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THE DERBY OF 1870.

[spouting life.J The numbers of the fifteen competitors were exhioited about half an hour before the racp, and the interval was employed in the arduous task of clearing the course. Ju3t before three o'clock, the several candidates began to emerge from the paddock, where all the competitors, excepting Macgregor and Kingcraft, were saddled, these two having had their toilets completed at Sherwood's stables. The first to show the way was Sarsfield, the Irish representative, next to whom came Bay Roland, Ely Appleton, Palmerston, Nobleman, •Cymbal, Bonny Swell, Camel, King o' Scots, and Normanby, Cockney Boy bringing up the rear. The preliminary canters were then taken, Nobleman leading the van, immediately followed by the favorite and the others in quick succession. Kingcraft, however, much to the surprise and disappointment of the onlookers, did riot take his preliminary cantor, but .made direct for the startingpost through the . furzes at half-speed gallop. At about a quarter past three, the field had got fairly under the starter's. orders, and they would have been speedily dismissed on their journey had it not been for the vagaries of, Cockuey Boy, who, probably through being unused to siich ' good company, displayed the greatest reluctance to join it. However, at twenty minutes past three, the signal was given, all getting off well, save Cockney Boy, who could not be induced to stir until he had been well whipped and spurred. The first to show in front was Palmerston, who took a clear lead, followed by Sarsfield, Macgregor,' Ely Appleton, Bonny Swell, and Camel, in the order mentioned.- When about 100 yards had been traversed, Palmerston was pulled back, and King of Scots took up the running, the fovourite still well to the fore, the Prince of Wales and Cymbal appearing most conspicuous of the remainder ; hindermost division being composed by Camel, Nobleman, Bonny Swell, Kingcraft, and Bay Roland, Cockney Boy toiling on a long distance behind all. After going about a quarter of a mile, Cymbal retired to the rear with Kingcraft, and at this point Cockney Boy coming into collision with a man, tumbled and threw hia rider. The brute was, however, quickly remounted, and urged on again at his best pace. .As they went through the furzes, King o' Scots was discerned holding a clear lead, with Palmerston, Macgregor, and Prince of Wales in close attendance, . Muster and Kingcraft still occupying rewarded positions. Emerging full into sight, the leading division appeared to be running in compact order, but on descending the hill of Tottenham Corner, King o' Scots fell back beaten, and Palmerston assumed the lead, followed immediately by Bonny Swell, while Macgregor and Prince of Wales still lay handy. At the same moment, Muster and Kingcraft began to work their way to the front, the latter, in performing this movement, having to bo taken round on the outside to avoid a scrimmage with Sarsfield, Camel, and Ely Appleton. Palmerston and Bonny Swell continued to

hold the lead as they made the turn, while Kingcraft on 'the lower ground, and Muster on the Stand side, drew into more forward positions. Entering the straight, Prince of Wales was beaten, and Bonny Swell simultaneously retired from the front. The lead was now held by Palmerston and Muster alternately, with Macgregor next, splitting the pair. About a quarter of a mile from home, Fordham commenced riding the favorite, and was hard at him ; but all his jockey's efforts failed to keep him in position, and eventually he "crocked," much to the joy of the fielders, who hailed his defeat with loud shouts. The race now became apparently a match between Pahnerston and Muster, both vigorously ridden, and struggling for the mastery stride for stride. As they neared the distauce, however, French gave Kingcraft his head, and he was soon half a length in front of the other two, whilst at the commencement of the Grand Stand enclosure the son of King Tom fairly quitted his opponents, shooting out and winning in a canter by four lengths ; a ueck separated Pahnerston and Muster. Macgregor was a moderate fourth, Bonnie Swell fifth, Sarsfield sixth, Prince of Wales seventh, Ely Appleton eighth, Normanby ninth, Camel tenth, King o' Scots eleventh, Cymbal twelfth, Bay Roland next, and Nobleman last. Cockney Boy walked in about a quarter of an hour after the race had concluded. Time,. as taken by Benson's Chronograph, 2miu 45sec. Nett value of the stakes, L 6175. Kingcraft ran nine times as a two-year old, his first appearance being in the Ascot Triennial Stakes, for which he was beaten by a head by Mahonia. He then won six times in succession, as follows : — Chesterfield Stakes, Newmarket July Meeting, Ham Stakes, Goodwood, Convivial Stakes, York August, Buckenham Stakes, Newmarket First October Meeting, Triennial Produce Stakes, and at the same meeting walked over for the October Produce Stakes. His next race was the Middle Park Plate, in which he ran third to Frivolty and Sunshine, a head only separating the three. His last race as a two-year old was the Criterion, at the Honghton Meeting, resulting thus : — Hester first, Sunlight second, Kingcraft third ; won by a length, four lengths between second and third. No Derby winner ever came in for a greater share of cheering, and the applause was wonderful. Over-joyed fielders threw high into the air their many-colored hats, the great crowd of people went almost wild with excitement, and never was owner,, trainer, or jockey made' the subject of a more popular demonstrations. Lord Falmouth has never before owned a Derby winner, although he has been credited with the One Thousand Guineas in 1862 with Hurricane, and the Oaks in 1863 with Queen Bertha.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/GRA18700903.2.18

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY OF 1870., Grey River Argus, Volume IX, Issue 722, 3 September 1870

Word Count
947

THE DERBY OF 1870. Grey River Argus, Volume IX, Issue 722, 3 September 1870

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