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NEWS OF THE DAY

Domain Bill. —As will be seen from our telegrams, the Domain Bill has been thrown out in the Upper House by the casting vote of the Speaker. .... Footpaths in Lyttelton. —The footpath along Norwich Quay, in places, and before the Post Office, going to the railway, is in a disgraceful state, and totally unfit for ladies.

Kaiapoi Ploughing Match. —A general meeting of the committee is advertised to be held on Monday evening, at the Kaikanui Hotel, to receive the report and balance sheet, and it is intended also to formally present the cup prize for the best team.

Ashburton Court op Petty Sessions. —Some time since a memorial was forwarded to his Honor the Superintendent, requesting the establishment of a Court of Petty Sessions in this district. Mr Alfred Saunders, the acting R.M. here, recently received a reply from his Honor, stating that the memorial would be forwarded to the Colonial Secretary, and holdings out hopes for the speedy establishment of such a Court. Mr Stephen B. Poyntz has, in the'meantime, been appointed clerk to the Magistrates here.

Ashburton Domain Board. —A meeting of the above was held at their offices on Tuesday, the 4th instant; present, Messrs J. Grigg and R. Miller. A letter was read from the Secretary for Public Works regarding grant of £250, and the clerk was directed to write, applying for the amount to be paid to the credit of the Domain Board at the' Bank of New Zealand, Ashburton, A letter was also received, altering boundary of Domain, A plan for laying out the Domain was laid on the table, and the walks were ordered to be pegged out. Theatre Royal. —The Smith Combination Troupe had a very good house last evening, when the programme was gone through very satisfactorily. A novelty in the performance —the talking-head —was excellently done, and the DeOastro Family and Mr Vose were loudly and deservedly applauded. Young England’s daring feat of Hying from the dress circle to the stage was accomplished excellently each time, both backwards and forwards. ’To-morrow Mr Vose takes his benefit, and we hope to see a good house. Canterbury Horticultural and Arboricultural iSociBTY. —A meeting of the members was held last'evening at the Clarendon Hotel, Mr W. Norman in the chair. There was a good attendance of members. The schedule of prizes lor the ensuing two shows was brought up by the sub-committee, approved of and adopted, and the secretary was instructed to have them printed. A large number of special prizes were also announced, and any one intending to give additional special prizes was requested to give notice to the secretary during the ensuing week. It was resolved that the secretary receive two per cent of the income of the society, as payment for his services. The secretary-announced that tickets of membership would be issued during the week. The meeting then adjourned.

Gaol Returns.— The following was the state of her Majesty’s gaols in Canterbury, during the month of July -.—Lyttelton—For trial at the Supreme Court, 6 ; undergoing hard labor, 102 ; imprisonment, 2 ; lunatics, 3 ; debtors, 9 ; total 122. Discharges—Tried at the Supreme Court, 0 ; tried before the Magistrates, 31 ; lunatics, 3 ; debtors, 7 ; total 47. Addington—Undergoing hard labor, 47 ; imprisonment, 6 ; lunatics, 1 ; total 54. Tried before the Magistrates, 26; lunatics, 1 ; total 47. Timaru—Undergoing hard labor, 22 j imprisonment, 1 ; lunatics, 3 ; total 26. Tried before the District Court, 1 ; tried before the Magistrates, 10; lunatics, 3 ; total 14,

Entertainment. —An entertainment to commemorate the opening of the new school in connection with the West Christchurch Educational District, will be held this evening The programme comprises vocal and instrumental pieces, recitations, &c. During the evening addresses will be delivered by Mr C. C. Bowen, chairman of the Board of Education, and Mr H. J. Tancred, chairman of the district school committee. The Late Signor Mongini. The « Athenaeum,” speaking of the popular tenor, whose decease we mentioned last week, says : —Little surprise can be felt at his premature decease. Gifted with one of the finest tenor voices ever heard, he contracted an early habit of taking strong stimulants before singing. Under such a system his style became thoroughly vitiated. During his engagements last year both at Drury Lane and Covent Garden he had a few redeeming moments in the characters he undertook. He sang during the past winter season at Cairo, but his appearance were rare, and Siugor Fancelli was his substitute in the leading parts. I.O.G.T.—The number of Good Templars in the city, as well as in the province, is rapidly increasing. Last evening, in the long room at the rear of the new Oddfellows’ Hall, Lichfield street, a new lodge was instituted by the Rev Bro Westbrook, District Deputy Right Worthy Grand Templar, and another will be instituted this evening at the old Oddfellows’ Hall, both being branches or offshoots from the Hope of Christchurch Lodge. Nineteen members joined by clearance card, and six new members were initiated. Many visitors were present from other lodges. The following individuals were elected to office for the next three mouths, and installed, viz., W.C.T., Bro J. M. Watt ; W.V.T., Bro Duncan; W.S, Bro Abel; W.F.S., Bro Fraser ; W.T., Bro Bailie ; W.C., Bro Judd ; W.M., Bro Fulton ; W.1.G., Bro Calderwood; W. 0.5., Bro A’Yard ; W.R.H.S., Sister J. Fulton ; W.L.H.S., Sister Brown ; W.A.S., Bro Borland ; W.D.M., Bro Swift; P.W.C.T., Bro Gavin. Bro Gavin was recommended as Lodge Deputy. This new lodge received the name of the Southern Cross of Christchurch, and will hold its weekly meeting on Friday evenings, in the old Oddfellows’ Hall, Lichfield street, where members of the order holding clearance cards from other colonies, or from the old country, are invited to attend, or others desirous to join the order. During the recess in the middle of the session, refreshments were provided for the members and visitors by a few friends.

The Forests Bill. — A correspondent of the “New Zealand Herald,” writes“l read with great interest your article of this morning on this new-fangled forestry, as they call the art of preserving the .bush or planting out .new trees to replace the old. While the Government are talking so well on the one hand, let me tell you in a few words that they are at the present moment the greatest destroyers of timber in the province, and are doing it more injury than all the bushmen together. I refer to the regulation that only “ split ” sleepers of heart of kauri shall be used for the railways. It is painful in the extreme to witness the frightful waste and destruction which this practice is causing. All the outer parts of the log are made useless, and the heart itself by this rude and wasteful process, is more than half wasted. It is all very well for Mr Vogel to bring down a great pile of reports on forests in Europe, which I see were obtained by the Governor from the Colonial Office in Loudon for the express purpose of enlightening the Legislature. It would be more to the purpose if they would send some one out to see what is actually being done in New Zealand. They would not then allow their own contracts to be the greatest source of destruction to that they express themselves so anxious to preserve.”

Sunnyside Asylum.— Yesterday afternoon Mr Smith, in the kindest manner possible, placed the services of his company at the disposal of Mr Seagcr, for the purpose of an entertainment to the patients, and they thoroughly and' completely enjoyed'themselves. The hall was filled with patients and their friends, and from the pleased looks in the faces of all, and the hearty manner in which they recognised the efforts made to amuse them, there can be no doubt they will long remember the visit of the artistes. The programme was a very good one. Mr Vincent sang several of his best songs, the clever De Castro family, ineluding Mr and Mrs De Castro, went through their feats much to the delight of the audience, who especially .applauded the children. Mr Vose introduced his two friends, Mrs Chatterbox .and Robin, and the latter gentleman. . caused roars of laughter by his witty allusions to, several of the notables of the. Institution,, his colloquy with Mr Morris, .the M,0., especially. Mr Saunders played a harp, solo and also presided at the piano. ..At the conclusion of the performance, Mr Morris, on behalf of the patients, presented Mr .Smith with an address signed by all,. thanking him for his kindness in again coming, to spe them, and introducing to them such .talented ladies and gentlemen as those who had come up that afternoon to amuse them, Mr Morris concluded his address, by thanking the company on behalf of the inmates of Sunnyside, for the pleasant afternoon they had given them. • Mr Smith, who was loudly called for, then stepped forward and .said he thanked them most heartily for this mark of their appreciation. It was a labor of love to him, and he was sure it. was the same.to the ladies and gentlemen of his company to come out and amuse them, and if ever he came to Christ-; church again with a; company, which he hoped to do, he would most certainly again pay them a visit. We may mention that one of the female patients has forwarned to Mr Smith, as a slight recognition. ,of his kindness, a very handsomely worked cushion, accompanied by the following letter from the steward, Mr, Seager Sunnyside Asylum —Sir : I beg.you will accept the little pre-

sent sent herewith, as a small token of the esteem, and regard, of the patients for-the kind way you. have always considered them on your visits to.. Christchurch. 1 beg to assure you that suqli kindness as ,shown by you is never.. erased from the memories of those here ;. it is long talked of and referred to long after,, helping to cheer and enliven what would ,otherwise be a blank in'their existence. If circumstances should prevent your again, yisiting Sunnyside, I beg to assure you that you will be enabled to look back and know that,you have been the means of affording recreation to those who are afflicted with the direst malady and who are unable either to amuse themselves or contribute to that of others With best wishes for your future prosperity, I remain, yours truly, R, W. Bearer, Superintendent.” i

Exploration of Terra del Fuego.— A French party, “ armed to the teeth,” are exploring Terra del Fuego, their leader being M, Pertuiset. They landed early in December, and advancing toward Cape Horn, their first discoveiy was a lake of great beauty from twelve to fifteen miles in circumference, and covered with thousands of wild fowl. To this was given the name of the leader of the expedition. M, Pertuiset has not experienced in the Puegians that ferocity ascribed to them by the Chilian colonists of Punta Arenas. On the contrary, he reports very favorably of his relations with them. Far from attacking him, they have on all .occasions besought his friendship. He believes that they are not cannibals except when reduced by absolute want of food to the necessity of eating each other. At the date of the last advice, January 23rd, M. Pertuiset had returned to Punta Arenas. The caravan had advanced 300 kilometres (about 188 miles) towards the south, having taken about a menth for the journey. Immense plains and vast pastures, very suitable for the rearing of cattle, had been discovered. The temperature had proved gentle, and the floral richness and variety of the country are described as being extreme. M. Pertuiset speaks specially of groves of cinnamon trees and fuchsias and a species of wild camellia. Birdshooting had proved sufficiently productive and an important source of food supply for the travellers, who had at one time been reduced to the necessity of eating one of their horses. M, Pertuiset is at present residing at Punta Arenas, after which he intends to prosecute his discoveries.

Messrs Blackwood, of Edinburgh, have just published a volume of poems by George Eliot, Several of the smaller poems are published for the first time.

Messrs Christie and Manson has been engaged for seven days in selling engravings from Sir Edwin Landseer’s works. The total proceeds amounted to nearly £78,500. Messrs Agnew are said to have bought £40,000 worth of the sketches. The “ Times ” publishes an interesting ac-; count of the means by which the Khedive prevented the closing of the Straits of Suez. M. de Lesseps, who at first expected to have everything his own way, was told that the Khedive would obey the Sultan’s order, and means were immediately taken to carry out the threat. The Egyptian Controller, an Englishman, ordered the blue flag to be raised in place of the tricolour, General Stone: sent troops to Port Said and Ismailia, war-steamers were stationed at Suez and in the Bitter Lake, and the lights, buoys, <fec., were protected by armed force. M. de Lesseps accordingly yielded, it may be partly to promises, but it is quite clear that the Khedive understood that he had received one of the-few orders which he must obey or be deposed. 5 i

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Globe, Volume I, Issue 58, 6 August 1874

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2,211

NEWS OF THE DAY Globe, Volume I, Issue 58, 6 August 1874

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