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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

Tho Editor does not hold himßelf re^o t H*f6lMi«fj:r?t opinions' expressed by ■corteWpaßnfy,;£p_.iy y *w^

Sib,— The writer of the letter who signs himself "One. who wishes to see iair ..;•- play," was, I. imagine, so thoroughly, prostrated by the magnitude of his undertaking as to fee totally incapable of completing the' sentence. Judging from the tenor of his letter, He evidently intended , to sign himself thus, " One who wishes to ; , see fair play for'the Waipukurau clan." ■ Such an effusion of wishy-washy twaddle could only emanate from a person of low vulgarity and little mind. It appears; - throughout to have been -jerked together - inadvertently, by one suffering, from. ». v fresh attack of rheumatics, or just . re- j | covering from the irritable effects of- a . mustard poultice, „ T J. ',-?; I, on behalf of the occupiers of the i._, rabbit huts, woukl> remind your correspondent that most of them are the " bona fide" property* of the occupants. They do not have to doff their manorial caps, except when they deem it a; matter of courtesy. - . When the rabbits grow big enough they intend inviting over our worthy traducer for a day's sport, as they believe j him to be one of the crack shots, judging .= from the number of marks scored at rifle practice. - In conclusion, I Would recommend him, |: when he again appears in print, to be a little more prudent sin his similes ; or rather ,bestow his raref capabilities upon, his profession, and confine nimself within the limits of liis own sphere-rthat may probably be cleaning pots and drawing. .'. beer. Truly a nice advocate for the~ commercial prosperity of a place.—l am, &c.,'. ' Young v Levebet. | Waipawa, October 17. - Sib,— Referring to your issue of 15th j instant, I find two letters relating, to the telegraph station being at Waipawa, instead of at Waipukurau— the first signed by " One who wishes to see fair play/ the latter by Mr. F. H. Drower.: Both parties seem desperately injured, and from their tone'would try to convince thepubi . lie that Waipukurau was, the pole' and only place for the telegraph station ; in fact, that the amount of business; the •-' aristocracy, and the people in it, made it of more importance than our worthy township of Waipawa ; and that -there is no . • ? place (unless Waipukurau) fit for a station between there and Napier. Surely . these people, must be mad to suppose such a thing. ' • ' ' '''„.■ y ';&'■' '''■- " One who wishes to see fair play :, has the audacity to refer to the houses '.at. '; Waipawa as rabbit-huts and sentry-boxes, , ; Perhaps, if every man had his : rights, he < might not be worth even that himself,' and, ;' many more of his neighbours. As to tfee; . : class of people he alludes to, that j will /vi hardly require the use of the telegraph/at ji c -. Waipawk,. allow us to be the best judges?}. yu, at any ratei we won't allow, the Waipu-.- ; knrauites to govern us, or to do as;they, .... like with us, as they i too -well know. „ • Again, the same writer alludes- to certain ,»•:;. members; merchants in Napier, -who also : .. > supported, the station at Waipawa,-rin.. - consequence' of which they threaten, to „ open up a trade with Wellington, via Po- ; rangahau, . and get their supplies from . thence, instead of Napier, inferring a sort ...,; of independence whiclrthe Napier mej>., ,; chants will laugh at ; for, gentle reader, , as those same merchants know, most of . A ; the goods, as well as liquors,, of -these _ tfto would-be 1 independent settlers, })-. are im;- 6 - : . : ported from England; therefore, ;their ;; , trade with the Napier merchants-is harm* r , . less. Moreover/they are under the thumb > of one lord, and whatever that lord says is ./ law, and they have to succumb to him, no; matter what the result. So- where is- , their independence ? ; ••/;-.•_ .: I have no doubt they are an : unexcep r tionable lot, in their own estimation, but not in ours ; arid I think it would do them ,■ more credit if they studied* their own place, without interfering with -Waipawa. Our members undoubtedly know their work, without being catechised by them, which every sane person will admit by*their decision in this instance.- Instead of running down their member all through the piece (who, I -dare say, would feel flnore honored without Waipukura- -«*J its clique of unsatisfied and igr- -a and stituents), I would suggest -^rant conalludes to mile-stones yp : --» as * e .«?^ " something must b- >a nd that not go on in tb- -* done, for ■ things;canof those vp 1 -f wa J -*J* ¥.get-a few the ne p1 -suable commodities tied round ,j ~i£S of himself and his colleagues,, .a cast themselves into the sea, thereby ridding the place of a dissatisfied clique, and obliging the public at large. — I am, <&c, - Telegbaph. Waipawa, Oct. 17, 1867, Sib, — In your journal of the 15th inst., a case is stated under the title, " Waipu- " kurau v. Waipawa," Its ramifications are numerous and comprehensive, including a statement of alleged facts, with illustrations ; evidence to be taken for granted ; interrogatories which are overwhelming ; and closing with a summing-up, combining the awful and the pathetic. As I perused it, I comically felt convinced that at the foot of the letter I should find an editorial note, " extracted from the ' Napier Punch,' " but when I reached • the peroration, concluding with " One who wishes to see Fair Play," I "mentally exclaimed — Really ! ' Now, Sir, before I left England, I fre-" quently received your journal from friends in this colony ; and as its contents had a share in inducing me to emigrate . to New Zealand, and your paper ,was circulated by me in various ways, I- believe the letter of '* One who &&.," may' have an injurious tendency on the minds of your readers in the British Isles. You ' know there are seasons of solitude, when every scrap of "paper is read with avidity, and if this identical letter should, find its way into the hands of an intending emigrant, what would the effect of learning, from such a reliable , source, that the abodes of men in one of the largest town- > ships in jthis province aro " rabbit-huts (hutches?) and sentry-boxes," not even allowing of a recumbent position P Certainly every sensible man would decide to stay at home, were it not, that he knows what a sentry-box is, while " One who &c," evidently does not. I am neither a householder nor a property owner in Waipawa or Waipukurau,. but as I happened to be in the neighborhood when your journal reached me, I made enquiry, and found thiit Waipawa » contains about 30 houses, (sentry-boxes ?)v each containing, on an average, five in- . mates. 'There is a pretty church, .with a steeple and a bell; a spacious schoolhouse, with a steeple, but no bell ; three, hotels; and — last, but not least I—a1 — a Go-' vernment Court-house. (This information is for your English readers.) - But I must be brief. According to ■. " One who &c," if Waipukurau does not obtain: the Telegraph Station in preference s to Wai* pawa, the remit will be as MowS—tlie .. greatest" shake" oh record, viz\ ";--; The gallant Major who represents that locality in the Provincial Council will be ~ a'British soldier without v i pluck." r ■ J \ The Waipukurauians will fight for - themselyesTr-volunteers ■■'.' en:masse.'' s i ,' The merchants of 'Napier wUI :recewj-^

no fiiture orders from the "neglected people." (^ an^* *k e , Barracks be readily converted into a workhouse P) 'They (the Waipukurauians) will act like comnipn-sense people, and buy their . "goods at the cheapest market (Wellington.) Why did they not think of that before P i They will unite, and keep their money in their own place. (Capital ; the general complaint is that all the money is going out of the colony.) ' The Banks will fail, and have to be wound up. (Great are the banking resources of Waipukurau, and " One who &c.,-" is its profit (prophet.) "One who. &c. concludes, "Something must be done, for things cannot go on in, this way,"— -so I have been and gone and done' it. Why does he kick (back* I believe is the colonial term) by writing a letter which savours more of <* x horse play" than '• fair play-P" ' I would have appended my name to _ fhis missal, but my statements are self evident, and require no authentication ; and as " Truth lies at the bottom of" a WV' 1 sign myself - . ■■•■-.•- ' Let Well Alone. . Cosmos, October 16. , •Buck.— Should not this word be spelt Buck : as it is clearly a contraction of the name of some political agitator who flourished in the barbarous period of New Zealand's history, and who was probably endowed with an unbridled tongue ?-*-L. W.A # Sir,— Will you allow me, through the medium of your valuable journal, to ask my felloV settlers at the Meanee whether there cannot be a cricket club formed, among us. Ebiowing, as I do, several food players are now resident among us,, call upon those gentlemen to commence a club before the summer is over, so that we may convince the community that we v are not behind in sporting matters, however much the toll-gate question goes on. I am sorry to find that the town club, in consequence of their, late defeat, have acted in accordance with a certain saying, viz., " Groand play with the boys." However, if the members of the town club will keep; up their pecker for a few weeks, I thinkVtVe- Heatiee boys will be open to play tnem, at least I trust so. Hoping -this feeble hinttfiH cause our cricketing,. friends at the Meanee to' come to the, front, I am, &c, . ' 4 Cricket. Siß,~ln your issue "of ISiesday, October 15th, I was surprised to see a letter from Mr. Drower relative to the petition to the Colonial Secretary in favour of the electric telegraph station to be at Waipawain preference to Waipukurau. I can sympathise with /the feelings of Mr. D. in the prospect of losing the telegraph station at - Waipukurau, but lam surprised that he • should " attempt Jto persuade ; the public that he <is actutvted by disinterested motives'in the matter. He urges as a reason "why it should be at Waipukurau, the uncertsmifj? of -th\6 mails between Waipawa: and that place: Poes Mr. Drower expect f that our postmaster will forward '. the mails 5 by the. wires to Waipukurau P Mr.' DJ should bear in mind that there is a down < "as well as , an up' mail. I have ! made enquiry relative to the detention of. the 'mail.- I find that during the late heavy floods the mall was detained about the Kgaruroro on two or three occasions, but not between Waipawa and Waipukura'u." •'■■•■. ; . In. reference to the extent of country to be benefited south of Waipukurau, no • one knows better than Mr. T>. thatthere are but seven or eight stations that can be benefited by its being at Waipukurau, - and: one of them belongs to Mr. Ormond, who voted for Waipawa ; the , whole of the plains and the township of Hampden being, nearej and more easy of access in a flood from Waipawa than Waipukurau. In reference to the conduct of . members, I am only surprised that there was a dis-,, sen'ting vote on the occasion. lam convincfed that the only principle that actuated Mr: -D. was purely personal interest. — lam,i<fec, -' • . . ■ ; . ' Waipawa. P.S.-^— Eelative to the letter signed "One who wishes to see fair play," I " must say it is as crooked as the writer.

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Bibliographic details

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 886, 22 October 1867

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1,902

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 12, Issue 886, 22 October 1867

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