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(fkoh otjb. own coebesponbeht.) London, May 26, 1864. The world is going round pretty much as usual, so far as this country is concerned, although both on the Continent and in America important events are occurring or are imminent. Perhaps most interesting of all at the present moment are the meetings of " THE CONFEBENCE. An armistice of a month has been agreed upon, but. the. Austrian, and .Prussian troops (notably the latter) hav9 scarcely kept to the terms of

agreement. Their treatment of the inhabitants of Jutland has throughout been most abominable. No one at present even pretends to guess what the ultimate result will be, but Denmark is sure to be robbed in some way. AMERICA. The great campaign of the year across the Atlantic is probably ended by this time. A ■WEEK OP BATTIBS. By the last mail we learn that the two armies have had repeated and bloody engagements, the Federals having lost about 40,000 men. General Grant made the attacks. He has never succeeded in driving General Lee from the field, but the latter has several times withdrawn during the night and taken up a fresh position. Of course every mile towards Kichmond places the Confederates nearer to, and the Federals farther from, their base of supplies. Elsewhere, the Confederates have been having the best of it. THE STEAM BAMS. The papers, to-day, state that our Government has purchased the steam rams built by the Messrs. Laird, and about which there has been so much to do, at a cost of rather less than a quarter of a million. SUPPOSED PIRATES. An interesting trial has just been concluded. Some men who had taken part in capturing a Federal vessel, the Geritty, on which they had embarked as passengers, were taken into custody, in order to be handed over to the Federal Government. They have now heen released on the ground that, if any offence was committed, it was piracy de jure gentium, and therefore the trial could take place in this country, and in consequence the clauses of the extradition treaty would not apply. GENERAL GARIBALDI. The Italian is safely home again, looking after his flocks and his crops in the rocky island of Caprera. There is still a good deal of talk and a little ill-feeling (not against him) about his departure ; and the working men especially are greatly dissatisfied. There is no doubt that he went under an entirely mistaken impression. ITALY. He will be ready at a moment's notice to lead or join an army in a march against the Quadrilateral or towards Eome. The poor old Pope is still alive, though suffering ; but his death will probably bring matters to a crisis. FRANCE Is peace, so at least official speakers say. Her warlike mission is over, and she is going to be quiet. She is very quiet at present, but the '•ideas" of Emperors are impulsive, and nobody knows when a new one may turn up and 100,000 men be employed to realize it. If Napoleon 111. were to take the Khenish provinces, few people in this country (except perhaps the Queen) would now greatly regret it. NAVAL ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN THE AUBTRIANS AND DANES. Whilst the House of Commons was sitting, on Monday evening, May 9, a telegram was received, amidst vociferous cheers from all sides, that the plucky Danes had given the Austrians a beating at sea. The best account that has appeared is from the pen of the special correspondent of the Tivies, which I enclose. [This account will be found elsewhere.] THE POLISH INSURRECTION Is still dragging along — the poor unfortunate creatures being most cruelly treated by the Russians, who shew no mercy. The Pope has issued a manifesto on their behalf, which cannot but have done good in Catholic countries. No being with a spark of humanity left in him could but blush at the enormities of the Muscovite. LOED PALMEESTON. The premier has had another and a very serious attack of gout. He was away from the House for some days, and although he re-appeared there last Friday amidst the most vociferous cheering of the House, such repeated attacks must have a decided effect upon him. Still he is very tough. MR. GLADSTONE AND REFORM. In a debate introduced by Mr. Baines, M.P. for Leeds, for reducing the Borough Franchise, Mr. Gladstone astonished both friends and foes. He advocated the measure in the most uncompromising way, and used expressions whicli almost pointed to universal suffrage. He is now hailed by the advanced Liberal party as their future leader. The Tories chuckle (somewhat foolishly) over what they imagine to be a blunder, and the Whiga hardly know what to make of it, THE QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY. This moveable feast was celebrated on Tuesday. It was a general holiday, and the House of Commons had two days' adjourning, also over the Derby Day, till to-day. There were the usual playing of bands, giving of official dinners, firing of guns, and waving of flags, but nothing particular. THE QUEEN IN SCOTLAND. Her Majesty has gone to Balmoral with some of her children for a few weeks, and will there receive her son and daughter-in-law, and Prince Louis of Hesse and his wife. THE PRINCE OF WALES Has, in behalf of our good little Queen, been holding levees and drawing-rooms, assisted by the Priucees Alexandra ; and on the 18th of this month .he presided at his first public dinner— rthat/ of the " Literary Fund." The occasion was rather a trying one no doubt, surrounded as the young Prince was by the elite of the educated world: nevertheless, his speeches were very graceful, and reflected much credit on his good sense and good feeling. THE ROYAL ACADEMY, This year, has opened with an excellent display of pictures, and the general impression is that the present is more than an average Exhibition. The only regret is that the portraits, full size and medium, of ladies and gentlemen, were not placed nearer the ceilings, and the landscapes and historical paintings brought nearer the line. THE COLONIAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY Have held their meetings, and the report of

their proceedings seemed in every way satisfactory. THE DERBY. Yesterday's was perhaps the most exciting Derby Bince the institution of the race. The prophets were all wild. There were so many good horses, that they trembled as they made a choice. In one sporting paper there were ■ seven versified prophesies, the last of which happened to be right. It is asserted that there never were so many people on Epsom Downs before, and certainly the crowd was immense. Although a large majority went by train, it seemed as though the cavalcade returning by road was interminable. The donkey of the costermonger jostled the guardsman's four-in-hand, and every vehicle within 3 miles of London, must have been out. Not a few broke down and will never come back. It was a capital race, a much larger number than usual being near at the finish. The winner was Blair Athol, who defeated the favorite, General Peel, by about two lengths. The Prince of Wales was down with the Duke of Cambridge, and of course his presence added a good deal of eclat to the meeting. As usual, Epsom was the scene of the annual London carnival, and the mind shrinks from the attempt to imagine the number of hampers that were emptied or the number of bottles (empty) that must now decorate the course. CRICKET. Sporting suggests cricket, the season of which has just begun, and begun very well too. In spite of the absence of " the twelve," we can still get up two good elevens, and even find a team which will stand a very good chance against the Australians, if a match can be made. The game was never in such favour in this country, and it is quite pleasant to find that our Antipodean brothers and cousins keep up their interest in the old English game. Perhaps when Macaulay's New Zealander does come over, he will bring an eleven to beat any tvveuty-two of this degenerate land. THE SHAKESPEARE TERCENTARY Has been more or less a success. There is to be a large school instituted in connection with the Dramatic College ; Mr. Webster is the ruling spirit. There is no doubt the " London Committee " would have fared better, had their body been smaller, and thus have enabled them to have carried out a good scheme of commemoration. Nothing so excellent for work as a committee of one, and the Eight Rev. W. Spurgeon once said that if the building of the Ark had been handed over to a Committee, not a soul would have been saved, for the Deluge would have done its work while the committee were talking. THEATRES, MUSIC, ETC. The Theatres are in full swing — both Opera houses rivalling each other in the splendour of scenery and the abilities of the various artistes engaged. " Faust " has been again put on both stages, and is as great a favorite as ever. Miss Bateman still rules supreme at the Adelphi, causing even the hard-hearted Punch to cry over her touching representation of " Leah." The last new thing is a grand revival of " Hamlet " by Mr. Fechter. This play has never been put upon the stage in such a complete and classical manner, nor has the magnificence of the dresses or scenery been surpassed. Miss Kate Terry plays the part of " Ophelia," and has added to her already justly deserved fame by her clever acting in this difficult role. Mr. Tom Taylor has been at no end of pains to revive an old sort of play called a Morality, and has brought one out at the Olympic called " Sense and Sensation," but it has not been received with favor. Indeed it would be a marvel if any play of " Sense " was successful, the almighty cry being for "Sensation." The morning, afternoon and evening concerts prevalent about this time of year are more numerous than ever — St. James' Hall, Hanover Square Rooms, Exeter Hall and other places being never free from the incessant noise of many-voiced and many-stringed instruments. GAMBLING IN THE WAR OFFICE. Quite a sensation has been caused among Government officials by a severe example made by Lord De Grey and Ripon (the Minister for War) of three or four principal ringleaders in a rather extensive gambling game — " chicken hazard " — which had been carried on for some time past. Of course the public are laughing at the foolish talk they hear of the over-work of these officials, and quietly repeat the saying of Punch, about Government clerks being like the fountain in Trafalgar Square — " playing " from ten to four. Earl De Grey deserves the thanks of the public for the impartiality displayed, for the two head men dismissed bad worked their way into very influential positions. The minor delinquents were severely reprimanded. DR. HAROLD BROWNE, The brother of your late governor, has been ap-? pointed to the Bishopric of Ely, vacant by the decease of Dr. Turton. The new Bishop is a man of great attainments, and was for many years one of the Professors at Cambridge. Your readers will remember he has taken up the cudgels here on behalf of his brother and New Zealand affairs. NEW ZEALAND BANKING CORPORATION. The first ordinary meeting of the proprietors was held on the 4th May, Mr. H. A. Hankey presiding. The accounts show a profit of £1,729 11s 3d, as the result of nine months' operations. A dividend at the rate of ten percent, per annum was declared. It was announced by the Chairman that the company had been appointed the agents in New Zealand to the Agra and United Service Bank. THE WAR IN NEW ZEALAND. The Neiv Zealand Examiner published a full report of the debate in the House of Commons, and you will observe that all the pros and cons of the press are given. The prosperous carrying out of the War in New Zealand has caused great satisfaction here, and the determined zeal of both.soldiers and colonists is much admired. There is a certain class, the members of which cry out loudly about "confiscation," and the " protection of aborigines;" but while there is a universal wish that full justice should be done to the Maoris, the general judgment is that the question at issue should be so settled as to cause a long and lasting peace. That is the opinion of those who are not less philan-

thropic than the philanthropists, but who look at the facts from a different point of view.

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Bibliographic details

Hawkes Bay Herald, Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 7, Issue 517, 6 August 1864

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2,099

Hawkes Bay Herald Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 7, Issue 517, 6 August 1864

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