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THURSDAY. DECEMBER 11. 19.19. LABOUR AND ITS CRITICS.

THE methods of the opponents of Labour, in the present election, campaign an- everywhere characterised by a lack j of real political principles, and by an j attempt to make the most puerile tac- j tics, do duty;- in place, of a policy. In,, Australia, the issue of the elections is.

the real question of the hour—that of profiteering — but in this country the manifold organs of propaganda controlled by the implacable enemies of Labour and the working classes are united in a campaign of vilification' and misrepresentation. The basest tricks are resorted to in order to kjgep the people from coming into thei^ own. The cry of "Bolshevism" isi raised as a drumfire of vituperation or a miasma of poison gas everywhere. But. after all". Labour is only the better off that its enemies are induced to such a pnss. Had they a policy programme that seriously faced the crying needs of the day, then Labour's assurance of success would perhaps be less than H is, but as things are the ball is at last at the feet of the working class Jn. New Zealand. The other parties focus all their guns upon "Labour merely to destroy, while Lalxmr directs its energy to construct. It is necessary., however to point out at times the deceits of the other side. They care more for what is sent out of the country than for what is in it. They ignore the man with small means who wants land; they allow profiteering to go on; they tinker with the housing, food-raising, taxation, customs! and industrial problems : they prefer militarism to social reform : a nd they like strife better than peace. Counting heads is also a favourite resort with them, and thoir only interest in the individual seems to "be to see the wav he is going to vote. At Westnort there has been a regrettable incident at a school, where a Jjallot of senior pupils in regard to political candidates ha s been taken. This is merely veiled canvassing, and deserves to be denounced as an attempt -to violate the secrecy of .the ballot. That the vote taken did not tell favourably for the opponents of Labour is poetical retribution; perhaps, but that does not palliate the gravity of the complaint. When, in addition, a Westport paper refers to Mr Holland's remarkably successful Cobden meeting as an occasion on which he was "clean Bowled," it is time to protest against such misrepresentation. This sort of thing goes beyond mere abuse; it is »n injustice not to one but to many, Other papers break out into hysterics about "Bolshevism." but these are 'so palpably evidences of political bankruptcy that they harm nobody. Then there is the paper that cites a despicable incident like that at Murchison as an evidence of real loyalty, when anybody but aji im becile would regard' it as merely "bases political trickery. Labour has not sought to make political capital out of the Ashburton exposure of its enemies, and its example i§ one that will appeal to all fair-minded people," Labour has more at stake in the elections than the other parties, and hence it cannot afford to allow itself to be s,ide tracked by the wiles of opponents. It depends upon the intelligence of the people to recognise the real facts of ' the situation and will not do so in vain.

Master Kenneth Griffon of the Marist Brothers School is this year's winner of the Bevilacqua Medal in the Sixth proficiency examination. An interesting advt. on page four of this issue we draw our readers' attention to. If Prohibition is carried this advertisement shows how enormously the cost of living would be increased. A meeting of members and intending members of the Greyniouth Swimming Club will be held at the office of Fogart* and Co. Mackay Street, this evening at 8 o'clock. \ Land values continue to rise *in Sdtth Taranaki. The latest sale reported is that of a farm of just- over GO acres on the western border of the borough of Hawora, which has been sold at the record price of £2000 per acre. A social and dance'will be held in the Te Kinga Hall on Saturday the 13th inst.. proceeds of which will be applied towards defraying election expenses of Labour's selected candidate for Westland" (Mr J. O'Brien). Excellent music will be provided, and a splendid night's enjoyment is assured those attending. ' ■«! Mis* Elsie Salmon. oT S-ccfton, avlio for several years past has suffered with a form of paralysis' died on Tuesday afternoon. The young lady Avas only 24 years of age and well known. Her decline into bad health a few years ago removed an active and' promising figure from i>* town. Her friends have the sympathy of tlr whole district. . ••-.. Mr J. I Barrow begs to notify the general public that he has purchased the coal business recently carried on by Mr D. Shannahan, and will in future carrT on the business of coal merchant.- Orders may be left at the offiqe, Herbert Street. "or by ringing Barrow and Sons, 'phones 201, 198, and 85. Cobden orders may be left with Mrs Abbie. . „ .

Before concluding the business at the Repatriation Committee meeting last evening the Chairman referred to the fact that it would be the last meeting which Mr Morgan would attend as he had been transferred to another district The Chairman, in expressing the regret- of the members in losing such a valuable Committee-man, trusted that Mr Morgan would continue to rise in the Government service, aud wished Mr and Mrs Morgan and family a happy and prosperous future in their new domice. Mr Morgan suitably acknowledged the compliment. Saturday will see the political destiny of Australia decided for another I"cVni. The House or Representatives j in the last Federal Parliament contain- ! od 52 supporters of the Coalition as against 23 members of the Labour Opposition. It. is necessary, therefore, for Labour to hold aTI its present, seats and fo win 15 others in order to sccuro a majority of one in tne ;J3ouse. In the last Parliament the farmers' representatives supported the Coalition, us also did- the renegades from the Labour Party. • It will be, interesting to sec what their fate will be on Saturday. New Zealand will get ii lead from Australia.

The cable services, owing- to European main line interruptions ate conF'\sted with traffic, and Asiatic, and African work being- therefore diverted to the lines to Australasia. The Eastrn Extension Cable Coy is at present unable to accept, any traffir from New Zealand for the United Kingdom The Pacific Cable Board notify no delay on fully paid traffic from New Zea^ 'land to United Kingdom. deferred traffic is showing dclwy, and a block is accumulating. Inward fully paid traffic is showing two days delay. Deferred inward traffic will "probably show from six to seven days delay.

Nash's Laundry are advertising for a girl.

Anderson and Son advertise that they want to rent loose hoxes for the coming season.

Gas consumers are notified that no discount will be allowed on accounts left unpaid after 4 p.m. to-day.

Tlie New Zealand Railway Department are advertising in this issue. announcements regarding Christmas and New Year holidays.

An advertiser in another colnmn, wants to contract for purchase/ of output of sawmill. Write to "C.H." care "Argus" Office.

A fine of £75 was imposed on a Christchurch niTlk vendor, for selling milk not up to the standard. This was his third conviction.

In this issue Mr- L. V. Shepherd, gives notice that he has applied to the Grey County Council for permission to erect a swing «ate across Manuka track at Rullierglen.

Before the war it was computed that there were 10,000,000 agricultural workers in Germany, 9,0007000 in France, and 1,500,000 in Great Britain.

Attention is drawn to the advertisement in another column, of Mt" J ■ Dumble Hair Specialist, who ha,s now .removed to more suitable premises in Upper Mnwliera Quay, next door to Milner (jeweller). Ladies hairdressing, shampooing sinking and massaging aspecialty.

Nearly 000 motor cars were drawn up in the accommodation paddock at t"ie Stratford Show on People's Day. Fords with a total of 154, predominated, closely run by 4 the Dodge, with 148.

After his meeting to-morrow night at Kokatahi, Mr P. C. Webb will join Mr James O'Brien (^aoour's candidate for Westland), o n tnc occasion of the latter 's visit to Ross, where Mr Webb will speak along with the candidate. They both speak at Ruatapu and Otira on the following day.

At the recent election for the Swedish Parliament the Conservatives lost their former majority in the first Cham ber, aud to-day they have 39 seats, while formerly they had 86 out of a total number of 150 scats. The Socialists, who formerly had 19 scats, now have 48, the Liberals have .41 seats, a loss of two scats; the Independent Socialists have increased their number of seats from two to four.

JJ'algety and Coy are. in receipt of a cable from their London house, stating that the attendance of buyers at tho wool sale on the Ist inst was largo and competition animated, with an average selection. Merions generally were from par to 50/o higher. Fine medium eross-breds were un changed./ All cross-breds are very firm and prices unchanged except for coarse, dingy, and cottccl cross-breds, which were 50/o lower than last sale 's closing rates.

A singular death is reported from Opotiki near Eotorua. A , man named Johnston died in the. Opotilci Hospital from lockjaw caused in the first place by a slight flick on th-> c:ir by the leash of a stock whip, wlroh he was using a fortnight ago. Johnston had tied the string from an artificial manure sack o n to the whin for a temporary leash.

The Anti-Profiteering League, an organisation which has declared war on tho three P's — Profiteers.. Parasites, and Poverty, — recently carried the following motion at a public meeting in Sydney:— -"That, in view of the failure of the Government to prevent profiteering, and the rise of the cost of commodities, we arc of the opinion that the time has arrived when . the i trades union movement sliould take I steps to prevent, the export of certain ■ necessary commodities until such time as these goodsi are made available to tho public at reasonable prices. And, further, we pledge ourselves to support tho movement with the above object in vinew." Tho Avatersidcrs have promised to givo the proposal full consideration.

In their reports dated September 15, Messrs Mailler and Qucrcau, New York stated in regard to snipping matters that there is very little now in the situation. Freight is offering very slowljr, so that steamers arc delayed on the berth for longer periods than usual owing, to the impossibility of getting sufficient cargo to fill. This has resulted in fewer steamers being chartered or laid on the berth for the Australian trade, and the desptitches arc at longer periods. Freight rates continue very firm, and as the cost of operating steamships appears to bo increasing should any change occur in rates it would probably mean advances.

The new railway regulations provide that single tickets for distances over 20 miles are made available for four days including date of issue, and return tickets for distances over ten miles are made available for return for one month including date of <ssue. The currency of all tickets is to terminate at midnight. Holiday excursion tickets are to be issued r-^aing from (j/- first and 4/- second for journeys of 20 to 26 miles to £5 10/3 for first and £3 13/(> for second for a 500 mile journey. Special excursion rates are provided for parties. Trains may be run by special request upon payment of a deposit (as a guarantee, returnable if the takings exceed the amount), equivalent to the charge for 100 second class ordinary return tickets. Mijymum charge £10. Evcnr sion trains will be run only, at the. option of tho Department,

There is ".money" in Australian pictures provided they tire by tlye' right hands. — Dr. Abbott, who from a suburban general • practice • has-, made his mark as a Sydney specialist,' has 'Von long a modest and .judicious collector of pictures. Apparently (the Sydney correspondent of the "Argus" states) he found his collections crowded out his space, for he has just brought some iof them to auction sale, and realised £2000 for them. The three Hildcrs naturally fetched good prices, and a Conrad Martens nearly as much as the best. Hilder. Conrad Martens is good property in the art world 7iow, though 20 years ago he was considered merely pretty and- trifling. Elliott Gruiier had one fine picture sotd. This young New Zealander also keeps his price up, und adds to it not only by the pure quality of his colour, 'line,' composition, and imagination but. because he dostroys about three in four of all the things he paints. He has no artistic vanity and after a few months judtfes his own canvases as if they were not his own. *

An unexpected visitor arrived at Auckland last Saturday in the Royal Dutch Packet steamer Van Clooni, which arrived to take in water. She is a passenger steamer of more than 4000 tons burden, coming from Macassar in Celebes, via Sydney, and was on her way to Valparaiso (Chile) and Callao (Peru). A message to her agents in Auckland stated that she has German and Austrian passengers on board. She was not cue to leave Sydney until early in the week, which ac* counts for her unexpected arrival.

At 1 the present time, when there is such an agitation for concrete roads, it is of interest to recall the fact that this is the centenary of the pioneer of modem roadmaking, Jdnn* Lo'iuloun i" Adam, a Scottish engineer.' It was he who introduced the system now known as ' ' macadamised ' ' roaiTS. He was voted £10,000 and offered a knighthood. He, however, declined the honour o% putting "Sir" before his name. A Roades Congress is now being held in London to discxiss the important question of highway consruction and maintenance.

T-hc question of using oil fuel instead of coal on the half a million tons shipbuilding programme oT the Cunard Line was explained by a high, official of ? the company to a Liverpool Evening News representative: — Most of the world's large ports have oil-loading appliances, aud a 20,000-ton liner could be bunkered in 12 hours instead of three to four and often more days. A 20,000-ton liner would burn about 3000 tons of coal from England to New York. With oil 1500 tons deadweight is saved, and there is « reduction of about 50 in the engine-room staff.

The Drama to be cwacted on December 17 is to be enlivened by a vaudeville turn performed by seven sportive planets in their famous conjunction act, accompanied' by a specially 1 'rranged tidal wave scent (says a cn?unicler in an exchange). A team of seven p/anets \s{ to have a' tug at old earth when she is not looking, being- preoccupied with the New Zealand elections. So says an American astronomer, and he is frightened a good many women of both sex.es. A Wellington telegram states that many people are even now down on their knees and some have gone the length of placing their valuables in greater security.

The bluegum is not regarded with so litle respect as it is in Australia . and New Zealand (says the San Francisco correspondent of the New Zealand Herald). ' The great railroad companies have immense plantations of cucalytus trees from which they draw their supplies of sleepers. There is scarcely a city or hamlet in' California without its streets of bluegums, but as it has been found that the roots displace the footpaths in their search for water, many are being felled. The representative of a Los Angeles firm has arrived in Tulare County to take charge of construction for his company of a large mill for the manufacture of eucalyptus 'products. It will use a tract of. 800 acres of eucalyptus timber, which has been purchased by an association of California druggists. Eucalyptus oil will be one of the principle products, and use will be made of the wood.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 11. 19.19. LABOUR AND ITS CRITICS., Grey River Argus\u000d\u000aand Blackball News, 11 December 1919

Word Count
2,717

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 11. 19.19. LABOUR AND ITS CRITICS. Grey River Argus\u000d\u000aand Blackball News, 11 December 1919

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