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Hawke's Ban Herald. THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1878.

It is becoming daily more manifest that in undertaking to carry out a system of free national education, the State has accepted a much heavier charge than was at first imagined. Looking back at the vote of last session for school buildings, and comparing it with what the expei'ience of the last six months has shown to be the requirements of the country in that respect, one cannot help a feeling of surprise at the extraordinary famount of ignorance of the subject which the Legislature displayed. It seems wonderful, too, that unassisted by data of any kind, without the slightest attempt having been made to gather information as to the probable cost, Parliament should have entered into an engagement involving expenditure of the limits of which they had no knowledge whatever. But this is the way that legislation is carried on in this country in almost all things. The principal part of the time is passed in party conflict and personal recrimination, and then, when the session is drawing to a close, the business of the country is hurried over with a haste that of necessity prevents proper attention being paid to it. No better instance can be cited than the education vote. The sum voted for school buildings throughout the colony was £50,000, an amount so preposterously inadequate as to prove that it was set down without the faintest knowledge of what the requirements were. In this district alone the amount that was needed for buildings which were absolutely indispensable if public education was to be carried on, was not less than £13,000 or £14,000, and as other districts were similarly circumstanced, it is easy to perceive how far the £50,000 would go. The sum was evidently named at hazard, the Ministers know no more as to how far it would go than the man in the moon. To a great extent, also, there was similar guess work in the vote for maintenance, but this was perhaps excusable, considering that the estimate was based upon quite a rough calculation of the number of children of school age in the colony, and there were no reliable statistics which would furnish correct information on the point.

But it was not alone in the financial part of the matter that absence of knowledge and want of preparation were manifested, there was besides a mistiness that enshrouded the Government, Parliament, and all concerned, as to the mode of working the Act. Whether things would have been clearer had there not been a change of Ministry it is difficult to say. Possiblehad Mr Bowen remained in office he might have been able to shed light upon the course that was to be pursued, seeing that he introduced the bill. But it is much more likely that the four corners of the Act contained all he had worked up on the subject, and that such details as would " be necessary for the proper carrying out of the system were left for subsequent consideration. The result, naturally enough, was that month after month passed without much being done, and even now, more than six months after the Act came into force, the system is only in an incipient state. It is really a shame and a disgrace that in a matter of such largo importance to the whole community legislation should have been so crude. One would have thought that before attempting to introduce a system of public education the fullest information would have been laid before Parliament, on all points connected with the working of such a system elsewhere, as well as upon what our requirements were likely to be. How do we know that the system as we are having it is the best form 1 It seems cumbrous and expensive enough ;in all conscience, and may possibly ihave to give way to something more | simple and less costly. It is plain enough that the question in its entirety will have to be well considered in the approaching session, and it is to be

hoped that any conclusions that may be arrived at will have for theiv basis information of wider rango than was brought to bear when tho Education Acfc was passed.

We are exceedingly glad that the suggestion wo made last Monday has been adopted by the Corporation. We expressed the opinion that a special meeting of the Municipal Council should bo called forthwith, and something like an inclination shown to comply with tho genoral wish of the ratepayers for the immediate reclamation of the swamp. A special general meeting of the Council has been called for to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock, when the question of swamp reclamation will be considered among other business. We are convinced the members of tho Council will discuss the question in a fair spirit, and with a conscientious regard to the right discharge of the duties the burgesses have entrusted them with. Still, though wo disclaim any idea of dictating the course they should pursue, we would point out to them that in matters largely affecting the interests of the represented the representatives arc expected to follow out tho wishes of their constituents, even if in doing so the representatives have to yield their own opinions to some extont. And this is just such a case. The ratepayers consider that the filling in of the inner swamp is urgently needed, and this has been so pointedly and clearly expressed that the Council have no alternative but to put the work in hand at once. We trust, therefore, that something practical in that direction will be dono to-morrow, thereby furnishing a convincing proof that the Councillors are worthy of the confidence the burgesses of Napier/ have reposed in them.

Just before G o'clock last evening there was an alarm of fire. Both engines were promptly turned out, but there was fortunately no need for their services, as the cause of the alarm was merely a chimney of Mr Boylan's having caught fire. "We learn that when the steam fir© engine was brought out from the station there were only two men to draw it ; one citizen gave help, but several others who stood by, and were called upon to assist, would not give any aid. As it turned out their churlishness was of no cansequence, but had there been a tiro of serious extent the conduct of these inert people might have cost the town deal*. We hear that Sir Beetham intends giving his decision in the telegram case on Friday morning. The case in question, which was heard on Friday last, was for the recovery of one shilling as payment for a telegram sent from Dunedin which was not marked " collect " through a mistake in transmitting it. We are requested to state that the illuminated address presented last evening to Major Withers can be seen during the whole of to-day at the Albion Hotel. The football team which has been chosen to represent Napier in the match against Gisborne will leave to-night by the steamer Fairy. Players are requested to meet at 7 o'clock at Mr Gollop's hotel, Spit. The following are the names of the team; — Messrs W. L. Rees (captain), Bloomfield, Caldwell, A. E. Dewes, H. Gibbons, A. Monteith, G. Ridings, J. B. Rhodes, L. Von Tempsky, 0. T. Philiing, Hickson, Freeman, G. Ormond, Kettle, E. Tanner, L. Grace, F. Kennedy, and R. Von Tempsky. We learn by private telegram that the weather at Gisborne is all that can be desired for the match, which takes place to-morrow (Friday). The only business at the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday morning consisted of one inebriate being brought up and fined in the usual manner. The Napier Artillery Cadets and Engineers are ordered 'to parade at 7 o'clock to-night, in order to take part in the Fire Brigade demonstration, which takes place to-day. The programme appeared in yesterday's Herald. Miss Lydia Howarde, so well known to Napier audiences, appears to be gaining laurels in Melbourne. "Tahite," in the Australasian of the 6th inst., says: — " Miss Lydia Howarde has been in New Zealand a good deal, but it will be remembered she was in Melbourne several years ago, and was fast making herself a favorite with the public. She is not only no less a most capable actress and agreeable vocalist than she was formerly, but she has that sort of pleasantly compact appearance which abundantly satisfies even exacting requirements. She dresses with rare taste, elegantly, and without a spice of extravagance or meretriciousness. And she gaily tripped through the part of a Prince, Fritz by name. She sang several old songs in a way to revive most pleasantly old memories, and she sang some new ones not less agreeably. For my part, therefore, I trust she is going to stay with us, and not going away any more. " Referring to the probability of Mr Walter Johnston resigning his seat in the House as member for Manawatu, the Times of Saturday last says : — "Although, as far as we know, Dr Buller has as yet made no public assertion that he seeks to represent this county in Parliament, we have it on the best authority that he has taken time by the forelock in the endeavor to woo the sweet votes of the electors. He arrived in Palmerston by the morning train on Thursday, and before midday a canvass had been commenced, our informant being amongst the solicited. From what we have learned within' the last few days, we fear that unless some very strong pressure is brought to bear upon the present member, there is very little chance of the worthy doctor, or any one else, writing M.H.R. after his name, at least during the next session. Mr Johnston has determined that there shall bo no vacancy for Manawatu, and it seems very like as if Mr Johnston was master of the situation." A new theatre has just been completed at Nelson. The opening performance look place on Thursday last, when it was estimated there were nearly 1000 people present. Amongst the \ vocalists who assisted on the occasion were two gentlemen, Messrs Shand and Gilpin, who, if we mistake not, have frequently been heard in Napier. They sang in the duet, "Larboard Watch," and Mr Gilpin afterwards gave the do- J scriptive song, " Wrecked and Saved," singing as an encore, " When we were boys together." The prologue was read by Mr Neville Thornton, who was also here with the Baker and Farron troupe. The West Coast Times relates that a Chinaman, name unknown, was sharp enough to get on the blind sido of the Union Bank one day last week. It appeai'3 that a small parcel of gold of an ounce or two in weight had just been sold to the bank, when "John" entered to dispose of a similar lot. The parcel iirst ! purchased was not emptied from the scales, and the gold buyer gave the second seller the bonelifc in weight and value of the first parcel as well as his own. The Chinaman was too cute to point out the error, but quietly pocketed the full amount tendered him, and now Detective Browne has his own work cut out to discover his man. It is said that the "Heathen Chinee" and his mates have since had a re-union, when poultry and ! fan tan, together with the banking facilities of the colony, were most liberally discussed, the solemn meeting terminating on tho mutual understanding of "no savoe." One of the Celestial brethren, is reported to have saluted the detective officer with "Done Brown," while another I kept adding to the aggravation by playing on his banjo, " I know a bank."

A resident surgeon of the Dunedin Hospital is advertised for at a salary of £300 a year. Applications are invited until September .Ist for the appointment of senior pilot at Bluff Harbor at a salary of £300 a year. Mr Coppin, tho well-known actor, in the course of a speech made on the occasion of a presentation to Miss Soldene at her farewell performance in Melbournei said : — " You are perhaps not aware that I enjoy the reputation of black-mailing every artist of celebrity who Visits the Australian colonies. Upon many occasions the term has been Vised in its most offensive sense, implying that I attempt to rob and extort money. Now, ' the very head and front of my offending hath this extent, no moro. ' Tho colonies are visited by a great number of stars, who as a rule take largo sums of money away with them, whilst others are unsuccessful and require assistance to take them homo again. I simply solicit tho support of those who can afford to give money or their services for tho relief of tho poor and distressed mcmbors of their own profession. Ido so under tho conviction that it is the duty of tho rich to assist tho poor, and I am inclinod to think that if this principle were more generally carried out it would greatly increase the happiness of our small community." . Tho Duvalli sisters and Val Vose were passengers to Sydney by the last Californian mail steamer. Tho Times, in a review of Trollope's " South Africa," refers to New Zealand as now being England's "pot colony." ! ; The following intensely American paragraph is from a New York paper : — Julia A. Moore, "tho sweet singer of Michigan," is giving readings in her native State. Drossed precisely as she appears in the picturo on tho cover of her book, with wildly llnwing hair and a pasto-board crown, she comes on to the stage and reads in a dolorous whine her own productions, "which speak of being killed, died, or drowned." At every place she visits tho hall is crowded till there is not standing room left ; and by the time the " sweet singer " has concluded her recitations, her audience is in a wild uproar of laughter. A full brass band usually adds to the attraction of the evening, and at tho close this band suddenly fetches up with a tremendous snort or toot, the whole scone being indescribably ludicrous. Just before the House of Commons was prorogued at Ottawa the other day, Mr Donald Smith, of Selkirk, rose to make explanations relative to the lease of the Pembina Branch .Railway, and to deny several charges that had been made against him by the Opposition. Quite a scene of excitement ensued, Sir John Macdonald and Dr Tupper loudly denying all the statements the hon. member was making. In his vindication, Hon. Mr Tupper was several times called to order, and Messrs Smith and Tupper were engaged hi a personal controversy, when Black Bod knocked at the door, Dr Tupper shouting "coward," "mean, treacherous coward," across the floor, while the Sergeant-at-Arms was waiting to announce the arrival of his Excellency's messenger. Black Rod ultimately got a chance to deliver his message, and the Speaker, preceded by the Sergeant-at-Arm, was walking towards the door, when another scene of indescribable confusion occurred. Sir John Macdonald and Dr Tupper, and a number of other Conservative members, gathered round Mr Smith, and every description of fiery epithet was hurled at the hon. member for Selkirk. The exit of the Speaker was barred by the throng of persons at the door, and the noise and tumult increasing, the Sergeant-at-Arms was directed to arrest the disorderly members. It was impossible for the Sergeant to execute this order owing to the great confusion which prevailed. The leaders of the riot suddenly awoke to the fact that they stood in danger of being arrested, and they cooled down somewhat and allowed the Speaker to proceed to the Senate Chamber. The speech from the Throne congratulates the country on the fact that the Dominion now includes all the provinces of British North America save that of Newfoundland, alludes to the running of the boundary line between Alaska and British Columbia, and to the rapid settlement of Manitoba and the North-west Territories. In conclusion, his Excellency announced that he would shortly retire from the position of Go-vernor-General.

The state of the colony when the Constitution Act was proclaimed, and the relative numbers of the Aboriginal and European population, then and now, is thus referred to iii the N&io Zealand Times of Friday : — The original number of members returned to the House of Representatives at the first meeting of the General Assembly was thirty-seven : it is now eighty-eight. The European population in the North Island was estimated at 18,000 souls, whilst the natives were supposed to number 70,000. The European population in the South Island at that time was very small ; probably 30,000 would represent the whole in both islands. In twenty-seven years the increase has been immense ; the last census returns give 414,000 as the total European population in March of the present year." : Mr Nehemiah Guthridge, a very old colonist, and some years ago a very prominent citizen of Melbourne, died on Thursday, June 27, at Emerald-hill. He came to the colony (says the A ustralasian) about 1842, and in the course of a few years amassed a large fortune. He identified himself with public life at an early period of his colonial career, and was for several years a member of the Melbourne City Council, and he also represented the Central Province for a considerable time. He and the late W. Nicholson were among the first promoters of the Hobson's Bay Railway Company, and, we are informed, bore the preliminary expenses of the survey out of their own pockets, though they were subsequently recouped by the company. Mr Guthridge also made large advances in connection with the Ballarat and Geelong railway contract, and sustained serious reverses in consequence, which almost crippled his resources. He then went to Sale, where ho re-entered into business with fairly successful results. He again took a leading part in municipal matters, and was elected mayor of Sale on several occasions. He was a man of high integrity and uprightness of character, and won the esteem and respect of all with whom he came in contact. He was a prominent member of the Wesleyan denomination, both in Melbourne and in the country. His remains were interred in the Melbourne Cemetery on Saturday.

The sugar industry both in Queensland and New South Wales is in a prosperous condition, tho season having been ail that could have been wished. The weather during this month of June (says the Adelaide correspondent of the Melbourne Argus) has been gloriously wet for the farmers, but dreadfully sloppy for us townsfolk. All the country districts have been visited by heavy rains, and following, as they have done, a very favorable seeding time, the prospects of the agriculturists could not be more promising. But while our country friends are rejoicing we are grumbling, for it is years since the streets were in such a plight as they are now in. The demand for land continues unabated. Last month the farmers selected over 60,000 acres, for which they gave' an average of over two guineas per acre, while for township and suburban lands there is a constant and ready sale, the chief purchasers being town residents, who, owing to the depression of the mining markets, find no outlet but land for the investment of their money. In May, 1331- acres °* country township lands were sold at the high average of £203 6s per acre. This is all very well for the coffers of the State, but I am afraid it won't in the majority of instances leave muoh margin for the speculators.

A telegram was published the other day in the Sydney Morning Herald to the effect that " Mr G. M. Reed, one of the proprietors of the Otado Daily Times, will probably be called to the tJpper House. " There was of course a good deal of astonishment at this, and the Otago Daily Times hastens to explain, by publishing the following letter from Mr M'Carthy, of the Press Agency, at Wellington : — " My dear Reed, — A very absurd telegram appears in the Sydney Morninfi Herald of July 3. It speaks of the probability of you being called to the Upper House ; not that there is anything so very absurd in that; but when one reflects that the person mentioned was Rewi, I tremble to think of the mistakes that may, be made occasionally. The whole telegram had reference to the Waitara meeting, and it concluded with the sentence, ' Rewi will probably be called to the Tapper House.' How the deuce the decipherer managed the rest of it I am at a loss to divine. — Yours, &c, F.M'Cahthy." The Fiji Argus of June 14 states that the barque M*enschikoff, which arrived from Rotuamh on Tuesday, June 11, reports that a very determined war is raging in the island between the Wesleyan and Roman Catholic native converts, and that groat numbers on both sides have been killed. They have good firearms, but, it is thought, not much powder. They are forming forts and barricades oixt of cocoanut trees. Just before the vessel sailed a correspondent saw twelve men lying in a house horribly wounded. They j had been shot in a fight the day previous, and there were no means of alleviating their sufferings, no medical man being on the island. There are only seven whites on the island, who are threatened with death if they interfere. The Wesleyana will probably get the best of it, as they far outnumber the Catholics. The Rev. J. U. S pence will preach at Porangahau on Sunday at 11 a.m., and at Wallingford at 3.30 p.m. Mr H. F. Wilson will preach at Woodville at 11 a.m., and at Tahoraite at 3.30 p.m. The Rev. R. Fraser will preach at Waipukurau at 11 a.m., at Kaikora at 3 p.m., and at Waipawa at 7 p.m.

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Bibliographic details

Hawke's Ban Herald. THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1878., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 5136, 25 July 1878

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Hawke's Ban Herald. THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1878. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 5136, 25 July 1878

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