count de Lcgrange's racing cups were disposed of in Paris lately. The Goodwood a* d Ascot cups won by Gladiateur and Monarque only fetched £68 each, although they were valued at £300 apiece. Giadiateur's bit and bridle was sold for £21, ancl a painting of him was purchased by the French Jockey Club for £97. Favo, the winner of tbe Sydney Cup, is not quite such a bad bred animal as one would be led to imagine by reading some of the critique; on his performance, he being by The Drummer out of Romping Girl. Mr W. A Long purchased him a few weeks back, tho price paid being £200. Mr Long is a better judge of horseflesh than to give such a sum for a mere hack. Favo was certainly not much thought of in the race, but lhis event so often occurs in most of tho big handicaps (lhe Melbourne Cup, to wit) that I fail to sea why it should call foith so much twaddle on the present occasion. Favo's price at the post was 100 to 5, for which he was backed to win several thousands. I might mention that Favo is a full brother to Masquerade, the Metropolitan Stakes winner.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18840508.2.13

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6853, 8 May 1884

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1,718

SPORTING NOTES. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 6853, 8 May 1884

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