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TRIP TO WAIROA.

LFBOM OUE SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.] The Cleopatra, paddle-steamer, announced to make a pleasure trip to Wairoa and back, left the Iron Pot on Monday last at 11 a.m., but, caught by the strong nor-wester blowing at the time, she grounded just outside the entrance. She had on board between 30 and 40 passengers, who, after looking forward to arriving at the Wairoa in the afternoon, found they* had no alternative but to wait the turn of the tide, and prepare themselves for the unpleasantness of anight voyage. A start was finally effected at 6 p.m. There was a steady breeze from N.N.W., but, by keeping well in with the land, there was no sea, and the voyage was a pleasant one. Passing in succession the settlements of Tongoio, Arapawanui, Mohaka, and Waihua, the steamer arrived ofF the mouth of the Wairoa river at |- past 11, where anchor was dropped for the night. As beds were out of the question — half a dozen persons filling the sofas — each passenger diligently sought out a soft plank on deck and used his best endeavours to obtain one or even a share of one of the few blankets which belonged to the ship. In this some were successful ; others were not ; but all had the shelter of the awning ; and the night, fortunately, was fine. The male passengers fared well enough, but for women and children the look-out was very 14 blue." At 4 a.m. Toha, the pilot, a fine looking and apparently highly intelligent fellow, came on board, and said that the tide would serve in an hour to enable us to get in. Accordingly steam was got up, and at 5 a.m. on Tuesday the steamer crossed the bar, there being at the time scarcely any break. She then entered the river — truly a noble stream — and steamed up to the township, making fast at £ past 5 to an apology for a wharf. Notwithstanding the early hour, a considerable number of persons had assembled on the bank to witness the steamer's arrival. The township of Clyde is built on the very fine river from which the name of the district is taken. It consisted originally of some 800 sections — a preposterous number for a small inland township, as the event has proved. Clyde, with its hundred or two inhabitants, occupies probably as much ground as Napier, and the time consumed in going from one house to another is a serious consideration. It cannot, for instance, be less than a mile from. Taylor's hotel to the residence of the Resident Magistrate, or to tH^H^fl room, all of which are within thjH|jHß^H the township. Among the^Hß^^^Bß noticed a school and teachejj^B^^HH showy court house, a lockjBBBSHHSS imposing- kOt^ls,.,. .^vera] jHHBB|^HH| stores (comprising those jBHS^BBfIB Mr. Finlayson, Mr. Prentic^^H^Hj^H mcc) and some tasteful P r^jjjffiHßßH Parallel with the main stree^H^BHHE —a wide and deep streamf^^BgH^B adapted for boating, bathing,VSH9H aquatic purposes ; its only foultV^Hflfl you cannot enter it or leave it &«aH|^^H owing to the sea which southerljlH^Bfl almost immediately raises on the b^^Hj^H In our list of buildings, we have n<VBHB tioned a church. We are sorry to sayw^H[ is nothing of the kind in Wairoa, at«H for the English settlers. Sunday after sSH day, the bell for public worship is heard the Maori pah on the other side of the rivefl but there is no such thing on the bank ofl cupied by the European- race. This is noir their fault, but one of the results of the unsettled state of things since the settlement had being, or at all events, since it began to expand. The want, however, is in a fair way of being supplied. Among the passengers by the Cleopatra was the earnestminded Bishop of Waiapu, who announced services (English and Maori) for to-morrow, and who lost no time in communicating with the residents upon the subject ofa stated ministry for the district. The Bi-jj shop is understood to have a suitable clergy.^ man in view, and to have received tronrthe population generally very great encouragement to proceed with his contemplated work. Another passenger by the Cleopatra was the Rev. Father Reignier, who has, we believe, regularly visited the Wairoa every three months — sometimes on foot, at others on horseback, and this, the first time, by the steamer — to attend to the spiritual interests of his flock. Having put up at Taylor's hotel — an exceedingly well conductficPestabJishment — we enjoyed a wash (many took a"swini in the river) and a'fiearty breakfast. Soon after, the shrill scream of the steam whistle gave intimation that the Cleopatra was about to start for the race course. Goin°on board — to do which it is necessary to descend a tolerably steep incline, the banks of the river being so high that, at low water, the masts of the steamer were little more than level with the top — we found a good many Wairoa settlers and their wives and children, in addition to most of the passengers from Napier — all bound for the scene of festivity, which is situated some four or five miles up the river. The trip was delightful — settlers' homesteads, on the one side, and native residences, on the other, appearing on the bank every few hundred yards. The latter include the house of Kopu, as well as other substantial weather board buildings. Having, by the process of scrambling up the steep bank, set foot on the " course," we found a goodly assemblage of people, the greater number of Avhom were natives. Two booths and a marquee decorated the ground ; and, as . is the case in regard to 'most small race meetings, the drinking appliances were perfect, while the general arrangements were very so-so. Far better, we think, had the Wairoa settlers got up a regatta on their fine river, in lieu of races ; but it must be admitted that the latter have wonderful attraction for maories and colonial youth generally. Soon after the passengers by water arrived on the ground, the usual preliminaries were gone through for the Hurdle Race ; 1 mile and a distance ; heats ; over 4 flights of hurdles, 3 feet, 6 inches. Prize, including stakes, £14 2s. The following were entered : — Harmer'sJack, (Gascoigne) 1 1 Power's Little William, (D.Munn) 2 2 Black ns. Fud, (Black) 3 3 The horses made a bad start, Little William declining to move from the starting post. Fud took the lead, closely followed by Jack, and both took their jumps, remarkably well. Fud, however, led all the way round and came in an easy winner, but, in consequence of liis rider dismounting before coming to the weighing stand, the last place was assigned to him. Little

William got away from the starting post after great persuasion, but too late to give him any chance for the heat. There being, however, no distance in this race, he was all right for the second heat. For the second heat, the three horses got away well together and took their jumps in first rate style— -Fud leading as before, the other two well in the rear, laboring heavily but refusing nothing.' At the last hurdle, Fud unfortunately struck the rail and rolled over— treading, it is supposed, on his rider's face, who lay insensible for some time, and whose nose proved. to be broken, and face much lacerated. Little William and Jack took the hurdle at the same moment, but the former also touched and fell, rolling over his rider, who, however, to the astonishment of all bystanders, got up again without scratch or bruise. Jack cleared his hurdle and of course won in a canter. The second event of the meeting was the Scurry Stakes. Prize £17 ; one mile and a distance ,• heats ; catch weights. Heslop's Zoo, (Carroll) 1 t Preece's Jerry, (Downs) 4 2 Power's Spider, (Greathead) 5 3 Heta's Hikaputa, (Paora) 0 0 Kerei'a Witimoa, (Kuru) 0 0 McNamee'sColleenßawD,(Boyd)... 0 0 —About this race there is nothing further to be said than that it was simply a gift to " Zoe." She was no doubt by far the fastest horse, and, to make things more easy, she carried the lightest weight. The next was the race of the meeting — the Wairoa Stakes ; 2 miles ; one event. The money for this event amounted to £21 10a. Five horses came to the scratch, viz :— - PowdrelPs Black Boy (owner) 1 Morris's Heather Jock (Carroll) ... 2 Hapimana's Rangatira (Paora) ... dis. Paora 's Rererangi dis. Witty's Darkey (Hague) dis, — This again was evidently a present. to Black Boy (a Bishop), who had it all bis own way. His rider was simply playing with the darky jocks, letting them come near him only to laugh at them. Rangatira and Rererangi, too, were crack horses ■ at last meeting. The last event of the day was the Forced Handicap ; one mile and distance, one event. Public money £17. Out of five entrances, only four came to the scratch, viz. : — Heslop's Zoe, Bst 71b (Carroll) 1 PowdrelPs Black Boy, list (owner)... 2 Preece's -Terry, 7st (Downs) ... ... 3 Black's Fud, 7st 101 b (Preece) 4 - Harmer's Jack, Bst dr. HRHHMHteuning on this occasion was a HHH^^H^B^Hkiinitiated. Indeed this HHHj^H^e best race of the day HHH^^Hj^^HH^Ked say another lOlbs. too much for them, Hj^^^^HH^^e her go faster |H^^H^^H|^^^H|^^^BHH^Jiave to go. BHHB^H^^BHH^B^^H|^^too dayBHHHBH^^HH^H in as ie hHI^9HIRIRI^9iBrIBI^bI termed^^HHHBHHH^^^BHHH ting tb( «HH9B^^U^^B^BSS traction3HHHH^^^ljHHoH|HH -further ]B^HKhHHBH[H^H^H^B present ifl|B^9fiflfiHl^^Hß^^^^H tion, ow JBbbHB9HBI^^^^IBBI!J^B howeverjP^flß^H^^Bß^^^^SßßHH dent, beiH^BflHH^^BH^^^^B^H|^Bu seen from publie^Jbig^H^H^^B^H^^l^HßHjH the u g u i^HßHß^99fl^^EHßjjß^H the thermometeralHß|^^^H^HH^HH shade, venture u P°rrVßßß^9^B^^^^B Better luck, perhaps, Next (Thursday) mornu^S^Bj^BHß 10, the little steamer took her depaffll^FP for Napier ; but some doubt was felt as to whether she would get out of the river, as a souther had been blowing since 4 a. m. The bar, we must confess, with a succession of high rollers right across, did not look inviting. However the little boat went through them well, and would have escaped scatheless but for touching ground, which was the signal for a sea to break on board. No damage, however, was done ; and, by 11 a.m., she was well clear of the bar. There being a head sea outside, and the vessel's bottom being foul, she made at first but slow progress, and did not enter the Iron Pot till 6 p.m.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18680118.2.9

Bibliographic details

Hawkes Bay Herald, Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 910, 18 January 1868

Word Count
1,710

TRIP TO WAIROA. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 910, 18 January 1868

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