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RUNNING AMOK

INSANE CHINAMAN. AT SYDNEY. ISKVEXTKEX I'EOI'LE "WOUNDED. FOURTH EN HOURS' BOMBARDMENT. MANIAC SHOT~By"AN AMERICAN. ______ i SYDNEY, June 3. ; A Chinaman, said to have gone mad because he lost the -wnite girl with whom he had been living, ran amok on Sunday evening. He attacked n Chinese mission <?hurch first of all — ' throwing in smoke boxes and shooting the congregation as they rushed out — then he stood in the street and fired widly at a fire brigade as it dashed up to put out the suppose^ fire; and , then, shooting as he went, he. fled to his two-roomed hut in a nearby slum ( lane. He barricaded himself in, kept the army of police at bay all night, and was finally rushed and shot at . 9.30 on Monday morntng T>y a courage- J ous American from Arizona. It was au extraordinary incident, with a most : dramatic finish. Altogether, 17 persons were shot, , one seriously. ' The story is told; in the Sydney Sun ' of Monday evening: — Th(i encounter, whicTi was the only ; ofcurence of its kind that, has taken place in Sydney since a kanaka ran amok at Newton and killed Constable Wallace, was of th c most sensational . character, was full of incidents, both ; thrilling and humorous, from start to finish, and showed clearly that there is . still ample shelter for guerilla warfare - in some of the improved parts of the city. Armed with two revolvers, the Chinese maintained a regular reign of terror, and his career was not ended until shortly before 10 o'clock this morning by n revolver shot. Lee Sing, or Lee Sun, was the name of the mad Chinaman who finished his career with a great adventure. He is described as a cabinetmaker, and is said to have been o f. a peculiar disposition BOMBS IN CHURCH. Once before he disturbed the congre-l gation in the Church of Christ Chinese j Mission School, in Wentworth avenue, j l>y shouting and singing discordantly, and was put out of the place. . , Lafct night, about 7 o'clock, the congregation was assembled", when the 1 Chinaman threw a smoke bomb into the building. There was wild alarm. He threw two other bombs, and then' drawing his revolver, begau to fire immediately. His victims were numerous, and there were many marvellous escapes. Some of the congrega-, tion clambered out of the windows and got on the roof for safety. Then the madman took to the street, ••iml ran from Wentworth avenue into a lane off East street, where he held him (\rcfkj of citizens at bay, and exchanged shots with several armed' police. By 2 o'clock this morning he had winged more or less seriously 15 people,' and by 9 o'clock two more had

been added to the list of casualties treated at the hospital. THE CA.Si*Al .TIES. The following victims were attended to at SSydm-y Hospital: — Charles Sun (32), hawker, 41.1 i'itt Street, city, bullet wound in body. Ernest Linn (12), greengrocer," Military Road, Mosman, -wound in throat. Rosie Dyson (31), machinist, Dowling Street, Moore Park, abdominal injury. ' Willie Peterson (16), hospital attendant, Nithsdale Street, city, shot below knee. John Lee Ho, (33), grocer, Albion Street, Surrey Hills, wounded leg. David Young (3S), grocer, -Military Road, Mosman, injuries to face. Colin Tory, or Doxy (18V onlerman, Redfern Stroor, JJahmun, wounded leg. Ernest Martin (21), presscr, James Street, Redfern, 'wound in thigh. David Owen (28), railway fireman, Campbell Street, city, ,wounded knee. Isadore Goldberg (20), clerk. Dar- . linghultet Road, Darlinghurst, wound in right thigh. Vernon van Heekeren (17), driver, Princess Street Canterbury, wounded in left thigh. William Adams (40), labourer, West Street, Five Dock, wound in lower part of body. John Hennessey (33), railway fireman, East Street , Surrey ' Hills, wound in abdomen. William Jeffries (2S), driver, Leura, wound in right leg. Charles Honam (60), preon grocer, Military Road, Mosman, wound in right hip. Richard, Ford (24), member of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, wound in right arm. A LONG BATTLE. All last night, and up to 10 o'clock this morning, an enormous crowd surrounded the church and the building in -which, the Chinaman took refuge. So great were their numbers, in f:i«t. that the police and firemen were considerably hampered in their movements. There was a big posse of police und,er Inspector G. Walker, and while a number of them were trying to effect an arrest others endeavoured to keep I the surging crowds from the ianewuy | and iv front of the church. j All this time shots were being lired in the direction of the hunted man, i who had barricaded himself in a dilap- ■ idated 1 shed, where he kept up a cons' sistent fire upon the police and crowd. i Under the circumstance^, it was le- ' markable that no more than 17 per- j l sons were injured. HOSED BY FIRE BRIGADE. " When it was found that it was im- - possible to bring the Chinaman' down 3 th c fire brigade played several line s of hose on to the building, and in this , way managed to knock fljawn portion > of the partition which, sheltered him. 1 Even then the hunted man kept on - firing, and as he could not be seen it ■ was decided to endeavour to ilooil him out. It was during these operations i late this morning that two of the fire- ■ men were shot in the laneway. They were quickly removed by the civil

ambulance to hospital. HOW THE END CAME. Just about a quarter . to 10 this morning a returned, soldier named Ryan and Sergeant Smith, of the Regent Street. Police Station, and J). •Sterling, of 292 Victoria Street, who is -also a returned soldier, 'noticing that a portion of the builcliug was in si shaky condition, put their shoulders to it. .and it fell. Ryan is a nuggety Arizonian, who has seen many stirring scenes in his own country antf on active service. "Give me a gun," shouted the Ariy.onian to Inspector Walker. "I've done this in Arizona." "It's a dangerous thing to do," replied the inspector. "That's all right. I'm good with a gun," replied Ryan. He was given the revolver, and he sprang for the. window of the room. Constables W. Smith and Sergeant and Detective Leary covered the window, and made ready to follow and Inspector Walker also burst his bur-ley body through. Ryan and the polic c were met by two shots from the Chinaiuan, but the bullets missed their objective, and Ryan's first shot hit the madman in the jaw and crashed upward^ through the brain. "He dropped as dead as a herring,' said Inspector Walker. The body of the Chinese was taken by the civil ambulance to the Sydney Hospital, where life was pronounced extinct. It was then removed to the morgue. MIDNIGHT EXCITEMENT. While the shooting was in progress most exciting experiences befell many , people. About midnight a pony gal- ! loped, down Campbell • Street,, heading into the crowd, and it was thought that the Chinese had managed to get away through a lane and was coming towards the crowd. Somebody yelled that, he was out and there- was a rush for cover, bui the man was still sheltered. A little later a searchlight was flashed on the place where he was hid ing and directly its rays lit up the locality more shots came from the do niented man. But no one was in jurcd by this fusilade. Hurried consultations as to the l>esi way to tackle the madman without un necessary risk were held, but as tbi exact spot where h 0 was. hiding wai not ascertainable it was impossible t< anticipate his quick changes of posi tion. THE MADMAN'S DEFIANCE. The scene late this morning almos beggared description. x\ll night lonj hundreds of peopl c clung to the ap proaches of the Little Campbell Stree fastness. They could not be kep away. The whole neighbourhood re fused to go to bed. On verandah and balconies men, women, and child ren kept steady vigil. From 7 o'clock the crowds began ti augment. Lorries, carts, barrows motor cars, and behicles of all sort blocked the inai nthoroughfare, am when at about a quarter to 10 th madman was eventually overeom thousands of curious people had gath

civd on the spot. The water and Jiiud at Hie entrance to teast Street — a narrow opening oil* Campbell Street, might have conveyed ■ ,the impression that a groat lire had. boon in progress. For hours the Firo Brigade had been pouring tons oi: water into the frail wooden cottage where the madman was defying the ; . world. A few yards clown East Sireet a lane live or six feet wide opens to the 1 right, and half way down this lane stands the Chinaman's house on the left hand side, /with raised fcteps, giving it a command of the approaches on either hand. Thousands during the morning pass ed down this narrow alley running with water and mud to. visit the scenes of the capture. The city planning genius of a man could scarcely have provided a more .secure retreat' i'or a maniac- running amonk.

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RUNNING AMOK, Grey River Argus, 20 June 1919

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RUNNING AMOK Grey River Argus, 20 June 1919

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