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THE PRICE OF MEAT.

EVERY New Zealander is aware that I a certain percentage of meat slaugh- J tered for export is rejected, not that , it is unfit for 'human consumption but tor various .other reasons. J?or instance light-weight mutton, old cow, etc. When one considers the number of cow s lji this country^ the annual 'slaughter must be immense. Are these rejects sold at a cheaper rate ior home consumption. than the pr^me bullock beef for consumption, abroad? New Zealand maintains a High Commissioner in London, and agents in various part s of the world to keep New Zealand informed of the state of , the markets for New Zealand produce. An excellent institution, but only a few materially benefit by it. viz.? the exporter, and these few have a won- i derful controlling power on all governments. A proposal has been made to effect a .remedy in some degree by tending to ensure that the producer shall receive the full market value of his produce, the New Zealand consumer shall not be un imduly exploited, and that New Zealand people shall have first call on New Zealand produce. The scheme is as f ollows :— (1) A New Zealand Produce Price Board to be appointed with executive power. (2) The High Commissioner and agents where New Zealand produce is imported, to keep the Produce Price Board informed periodically of the price realised for New Zealand produce i^ their various centres. (3) Every exporter of the value of £100 per month -or over to be compelled to maintain or be partners in a local retail business, dealing; in the produce exported. The extenf of such retail business to be determined by the Produce Price Board. (4) The Produce Price Board shall determine the local retail price of such produce, \consideraation eing given to. (a) price realised abroad ; (b) quality, prime or otherwise, whidli would form the base .for fixing the local price. (5) All retailers of exportable New Zealand produce to be supplied by the nearest exporter of such produce prices realised abroad, less export charges. Such 'requisitions to be governed by the Produce Price Board. With reference to fixing the price in New Zealand, the export charges are of immense importance at present. Consideration would have to be given to cost of cold storage, labour and wharfage at both ends, and refrigerated or ordinary freight abroad, and other incidental expenses in connection with exportation.

The Eev Canon Carr, the newly appointed vicar of Holy. Trinity Church, Gseymouth, accompanied by Mrs Carr and family, arrived from Nelson on Saturday evening. Canon Carr took up his duties yesterday, preaching his initial sermon at the morning service in Holy Trinity Church. The new Vicar stated that it was a difficult matter to follow in the footsteps of such a man as the Yen Archdeacon York, his pre_ decessor. He asked for the hearty co.operation of the whole of the parish ioners, to enable him to carry out the work of the church successfully in his new parish. Canon Carr specially re. quested that -any parishioners who knew of any sickness amongst mem. bers of the congregation, should at once communicate, with him. On Saturday night the new motor chemical fire engine, recently ordered by the Greymomuth Fire . Board, arrived "in town from Christchurch. The motor, which was obtained through Messrs Mark Sprot and Co, looks a very handy vehicle, and the whole turn out has quite a smart appearance There ft a hose reel, with a good length of chemical hose, mounted on the motor, as well as a set of ladders overhead. The cost of the motor, landed at Christchurch, was £235. 'The vehicle will seat a couple of men in front and others on the sidas. The chemical hydraulic engine has a capacity of thirty gallons, and there is 180 feet. of ; Jinch rubber hose. "There is also a union connection on the engine to en. able water to be applied from the main to fliish the machine. The engine, which came from Dunedin, was fitted on the motor by Mr Hunt, coachbuilder of Christchurch. The total cost of the engine will probably be about £400. The Fire Board has received considerable assistance in fitting it out from Superintendent Warner, of the Christ. church Fire Brigarde, to whom the Board at last meeting vofed a small pum in recognition of his good offices. The engine will doubtless make its ap. pearanee in the streets during the next few days, in order to give tho public an opportunity to become familiar with it, and thus ensure for it a clear run in case of fire. Fireman S. Oxenham,drove the engine on the overland jour.; ' ney to Greymouth,

A Government statement in the British Parliament is to the effect that it is hoped tho Peace Treaty will come into force to-morrow week.

It is stated in London that silver, which is now fetching 5s 6Jd per' ounce, will need to rise another lsd per ounce before the melting down of coins will prove profitable.

Two transports are due during the next fortnight, the Paparoa at Wellington on Thursday with 248 troops, 187 women, and 68 children, and the Arawa at Auckland on Friday week with 594 troops, 47 women and 14 children.

The next mail for Cook Islands. Tahiti. Penrhyn Island, Canada, the United States of America, Central America and West Indies, also United Kingdom and Continet of Europe, v»a San Francisco closes hero at 7.10 a.m. on Thursday next. A party of Greymouth gentlemen, who have just returned from a visit to Nelson, report having had a most .enjoyable trip during which they were most favourably impressed with the country round about Nelson, where the orchards and farms are jiist now look, ing in splendid order, though they could do with some of the plentiful rain supply we are getting in thils part of the country.

Quite a number of Greymouth people attended the funeral of the late James Colvin yesterday at Westport, which was participated* in by a large con. course. Messrs W. IT. Parfitt and E. ,T. Smith represented the Greymouth Borough Council and Mr J. McCarthy the County Council. Some of the visi n toiia got back to town last evening de_ -spite the heavy rain.

Amusement seekers are reminded of the grand euchre party and dance which takes place in the Citizens' Band Hall to-morr.ow (Tuesday) evening at eight o'clock. Three valuable and useful prizes will be offered for competition. A most enjoyable dance will be held after the supper interval, for which the music will be supplied by Miss Cochrane's orchestra. Roll up in numbers, and ask your friends to join you in passing away a pleasant evening.

A London cable states that Sir Chartes Gregory Wade, the New South Wales Agent-General, has been appointed a King's Counsel. It would be interesting to know whether he is getting ready secure some office that will enable to make room for Mr W. *A. Holman (New South Wales Premier) as Agent-General, should the letter lose the coming New South Wales elections.

According to the Napier Daily Te. legraph inquiries are to be made by the Technical College authorities with a view to securing young tobacco plants to grow in the Technical College agri. cultural plots. The matter was brought up at a meeting of the board of managers, and the suggestion was very favourably received.

A case that has been several times before the Warden at Reefton, in which the coal area known as Buchans was applied for by D. Absolem and party was at lrfst decided in applicants favour. The report regarding a previous hearing *of the 'ease, supplied to us from an apparently reliable source, proves on enquiry, to have contained a number of inaccuracies.

A large party of ladies and gentle. ( men left Greymouth yesterday morning by motor cars for Lake Kanieri. The tour had been Keenly looked forward to and everything had been well organ ised by the — except the weather. Being new to tlie Coast, this gentleman had been misled by last weeks' drought, and he assured the party that the weather conditions would be ideal for an outing. The foliage' round the lake wa s certainly fresh and green, . but the tourists are not at all enthusiastic as to the weather conditions. Eumour hath it that they intend to advertise for a new manager for the next tour with a, knowledge of West Coast weather con. ditions.

The late Mr. Colvin occupied many positions in Wcstport's public life. In the year .lß99, Mr. Colvin was return, ed at the head of the poll by a majority of 554 votes over his opponent Mr. P. J. O 'Regan. On a prior election Mr. Colvin had stood a s an Independ. ent and was beaten by Mr. O 'Regan. In the 1899 election, however, Mr. Colvin came out as a Liberal, and then had the support of the late Richard John Seddon. At the election in 1902, Mr. Colvin was again returned, and polled 3370 votes. He was a Minister if the Crown, having carried the Mines portfolio in the Mackenzie Ministry, at what time New Zealand was in the po. litical throes on the downfall of Lib. eralism and the changing of tide over to the affairs of Conservatism. In the later years of Mr. Seddon 's regime, Mr. Colvin was the Government "Whip," and it is on record that "Uncle", (as the late Mr. Colvin was termed by his political associates) on more than one occasion saved the Sed. don.Ward combination from political trouble by being alert at the correct juncture. When only 17, he went from Ireland and landed at Melbourne in 1861. He successfully followed goldmining for some time at Cresswick Creek, and at Daylesford, and in 1562 was attracted to New Zealand by the Otago gold fields; he went to the Dun. stan, and later to the Wakatipu, and afterwards removed to Invercargill. A year later he proceeded to the Wakam. arina, and started a stOTe. Mr. Colvin then went to Hokitika, and opened a store at Waimea. Later, he sold his business at Hokitika, and started in Grey .Valley. In 1876 /when the gold discovery at the Buller caused another stir ''amongst the miners, Mr. Colvin went to Addison's Flat, and in 1872 entered business at Westport. In 1883 he was elected to the Buller Coun. ty Council and served six years, and in 1890 was chairman of the Westport Harbour Board. He occupied a seat on the Nelson Education Board in 1894 Mr. Colvin has been an Oddfellow for many years and was connected -with the Westport Lodge, in which \e pas. sed through all the degrees. • In ad. dition to the above public services, Mr. Colvin also occupied the position of . Mayor of this town, and by virtue of his office was also a Justice of the Peace. '

A London, cable states that the official statistics show that the membership of the trades unions in Britain 'practically doubled during the Avar and is now 5,250,000.

Sister Moody Bell will shortly leave on a visit to England, sailing on January 20th.

Japan has ratified the Peace Treaty. America seems likely to be the last Power to ratify.

A statement of the officers, noncommissioned officers, and men of the New Zealand Expcdi*ronary Force who have returned to New Zealand up to September 30 gives the total as 75,803.

Mr T. M. Wilford will be, opposed for Hutt seat by a Labour and a Reform candidate, the latter beine Mr E. P. Rishworth, Mayor of Lower Hutt.

A Brussels cable says the Belgian government has forwarded to Paris HoO names of German civilians and soldiers charged with crimes during the invasion and occupation of Belgium,

An order for £5000 worth of e<*gs for overseas use could not be placed in Christchurch last week because of lack of shipping facilities.

Tlie British Government have announced that no inquiry into the Jutland battle is contemplated. It is admitted that an important document relative to the battle i s missing.

Lieut. J. M'Padden. on his return from the war, has taken up his former duties, as Director of the Reefton School of Mines.

- ■• «| A record price for bananas was ob. tamed at a sale by auction on Friday (says tho New Zealand Herald), when a choice line of ripe fruit brought 34s per case. This i s .equivalent to 54d per lb wholesale.

A London cable state that the House of Lords rejected a Government motion in favour of increased taxation by 52 votes to 13. They are very anxiou s to avoid anything iii the way of a leyjr on capital.

I intend to Tetire from the service at the end of December next, and there fore this is the last, annual report on the department which I ■ shall make (writes Mr. George Allport, Secretary of the Marine Department, in the an. nual report of the department);

Last nionth 28 steamers (of 13,220 tons) entered, and 31 steamers (of 15,289 tons) left the port of Greymouth. while one sailing vessel (699 tons) entered. The Customs revenue collected at this port Jast month "was -£2,056 14 S 9d, and the beer duty was £209 0s 6d,

Last year (up to April 30th) the number of sheep owners in New Zea<land decreased by 778. while the total number of sheep decreased 1,037,000, tlie figures being 25,828,554 of which over 14,000,000 were in the North Island, and over 11,500,000 in the South Island. In the Nelson-Westland district there were 1,385,870 sheep, owned by 2442 persons.

Eceently a young dairy farmer near Opunake (states the Stratford Evening Post) decided to marry. v On the wed. ding day he milked the cows as usual motored a distance of 36 miles and said "I will," and returned home by .motor with his bride in time for the 'evening '£' irfilking. ' Obliging neigh, hours, however, packed him off on a honeymoon.

An interesting table in the report of tho Prisons Department is that show, ing the average cost of prisoners' rations from 1909 to date. The figures indicate that his Majesty's prisons have not escaped the rising living cost. The figures are: — 1909, £10.55; 1910, £10.33; 1911, £10.15; 1912, £10.24; 1913 £10.91; 191-i, £11.79; 1915, £14.97; 1916 and 1917, £16.41; 1918, £16.64; 1919 £16.41. - - „ . •:. : >a _

Very many friends have learned with regret of the death of a very old and highly respected Brunner resident, Mrs Sarah Devlin, at the age of 87 years, after an illness .of several years' duration,. Deceased, who was a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, had resided 37 years at Brunner, where her husband predeceased her. There are left three daughters, Mrs J. Kennedy " (Greymouth), Mrs P. Magee (Greymouth). and Mrs P. Trehey (Brunner). Mr James Devlin (Brunner), brother in law. 17 grand-children.' and 9 great grand-children, toeether with nieces and nephews in New Zealand, Scotland, Ireland and the Un'ted States.

At the annual meeting of the Hokitika Bowling Club, the following officers were elected: — President — Mr Wm Wilson; Vice President, Mr B. S. Galbraith; Treasurer, Mr A. E. Benjamin ; Secretary, Mr J. N. Nalder; Committee — Messrs H. A. Thompson, W. O. Braddon. D. Stevenson. J. R. Hickson. J. H. Wilson, E. J. Lloyd, F. W. Feddersen, G. Blank. A. B. Boyd. and P. R. Stewart. The Duncan Cup was presented to Mr D. Stevenson (holder for previous year). The ,. report and overdraft of £374 19s lid. or £1 3s 4d less than the previous year. The chief expenditure was £30- for the caretaker, and £27 6s bank charges.

Lieut-Colonel B. E. Myers, C.M.G., a brother of the Hon. A M Myers, who has been resident in England for the past 20 years, returned to Auckland by the Eemuera recently, accompanied by Mrs.* Myers and their three daughters. Colonel Myers was practising as a con. ( suiting physician in London, and at the outbreak of war joined up with the R.A.M.C., in which he had a majority. At the request, of the authorities he transferred to the New Zealand Medical Corps, and was the first officer commanding the No. 2 New Zealand Hos. pital at Walton.on.Thames. He was later attached to London Headquarters as A.D.M.S., and after .eight months be came D.M.S. Colonel Myers will spend some months in New Zealand • before returning to England.

- There were 20 births last month in Greymouth, two marriages, and 11 deaths.

There was before the Full Court re. cently.(says the Dominion) a land ease involving an exchange of proprietors, and during the course of the hearing his Honour, Mr. Justice Hosking, remarked that he knew of ,a case up north where there were 40 or. 50 exchanges with respect to one property — in fact, there wort so many exchanges that counsel became perplexed and did not quite know how many changes there really were.

Agricultural production in the Union of South Africa is estimated as being worth approximately £70,000,000 yearly mining production is valued at over £52,000,000, and the value of the manufactured output is given a s just under £50,000,000. Agriculture is thus, as it always has been, the greatest industry in South Africa.

The summer months were ushered in on the West Cons* with a plenteous downfall of rain, the weather being also generally rather chilly for such a time of the year. Last month was a drier one than the same month of last year; there having been three inches less of rain. The figures were 9.48 inches, compared with 12.52 inches in October of 1918. The largest fall was on the 11th (1.85 inches), while rain fell on sixteen days.

A ease of mistaken identity was disclosed in connection with an affiliation' case heard in the Christchurch Magistrate 's • Court. Acting on a description furnished by the complainant, and perhaps misled by a similarity of names, the police had arrested a man at Timaru and brought him to Christchurch in custody. The Magistrate discharged the man, and cancelled an order for costs previously made against him.

Captain Tahu Rhodes ,of Christ, church, accompanied by Mrs. Ehodes, , and her sister, the Hon. Eileen Plunket returned to Auckland by the Re^iuera lately. Captain Rhodes was atlAened to General Godley's staff, and proceed, ed overseas with the General on the outbreak of war. He was at the land ing on Gallipoli, "and was later invalid, ed to England. He then joined his Tegiment, the Grenadier Guards, and remained with the regiment until September, 1918, going through all the engagements in France in which the Guards took part. Captain Rhodes paid a short visit to New Zealand at the end of last year, and rejoined his regiment in London, when the Guards Division returned from Germany. He has been seconded from his regiment, and will take up the- duties of m mili. tary secretary to the feovernor.General Lord Liverpool. It is no^gSitcrally known that pun. ishment f or^pettir dTimc ?oy exposure in the public sta&ls^was in vogue in New Zealand in the 'forties. There is said to have existed a pair of stocks near the old Thorndon Barracks in the mid.

die 'forties, and some of the old » resii dents can recall them being jjut^to • use. The clearest evidence, hoT^yct^ • titat stocks were used as a pumsrfmen^t is the discovery in an Auckland paper* of , 1846 of a letter protesting against "this degrading form of punishment." It seems 'that the practice was to con. duct the prisoner from the lock.up to the stocks for exposure every few hours, and whilst so exhibited the public were not prohibited from showing what they thought of the prisoner. B. Dixon, .Bookseller Oreymouth.— New books, Col. Librnrv; favourite authors. "Live stock «md management," by Primrose MVOonnell. 2s. Novelty Evenings, 2s: Oamdies and Bon Bons and how to make them. 4s I 6d. Home made sweets recipes, tried, ' Is 6d.— Advt. Great Opening Sale of Ladies, Ohildrons' and Gents Boots and Shoes T. J. Hodgson's £5000, Palmerston North stock bought at 16s in th e£. A clear saving of from 2s to 150 on eery pair of -boots and shoes if you buy. now. Don't fail to pay a visit of inspection^— McGruer andC 0.. Department Stores, Greymouth. — Advt. Big range of Ladies' Blouses in Silk Crepe de Chene, Georgette, Voiles etc.. all new goods and prices right. At Walkers', Boundary Street. — Advt. B. Dixon. B_ookseller. Greymouth. — " New books suitable for children's presents. Large assortment of latest toy books in paper or linen. New supplies Cole's Fnmny Picture Books. Child's Bible, illustrated in colours 2s 6d. Best stories from history, 9 S Gd. Illustrated. Best Fairy Stories. Illustrated. — Advt.

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Bibliographic details

THE PRICE OF MEAT., Grey River Argus, 3 November 1919

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3,444

THE PRICE OF MEAT. Grey River Argus, 3 November 1919

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