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CRICKET NOTES

[By Wallaby.] POSITIONS OF TEAMS TO DATE. —First. Grade. —

Though the sky was overcast, no rain fell on Saturday afternoon. Generally speaking, tho wickets were good, though batsmen did not- in many cases take advantage of tins.

Those viVitors to the North Ground who stayed to Me the finish of theOpoho-Grangc match were rewarded with an exhibition of fighting cricket that was quite exciting The average rate- of scoring in this match, was—Egt the North Ground—slow. It was not all "stodgy" batting, though—not by any means. J, Graham, and Topple, for instance, were lively enough for anything, while Ingram, despito the fact, that when he went in things wero looking serious for bits side, bit freely.

Eckhold, who opened the innings witii Chadvvick, ph.ye<t his natural safe game for 31, in which figured only one boundary hit ; but- his partner, Henderson, Boherts, and .Roast all went for less than double figures, and five were down for 50. If was then that J. Graham and Popple- got together and began to hit tho bowlers, being especially severe on Eekhoff. two sieeesslve overs from this bowler producing 23 runs. The balls were rising a bit, and with the wicket-keeper standing back, there wan 'ittle risk in going out, and hitting them. Most of the hits were to longon and leg. and gradually the field deepened until they looked scarcely within hailing distance. The same thing happened during part of the Opoho innings, C. Bceby at one time being placed beyond tho southern end of the Albicn wicket.

Casey was getting on a bit of pace and. making them fly & little, was awkward all tho iim-c. Be curie out with remarkaWy nood figures—eight for 41 off 17 ovem t-Tckhoff, who also howled through the in. nings, was not so successful as usual, and finislicd with two for 60. The two K's—Kenny and Kilgour—who opened for Opoho, made a fair start, but were very slow. After they were disposed of, Evans. Davidson, Taylor, and Casey (the latter getting three 4's in a total of 16) followed quickly, and six wickets were down for 48. Then ensued a very useful partnership between Timlin and Ingram, who took the score to 86, or within 28 of the required number. Brown added nothing, and Eekhoff was sent in to try to knock up the runs, Alas! the genial Bert was out of luek, for Graham's first ball clean bowled him, and nine were down for 89. At this stage matters looked pretty hopeless for Opoho, but the wicket of Moore, the last man. was not to ba got so easily, and as Ingram continued to pile on the runs the excitement increased in the pavilion, where the Opoho players and supporters walked from door to window', from window to door endeavoring to keep cool, while the yells of the small boy barraekers for Grange grew less shrill and less jubilant as the score mounted. Finally a prolonged cheer and burst of hand-clapping following a hit for four by Moore proclaimed that- Opoho had won. The bunch of small hoys melted away, arid went home to tea.

ft was a good sporting finish, and I n gram and Moore deserve credit tor their stand. They were both fortunate in that several uppish hits fell clear •>{ the field, but in a finish such as this one side or the other usually have the luck. Just before the runs were got Ingram might have been caught by A. Graham at deep mid-nff, but the fieldsman misjudged the ball and tailed to reach it in time.

Except for one over from Kcasr.. off which b runs were scored, .i. Oraham and Kekhohl bowled unchanged, find considering that the innings lasted two hours, and that both the players named had previously been ;i.t the wh-keis lor a considerable time ami made s, or-s. they were bowling with remarkable steadiness at the finish.

The fielding all round was very good. I liciti'-ed one brilliant: bit of work by Taylor (Opolio), which would have accounted for Cvaham but that the howler (Kckhoff) had not time to get behind the wickets to take the return.

There was a big crowd watching the Albion-Colts match. They had conic in anticipation of seeing Crawford get. going again with the bat, and were not disappointed.

It will l>e remembered that at their previous meeting Albion gave the White Caps a good mil lor it: but on Saturday there was never any doubt as to the result.

Of the first nine Albion batsmen only Binney reached double figures, and he got 14 in his usual solid style. Binney, by the way. would do well to liven up between the wickets. He loses a lot of possible runs by his sedate method of covering the 58ft between the creases. Frank 'Williams just escaped reaching double figures, a bumpy one from Crawford, whieh came back sharply, being steered into Calland's hands in the slips. Eight wickets were down for 47, but Strang and E. Williams put on 20 for the ninth, and Williams and Bob Shepherd 15 for the last wicket. These last two shaped well for 15 not out- and .11 respectively.

(.'raw ford and (.btUutid bowled unchanged, tho former ueltiut; live for 2-9 and the colt five for 40. Ura.w ford's fast ones wore too much for most of (ho batsmen, many of -whom were beaten »y halls tiiat just missed the, wickets, 'flu- uiie that h-'.dtled Bill Johnston'*, h.sjhin.iions was a perfect "bailer"—a beautiful ball. Oaliand preserved a, very jrood length, but '"did" not-liiiii,' to speak of, which shows that straight, gne,d-lenc;i hj bowlin;- can

get a, lot of our senior i.atsiuon .out J. Shepherd, who .has noi lt.cn ieeliiig too w<'U far some lime past, «'.id not play on Saturday, but slood umpire, Cvawford therefore sent in Harden with Chadwick to open the innings. The youicr Opoho player failed to get however, and was out from rather a. poor ■stroke to cover, Binne/y taking the ball one-handed over his head. another colt who is usually placed late on the lis!, had no hick either, be in;; easily run out off a stroke by Chadwick. which was well fielded arid returned by Shepherd. Soon afterwards, Chadwick was can edit for 16, and three wickets were, down for 27. Chadwick had batted nicely, and had just, begun to open out when he was caught. It is worthy of note that this younjj; player has only missed making double figures twice this season, mid has on five occasions made scores of between ~>o and 60. Bell and Ketr put on 30 for the faiir'.h wicket, but the former missed a lot of let; stuff, and was not quite so wund a.s usual, while fverr, though uettinc; some very sweet off-strokes in his 4.1. put too ninny up in the air, and made tome very awkward attempts at lew play. Nevertheless, these two played useful innings, and the young St. Kilda, player should benefit lull is success in this jjara?. There is nothing like making n, respectable .store to instil confidence into a batsman.

Crawford, who followed Bflll, began very cautiously, - playbu: himself in in the same manner as on the previous Saturday. and was quite a ffmo getting tdx Hvst

10 runs. Once he had gob -a. good sight, of the ball, however, the runs began to come steadily. He did not hustle for singles off hie own bat or make- any great effort to secure 3 when 2 could be got with less exertion. On the other hand, he was keen to make every possible run for his boys. Lnrtxl by the, short' boundary at the Sb. David street, end, the coach presently began to operate, first on Jim Market, then on !•'.. Williams. It was- evidently " Crawford's visiting day," for he sent his visiting card—in the form of the ball—into thrc-o of the houses in St. David street. First it landed full on the door of No. 51. bringing the occupants out to see who had knocked. It next " rat-tatted "at No. 29, while, a minute or two later No. 33 was visited. Xo doubt forgetting his previous cui.il, Craw-ford, a little while afterwards, again announced himself at No. 53, tho lady of tho house appearing at the door to protest—not unnaturally—at this violation of the laws of etiquette. _ The spectators on the ground did nob mind a bit. On the- contrary, they laughed and cheered heartily.

Meanwhile, Kerr having been lxiwled, Malcolm was doing his best to emulate his captain, and succeeded in hoisting one into the street in the direction of No. 27. In attempting another, however, he sent it info the clouds, from whence it dropped into Wk-ket-ktenei Wjilliams's gloved hands. Galland was the third member of the team to score 16, and. this included a drive into the northern reaches of the ground for 5, Crawford having previously executecl a similar stroke with a similar result.

After having himself made as many as the whole Albion side—B2—Crawford failed to get on to one from F. Williams, and was nicely taken by Brinsley, running back- No chances can be urged against him, though he made several miss-hits. Hut Crawford's miss-hits are not infrequently as strong as an ordinary Dunedin batsman's full hits. It was significant, thai tho big majority of tho crowd of spectators loft the ground as soon as Crawford got out.

One hit of Crawford's, by the way. a lovely on-chive jKi-st tho Grange pavilion, yielded nothing. The umpire signalled a] bounda.ry, but. Baker drew attention to the fact that all hits past the. point named j were to be run out: so the 4 was cancelled. Had this been counted, a.nd the full value of several other strokea been taken. Crawford would just about have scored his third successive oentury Young S.atlerthwaite batted very nicely indeed for 14 at tho finish of the. innings. He played quite confidently, and made some good strokes. Itinhev, who does not usually bowl, was the most successful trundler against his fellow-colts, capturing three of them for 25. dames Marks bowled very well for a while, and got some awkward swingers in. Up to his fifteenth over only 38 runs had been scored off him, but his last six balls yielded a further 20. Johnston's slows bad »o sting in them, and K. Williams i got his iwo wickets through the batsmen losing patience with his short stnft. Nelson kept wickets for tho Colts in tine stvle. standing up to Crawford and taking'the fast mics cleanly and coolly. He missed catching Strang off Galland. but. on the whole, shaped splendidly. Frank Williams, for Albion, was also in tip-top form. . ( , St. Kilda- again triumphed over Cansbrook A; this time by 49 runs. 1 must admit that the result surprised me a little, as the younger team cannot be said to possess a strong batting side, while Carisbrook have some really good performers with the willow. Consequently I expected that Adams's eleven would this time prove equal to the task. But it is evident, that Harvey found a wicket just suited to his good length, fast medium bowling, for his figures—eight for 45 off 17 overs—are excellent. Thus he iilled very successfully the place of George Kdwards at the- crease.

ITarvev. William Kerr, and M'Carlcn each got 25 runs <lhe first named being not out), while Livingstone made 20 and Ring 10. so that it. was not a one or' twoman"' score. Carisbrook's fielding is said to have been slack, though one or two good catches, notahly that by Adams which disposed of M'Carten, were made. The only bowler who appears to have caused much trouble was Siedeherg- -four for 30.

Itaiinerma.n, who executed _ some nice strokes, easily top-scored for his side, but, with the exception of Adams (15) and Smith (13), no one else stayed long enough to show any form. The. l'cv. W. Hay, 1 regret to (earn, has been ill, and is now awav recuperating. Another rev. gentleman in Mr Mortimer played for Carisbrook on Saturday, lint was caught behind the wickets before he had scored. There was nothing much that is worthy of note in the Dinicdin-t'arisbrook R e,ame On a good, fast, wicket Carisijumk could only muster 120 runs, and it, looked "a

good thing" for Dunedin. If the honm team's batting was poor, that of the visitors was worse, for thev were, all out lor 88. Westhrook was top scorer tor the. winners with 27, made 111 his usual thorough stylo, while Nugent piayod stea-dily lor 25 not out. There were three other doubledigure, scorers, hut, none jjut very far. It was not a day for there was a " tang" in the air that stiffened up the muscles, and. despite, the good wicket, things didn't come the batsmen's wav. Cra,moud was the only one of tlio Dunedin side who played a really cricket - like innings, though M'Kay got a uselut 13. I'ufortu.lately for the Dunedin Hub, t'ra.mond is leaving this week to take up a. responsible position in Jnvcrcargill. 11 <• wdi he sadly missed from a. side that is already weak in the run-getting line. The" howlers in this match mi Saturday had rather a, harvest. The cross wind helped them considerably, and the swervo was greatly in evidence. Especially so was. this the ease? with the young Dunedin trundler Oraham. who swung in from lei' most awkwardly, while the left-hander (Jiveu came with the aim from the, other side. This pair howled really well. for Carisbrook Kamsden ami Nelson easily accounted lor the opposition, howling uneha.nged. The wind also helped 'the natural swerve of these two. Altogether the hatsmen had rather an uncomfortable time at Carisbruok. Cra.w ford's last three visits to the wickets have resulted in scor-e.s of lfS not" out, .135-not out. and 82—a total of 395 runs for once out.

As is usual when ;i performance <>t special merit; .is announced, memories oi others i:rop up and arc clifi'iissril. Atler the appearance of the paragraph lecuviing Nelson's I'ea.t of taking four wickeis with four consecutive balls, I was reminde-d that "Tommy" M'Farlane liail (lone even bettor than this in the match Albion v. Garisbrook 15 some three or four years ago, when ho took five wickeis with siircessive deliveries. Then, of course, there is Alex. Uowncs's great performance agn-insl, Auckland in 1890-94 season, when he captured four wiekeU with as many balls, :uifl in the match took eleven wickets for BJ. Again, there is the record put. up by tlarry Harraway away b;iek in the kite nineties, when, playing tor a Carisbrook eleven, lie dismissed live of the Williamson's Opcna Company team in five balls. J u those d-a.y.s the opera team wore no mean performers, either, the eleven including such wcll-l;no\vn players as Syd. Dean (New South. Wales rep.). Kurd" (Auckland rep.), Hic-e, .Xielson, .Stephenson, and others. In connection with howling feats, the latp.it Sydney ■Referee' to hand has the foliowinti :—' Senre.s an<l Biographies' (Vol. xiv.) tells of ii bowler name<l Walker taking eight wickets will success vc balls, and winding up with nine wicket* for no runs. Seven wickets in successive halls have h«e<i taken many tinn>.-». bul rarely in Australia. A notable instance was recorded at Bathius! in 1000. when J. J. Dtnvd. for St. Stanislaus' College against St. Barnabas' (,'.('.. bowled seven with successive balls, and wound up with .seven wicket.** for no runs. With the la.st ball of his firpt over he took ;i wickci. and with each ball of the second over he hit the. stumps. The hat-trick through each man being stumped is likewise very rare, but it, too, has been surpassed. In it, match between the .second elevens of the lf.Ji.st Melbourne and Melbourne dubs on February 15. 1896. i'mir o|' tin !■>.,t Melbourne batsmen were slmnixd ojj sin cei.-ive balls.

Two-schoolboy admirers of J, N. Crawford reeontly unearthed from files, books, etc, a number of records of and references to the Ota-go coach, both in regard to his English, and lib Australian career.' These they typed, signed, and presented to their hero", who was. naturally, very pleased with 'the gift, and with the interest in the game displayed by the youngsters.

The. new arrangement- entered into by the State associations of Australia, whereby the wicket in the vicinity of the stumps may bo proteced from rain during any interval, was brought into practice for tho first time during the progress of the recent New .South Wales-South Australian match, in Sydney, when the covers were pub on at the luncheon adjournment, as a light, rain was falling. " Felix " has the following words of appreciation of our coach, in the latest issue of the 'Australasian' to hand:—"The jots of J. N. Crawford to South. Australian cricket cannot be properly estimated Tn recent years he was to some extent what Georgc'Giffen used to be in the old days. Cricketers of Crawford's calibre are very .raro indeed."

Commenting on. the match Victorian Colts y. South Australian. Coils, the Adelaide correspondent of the Melbourne 'Winner' says-. "Considering that the, team of Victorian 'Colts' which defeated the South Australian 'Colts' on the Adelaide Oval by nine wickets was really only a second eleven, the, victory (should be do eidedly gratifying to Victorians. Thfie was no particularly noteworthy feature of the p.lav, but the phase of the game which impreEtod South Australians most was the careful coaching given by Jack W:>rra!l to the youngsters under his charge Not oniv wa's the coach teaching all the time, but his charge seemed, keen to icarti, and young players or this sid-:i who have to battle along in their own sweet way were onvne-.s. The_ game was a- tn'mnph for a wdl coached «ide against one which, had >.<■> rick up the points of the game- in the !*"■' ivMiner possible." —Jnnio- Jottings. - Tin tall skipper of the Morninglou team put in some hefty hitting on Satmday against Grange, when he made 88 in quick tine. The hid team had four down for 18, but the tail wagged to .some purpose.. Tho next highest- score to Shaw's were 18 by Anderson and 17 by Hope. Patterson's innings of 22 for Grange was a good one, while in the bowling department veteran George Crosbie was. best. ]!'-■ got, five rickets quickly, but his aveinge was tally damaged by Shaw.^ Vie. Holderness, ' Momingtori's chief bowler, is now in training at Centra! Battery, and is to leave phoilly for the front The club will feel his locs ptelly severely Momington are. sending a. ' team to Clrristehureh at Faster for a " friendly go" with one of the local chilis. The return "(est match " .Dunedin B v. Dunedin C was played on Saturday,, and this time the B's revenged themselves for their former defeat bv y beating the --vets" by :.- dicker «nd «5 «>»«. The C's had Ihe assistance oi their obi comrade Alec Gey. who is down from Christen ureh. on business for a. few day*. Alee showed ho could still bowl a bit. tliough lack of practice fourd him out -niter a ! while.

It was with mixed feelings that Harry Harraway, the ( 'ar.isbrook veteran, retired caught ill the match between the (' and I) teams of his club on Saturday. His chagrin at, setting out was tempered by the"fact that the fieldsman, who hioughb about- his downfall was his own 15-year-old son. Tho eate-h. too, was a. brilliant; one. taken at short leg off a hard hit. Voting- Ha.rra-way. subsequently goniig in to bat last man, kept- his "wicket up and enabled his side to score a win. Verily a chip off the old block. After '.be conclusion of the second tound (if second grade matches next Saturday there will be a. new draw, in which a.,11 the teams in A section will jtn.-ct t ho.-e in 1! section.

3, P ? rS ■~ : Colts • i. 9 9 0 0 18 Ofioho ... 9 7 1 1 15 (Jra-ngr. 9 4 4 1 9 Carisbrook 1> 9 3 5 3 9 Thnicdin 9 3 5 1 7 St. Kilda ... 9 3 5 1. 7 OariVbvook A 9 1 6 2 4 Albion S<co So 9 ml ( ction 0 ratio. A 6 3 Z'imKtinr: Brothers 9 3 1 0 13 High School 9 6 3 0 14 Carisbrook 0 q 5 4 0 12 Anderson Bar 9 3 6 0 6 St. Kilda ... 9 3 6 0 6 Carisbrook D Se. 9 lion 2 "7 0 4 Momineton 9 9 0 0 29 Opoho ~ 9 5 3 1 11 Albion 9 5 4 0 JO [rra-ngo 9 4 5 0 8 Dnneciin C 9 2 7 0 4 Duncdin B 9 1 7 1 3

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Bibliographic details

CRICKET NOTES, Issue 15705, 20 January 1915

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3,443

CRICKET NOTES Issue 15705, 20 January 1915

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