Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

WAIPUKURAU.

f'JBOM A COBRESPONDENT.]

ONthe evening of Wednesday last, the 14th inst., the new building lately erected at Waipukurau, to se&fe both as a schoolroom and a church, Was formally opened by a tea-party given by a few ladies of the locality. The room is a very handsome one, and reflects great credit on the architect, Mr. Winlove. It-was very tastefully decorated under the superintendence of a young lady lately arrived in the colony, and presented a very gay appearance. It was expected that Mr. Henry Eussell or Mr. Gollan would ha«e taken, the t chair, but, in their absence, it was occupied by Mr. Harding, another of the trustees, who conducted the meeting with great judgment and tact, and gave much satisfaction.

The Chaibman, in his opening remarks, referred to the great change that had taken place in the locality since his arrival, and congratulated the meeting that, on this occasion at least, they would not have to appeal to the pockets of their audience, as their house was free of debt. He paid a high compliment to Mr. Eussell, saying that but for that gentleman's energy and Eerseverance they would not likely have ad for some time such a beautiful build-

ing. The Chaieman then called upon the Eev. A. Shepherd, pastor " loci, ' to address the meeting. Mr. Shepherd touched upon the great fallacy of those who come to the colonies expecting to get wealth and position without the adequate toil and trouble necessary for success, and spoke upon other subjects.

The Eev. J. M'Michael, of Meanee Presbyterian Church, was then called upon to address the meeting. He took as the •foundation of his address Sir William Hamilton's motto, that " On earth there is nothing great but man ; in man there is nothing great but mind." From this he urged upon parents, sabbath school teachers, and minister, to use their new erection for the purpose of implanting this noble principle in the minds of the rising generation. He showed that, as man was an immortal being, to him religious knowledge was of the utmost importance, and until you filled his mind with that, you could neither make him good nor contented nor happy. He concluded to the following effect : — " Creation in all its majesty and glory, in all its peerless splendour and matchless magnificence, can only in silent eloquence speak forth its Creator's praise. Fields and forests, hills and mountains, smiling valleys and sunny seas — in one word, universal nature, from the deep bass of ocean to the merry •ringing carol of the lark, form one grand choir, crying, " Great and marvellous are thy works Lord God Almighty. But man — glorious, immortal, man — can, rise through nature in all her gorgeous grandeur, in all her surpassing loveliness, up to nature's God, ana can think about and admire and worship ahd adore the infinitely great and glorious Creator. .He can do more — he can claim paternity with God ; he oan say "My Father made them all." He can do more — he can look up to Christ, his elder brother — the GodMan, the Mediator — seated on His emerald throne ; and through Him he can claim a throne, a crown, a kingdom. Though chained to earth, he can soar to glory, and join in Heaven's grand universal chorus, "To Him that loved us and washed us from our sins in His own blood, to Him be glory and dominion for ever and ever."

Major Lambebt next addressed the young people present,and urged them to use the room, more especially erected for their benefit, for their mental and moral improvement. A few of the working men then addressed the meeting.

During the evening the meeting was greatly enlivened by the singing and playing of the Miss Hardings and Miss Herbert. The rain during the afternoon came down in torrents ; yet, notwithstanding the inclemenoy of the nighty the meeting was a great success, about eighty persons in all having been present. At an early hour the meeting separated, all greatly pleased with this, their first social gathering.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/HBH18670820.2.8

Bibliographic details

WAIPUKURAU., Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 11, Issue 868, 20 August 1867

Word Count
674

WAIPUKURAU. Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 11, Issue 868, 20 August 1867

Working