Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Hawke's Bay Herald SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1868. ELECTION OF A NATIVE MEMBER.

Wednesday last, the 15th instant, was the day fixed for the election of a native or half-caste to represent the East Coast native district iv the House of Representatives. The proceedings were taken under the provisions of the Native Representation Act of last session. At the appointed hour, although the rain fell iv torrents, a large number of natives were assembled outside the Government buildiugs. G-. 8. Cooper, Esq. officiated as returning officer, and the result, as detailed below, was the election of Tareha. Upon the fact being announced, a truly English " hip hip hurrah" burst from the throats of that chiefs friends, and the meeting was brought to a close. It is exceedingly difficult to see how this new element in the representation will work — how the native members are to compreheud what goes ou in the House ; how they are to be sufficiently enlightened upon every question to enable them to give their vote ; how — but the category of difficulties is really without end. Many think, indeed, that the whole proceeding will be barren of result, and that a considerable expenditure has beeu incurred to no purpose. But we would remind those who so think that the natives, in common with other consumers, are large taxpayers, and that to confer upou them the boon of representation, even if it be at first a mere form, is to carry out a great principle, one for which Englishmen have more than once fought and bled. The following is a translation of the report of the proceedings written for the Waka Maori. It supplies the speeches, which of course we could not pretend to give : — On the 15th day of April instant the natives assembled at Napier, in accordance with the arrangements made and lately published, by which that day was appointed as a nomination day for the election of a native member for the General Assembly of the Government of New Zealand. The day was a very wet one, but nevertheless the attendance was large — so much so that there was barely room for men to move about, from the great number of native horses fastened to the fence in front of the Council Chamber. Mr. Cooper, the returning officer, having explained the purpose for which the assemblage were collected,-^ — Manaena stood forward and said : — " I propose Karaitiana Takamoana as a member for the Assembly of the Government. Intoxicating liquors were introduced into this province when I was yet a child, but I have never once known him to be intoxicated. He has always adhered to the laws of the pakeha, even to the present time — a time when drunkenness has become prevalent amongst the inhabitants of Heretaunga (Ahuriri) — amongst its chiefs, its youth, and its women. But he has never committed himself. And again, Karaitiana has been a liberal guardian to the people, and men of low estate have been secured in the possession of their lands by bim." (This was said in allusion to the feud between the Ngatikahungunu chiefs and te Hapuku, who was driven off the Pakowhai plains in the year 1858.) Harawira te Tatere then stood forward, and, in seconding Karaitiana, he said : — " Karaitiana is the man. I support Karaitiana because he is an upholder of the pakeha laws and the Divine laws, and a friend to all men, whether pakeha or Maori." Tamati te Maruhaere, of Patangata, said: — "The man of whom I and all my people approve is Karaitiana. I approve of him because he is clear and able in his guidance and direction of the affairs of the people, whether relating to their tenure of lands, their weal or woe or any other matters." Hakaraia Pohawaiki also supported Karaitiana. After waiting some time, and no other person coming forward to propose a second candidate, the returning officer, taking out his watch, said that at the expiration of five minutes, if no other person were proposed, he would declare Karaitiana to be duly elected. The five minutes had barely expired when Karauria Pupu came forth from the throng and said : — •" Tareha is the man I propose — the man who has cherished the pakeha. He it was who sold Ahuriri to the pakeha, who has, in consequence, become a resident here. Therefore I say, let us have Tareha, the man who fostered and encouraged the pakeha. My reason for saying this is because I have heard that some have said Karaitiana is the liberal minded man. But it will be seen by this election who is to be the man. If it be Karaitiana — good ; if it be Tareha — good also." Te Hapuku, in seconding Tareha, said : — "Tareha is the man of whom I approve. I have said ere this that the member would be either Tareha or Karaitiana — if one did not succeed the other would. Now I say let Tareha be the man. In olden times with us, all men were chiefs, whether they were tall men or short men — it mattered not. Now, I repeat, let Tareha be the man. Hearken, ye pakehas ! let it be Tareha — Tareha I say ! I have done." No other candidates being brought forward, the returning officer called tor a show of hands, and the result was 33 for Karaitiana, and 34 for Tareha. A large number . of Karaitiana's men, it was said, were absent in the stores about the town. The re- :

turning officer then said if a poll were not demanded it would be his duty to declare Tareha duly elected. This not being done, Tareha was declared duly elected. Henere Tomoana then said : — " It is well. Let Tareha be the man. But I wish to say a word in answer to Karauria. 'It was not Tareha alone who sold land — it was all of the Heretaunga chiefs together. After the first sale of Ahuriri, then every man sold to the pakeha as he desired. Karauria is in error when he asserts that Tareha alone invited the pakeha to locate himself here — it was done by the whole body of the inhabitants of Heretaunga. We brought Karaitiana forward without much spirit in the matter ; we are working in the dark, as we do not know whether he would consent to act — he being absent at Rangitikei." Manaena then said : — "Let it be Tareha. We are acting in the dark for Karaitiana, as he is absent. He has said that he would not consent to be returned. But if he were here it is probable we should contest the election. However, as Tareha has been elected by a show of hands, let it remain so." The business here ended, and, after a loud cheer given with hearty good will, each man went his way.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18680418.2.9

Bibliographic details

Hawke's Bay Herald SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1868. ELECTION OF A NATIVE MEMBER., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 935, 18 April 1868

Word Count
1,131

Hawke's Bay Herald SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1868. ELECTION OF A NATIVE MEMBER. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 935, 18 April 1868

Working