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THE CALL.

COMES TO NEW ZEALANDERS

VOLUNTEERS WANTED.

ENTHUSIASM IN THE CITY,

THE KING'S MESSAGE.

AND THEN A DECLARATION

Wellington, Augusth 5. The announcement made this morning that the Governor would read a Proclamation from the steps of the old Parliament Buildings at 3 o'clock

brought together a crowd numbering

several thousands who extended over the spacious grounds and into the neighbouring streets. The porch of the building was crowded with Members of Parliament and Government officials. Punctually at the appointed hour his Excellency arrived, accompanied by the Premier, the other Ministers being in close attendance.

The following was the King's message: "I desire to express to my people of the Oversea Dominions with what appreciation and pride I have received the messages from their respective Governments during the last few days. These spontaneous assurances of their fullest support recall to me the generous sell-sacrificing help given by them in the past to the Mother Country. I shall be strengthened in the discharge of the great responsibilities which rest upon me by the confident belief that, in this time of trial my Empire will stand united, calm and resolute, trusting in God."

Lord Liverpool, who said he had sent a suitable reply, then read a cable message from the Secretary of State for the Coolnies: "War has broken out Avith Germany."

No sooner was tins announcement made than a wild burst of cheering broke out. A verse of the National Anthem was sung, and cheers followed cheers for several minutes. When quiet was restored the crowd was addressed by the Premier., who was greeted wtih cheers.

Premier Massey said: I trust that we are all of one way of thinking— that the British people and the Empire are to-day face to face with the most serious" crisis ever experienced in the history of the Empire and we are confident that we shall come through successfully. ~ That we will be called upon to make sacrifices goes without saying, but I am confident that those sacrifices will be made individually and collectively jmd willingly and in a manner in accord with the highest traditions of our race and the Empire to which we belong. We must do everything possible to protect our country and at the same time to assist the Empire. When we have done all that mortal man can do the rest may be left to the Higher Power, "Him Who watches over Israel and slumbers not nor sleeps." My advice at the most trying moment is to' keep cool, stand fast, do your duty to New Zealand and to the Empire. Sir Joseph Ward said: I believe firmly that out of evil good will arise. Everyone recognises tho horrors of war, but a time arrives in the affairs of nations as of individuals when they must fight in defence of honour and fox - their existence, when blessings of peace have to be foregone and all grief that sacrifice of human life entails has to be borne 'with fortitude and resignation. The loss of treasure will be stupendous, but that is a secondary consideration. Tho British Empire is entering upon the greatest crisis in her history. Her rulers have done nothing to provoke or precipitate war. On the contrary, they have done all humanly possiblevto avert it. It is impossible in my opinion for Great Britain to stand aside and to let powerful friendly nations go on without her taking part. May God bless and protect British forces on land and sea and make them victorious, is my earnest prayer.

Those sentiments were greeted with another outburst of cheering, and again the National Anthem was sung, the crowd slowly dispersing evidently impressed with the seriousness of the intelligence just conveyed to them.

THE CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS. The Defence Department has decided to register the names of persons desirous of serving for local defence in New Zealand, and if required later, for service abroad. Applicants may be serving Territorials, members of the general training section, or civilians, and must be between the ages of 20 and 35 years. Preference will be given to single men. Officers of the Territorial Force, Unattached List "B", and Reserve oi : Officers may volunteer. All ranks will be required to pass medical examination on Leing called up for service. No one will bo accepted whose height is under sft.4in and whose weight exceeds 12st. Pay and allowances will be the rate paid to the New Zealand Territorial Force when in annual camp. The horses of selected mounted volunteers will be inspected, and if found fit will be valued and purchased by the Government, whose absolute property they will become. Detailed orders for the assembly of men selected will bo issued through the Defence Staff.

All applications from Territorial Volunteers will be made by those wishing to volunteer through their Squadron, Battery, and Company Commanders to tlieir Regimental Commander and Brigadier, and in the case of the general ..training section and civilians, through Area Sergt.-Majors to Group Officers, by whom they will be forwarded to District Headquarters. Those volunteering under the latter category should register in tbn first instance with any of the following: — vSergt.-Major Morrison, Garrison Rail, Wangamii. Sergt. -Major Brighting, Defence Office, Marton. Sergt.-Major De Loree, Defence Office, Taihape. Sergt.-Major Wray, Defence Office, Feilding. Sergt.-37ajor 8011, Defence Office, Coles' Building, Palmerston N. Sergt. -Majo*r Davidson, Defence OHico, Loviii. Tlic GononiJ Officer Commanding has given leave to frontiersmen to participate in any special Territorial drills under local Territorial officers, should tlioy so desire. The Government will be glad to receive, gifts of horses for any force that may leave New Zealand,' but it must be understood that every horse used in the event of the force going abroad will be the absolute property of- the Government, to be used as the Government chooses. Horses not presented will bo paid for by the Government. Fiiten direct commissions are offered in tho British Army to New Zcalamlers. Conditions of' qualifications are: Candidates to bo between the ages of 20 and 25, unmarried, and to prfss a. qualifying theoretical examination and medical examination, at Wellington. Military experionoo not essential, but desirable. Candidates must be suitable in every respect, and be recommended as likely to make a, .suitable officer. Passing the examination will not guarantee a commission. Candidates should make immediate application, to be accompanied by a certificate as to moral character by a clergyman or headmaster.

The force to be mobilised, which will include all troops in Wellington district, will concentrate at Palmerston, and probably camp at the racecourse.

Nearly everybody is liable to uric acid trouble, and yet many persist in disregarding the first signs—pains and swellings in the joints, stiffness and soreness in tlio muscles. These symptoms show that the liver and kidneys are not doing their work properly—excess uric acid is accumulating in the blood. This uric acid may accumulate for a long time without serious trouble. But as soon as you are run down or exposed to cold or damp, it will surely assert itself. This excess acid must be removed, and the one remedy that will do it is RHEUMO. Rhoumo neutralises and eradicates the excess and leaves the blood free suid pure. Thousands have been cured by this wonderful remedy. Read how RHEUMO cured Mr Mat. Crannitch, the popular proprietor of tlio Temuka Hotel, well known throughout Canterbury. "For a long time I suffered from Rheumatism, using all kinds of remedies Hearing of RHEUMO I tried it. I have not felt better for the last ten years, and I can honestly say that RHEUMO in my case has been a great success." Act now. Get a bottle of RHEUMO to-night from your chemist or storekeeper. 2s 6d and 4s 6-1. ALWAYS GIVES RELIEF. "Ever sinceo my son Reggie was twelve months old I have given him Chamberlain's Cough Remedy for croup," says Mr Joe Stephens, Warren, N.S.W. "No matter how bad the attack may lie, after a few doses of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy he lias always boon relieved. I have reRemedy to dozens of people, as I consider it the best remedy for croup o rcokls, and would not be wtliont a bottle m the house." Sold by all chemists and storekeepers.

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THE CALL. Feilding Star, Volume XI, Issue 2411, 6 August 1914

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