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AVIATORS IN PERIL.

APV-iNT! ill. XB.AIt TURKISH POST'S. a i; (■;m,\iHvAßeLi-i rkm i'i-i. .O'di. hi! R.-C’i.t ter with the first Australian Force.) CAIRO. January 8. A erni-.r watching a certain part of the Ttnibsb co.i-t line sent out a seaplane with a Fi'i’iicli pili.t and (,'aptaiu Stirling, of tilo Flying Corps, as observer. The "plane" tb-w over a wide, rocky desert into a valley -lint in by high, barren mountain-. It was found that Tnikish post, exi-lcd hi Ilia di-trict. The seaplane ro-e aniong.it the bills, but when 2u miles nil,nek and at, a height of o.OCOIt, the engine -topped. Tim situation was preear'ou-. a., a seaplane cannot land -aiedy -o.c’-pt in v.at’-r. A jiatcli of sand was vi-;b!c far below amongst, some rocks, and lie.- Frenchman steered for it. Me ma.de a magnificent volplane lowanr;--the eat tli. and turned of: the magneto in order to |eevent lite, 11” then banked up the nun-bine again-t the wind, so as to check it- speed, and finally, striking still air, the seaplane fell .- wittly toward- the

.Oik- moment the floats touched the -mid the. tail 'I ilk' leadline was thrown l (i. The Frenchman t was hurled clear, lint Captain -Stirling was pinned down, •» ith his legs hunt ov.-r i.is spine, Petrol soaki d Ins clothe.-, ram. anil hair, hut fortunately did not catch lire lie call; I out to the Frenchman. 'ml the latter did not reply. Presently Stirling called again, and the cry brought the stunned Ftenehnimi to his senses. lie extricated Stirling, and the two started to return, tho Frenchman leaning on. Stirling.

Afttr they had covered four miles in four hours the. Frenchman complained of internal pain,, and was forced to give up. .Stirling gave him half a chocolate and all tho water he had. and then went on alone. He walked 16 miles in four hours. Tho country was bristling with rocks, and Turks wore often in view. A horseman with a dog, who was scouting out from Ins paity, approached to within 100 yds. Stirling lay in the shadow of a bush. The horseman stopped and shouted to a distant party. Stirling thought he had been discovered. and crept back along a rocky ledge to a marsh. When night came on ho crept through the Turkish camp fires to water, being desperately thirsty, but expecting momentarily to tie seen. Finally be reached the coast, only to find that the cruiser

had gone. The captain, knowing that an accident had happened, as the .aviators were hours overdue, had pub out to sea. Stirling slept in a hiding [dace, and when he woko it was still dark. He heard the cruiser returning, and rilled out. Those on the cruiser heard him, and flashed a searchlight. SHrl’ng appeared, end was taken off. ■ A strong parly, with gnus, searched for the Frenchman til! morning, but failed to liud him. and gave no hope. Tito captain felt an intense conviction that the airman would yet he finnd. and bo urged a return to search a particular portion of the beach. He turned the ship hack, and when the point was reached lie Hashed a light. The beam showed up some huts on the rocks near the shore. From one of those staggered the figure- of the Frenchman. The story, winch L unquestionably true, is one of the nio.-.t wonderful in the history of aviation.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150122.2.14.5

Bibliographic details

AVIATORS IN PERIL., Evening Star, Issue 15707, 22 January 1915

Word Count
563

AVIATORS IN PERIL. Evening Star, Issue 15707, 22 January 1915

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