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The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1915.

Tmf, position ju Dunediii as regards the .supply of milling wheat

Tho Supply of Wheat.

is -till strained, but. it. is satisfactory to be asmireu

by flour-millers." representatives tli.it: thcie i,, no acute danyer of a bread famine. The difliculty ot obtaining even moderate supplies of wheat has been increased by the legal complications as to tbtweizure „i v.heat by the Now .South Waics Oovcrnnient— which have resulted in (he holding up of the steamer K;iia].i<n'. at. Sydney with a largo c.'.nfiignment n f wheat, purchased hv the New Zealand ( government. The delay of the Kaiapois departure has an espcciallv ccrioiw interest for the public of ljunedin and district. The Dominion Oovernment had arranged, ue ;1)v ,-rediblv informed, to allocate 20,000 bu-hels of the Kaiapoi's coi.si-umciit to Dunech'n - a quantity which would have supplied about 400 'tons of ilonr 'approximately). It.' is climated that Duncdiii wil! require 600 tons or so of Hour to serve, the needs of the public un til the incoming of tj lt . „-j, e;lfc h an -<,. n . h[ .March, when it is exported that conditions will regain eomefhino; like the normal standard. Two lots of Canadian wheat weu- allocated t> Northern mills, and Dunediu was to have H'eurt'd a tumorous share <,f the Kaiapoi',. shipnwnt. If that steamer be. detained indefinitely at Sydney the supplier.- of flour in Duncdin will feel a keen pinch to Kerve public requirement. One miller ha? managed to «*cure in the tiortheni districts of this iefand enough wheat to supply about 25 tons of Hour, but that quantity could only bo purchased at 7s a bushel. No secret is made of the fact, that the regulation?; as to the fixed price of wheat are openly unheeded by holders of'"-wheat. Buyers who are anxious to provide a little flour for their most reeessitousi customers have no choke iu the matter, and must pay a price much .higher than the Foodstuffs t.Hirnmiseion's fixed rate. The result is that .such purchasers are. compelled to increase the price of Hour to £l6 jper too. It is

stated that, notwithstanding all the talk about. , regulating prices and smothering exploitation of a. long-sufi'ering public, circumstances since the outbreak of war have forced the price of flour up from 6s 6d per 50!h in July to 8s 9d'and 9s in January. It ifi fervently hoped that the Government will be able io break the '•'red tape" that is holding up the Kaiapoi at Srdner.

The prospects of the New Zealand wheat harvest are now better than they wore a month ago, and it is ectimauxl that the yield will ho greater than previously calculated. The -n-hent- crops arc reported ' to be. thin in Northern areas, but in the South farmers anticipate a good yield. There has been a great deal of caustic comment as to the. Prime Minister's statement- that it is proposed to allow, when tho new yield came into the market, the law of supply and demand to operate. Several Hour-millers do not anticipate an inflation of prices for the new wheat. They believe, indeed, that although the farmers will doubtless demand all they can get for their yields of wheat, conditions will he> normal in March. It is admitted, however, that the administrative authorities will require to be on the alert- to frustrate anv exploitation. This can bo effected by maintaining. if circumstance.* warrant doing so. the present policy of re-moving ail restrictions as to importations, and importing wheat and flour a.nd spiling them at cost price, or even a little lower. it tii-o greed of growers 'is <olo>sal. It will he time enough to discuss that aspect of the question when tlii.- seasons yieid of wheat, is ready for the. market. 'I he important- point- at the moment is to urge the. Government t-. hammer at the Australian authorities to release the- shipment on the Kaiapoi, and thus sccuru wheat for the immediate, ami .somewhat «t rained necessities of the millers and bakers in Dunedin.

I.v another elec tioriee riti- letter m our correspondence i'u:Labor and mmi today Mr H Dunedin Central. p.reen, on behalf >" the Duncdin Political Labor Representation Committee, tetuins to the arguments ovt? the, clumsy do lea: nf the committee's candidate (who must r.ow- be crying ,: Save me from my friends ' ; in the rcmU't-t for fhincdm Centra! ami the "Star's' attitude towards political partic?. 'J'Ue ;vre, ; .meuts are reiv.ni kably smiijrr in the superiirial li.ici''- whi: hj is the -iantlard equipment of a, certain type ut lucky politician. M'hor.-> if. the same with facts and the same- streak nf strained smartness. There is a, clai">. >:>- example, that Mr Preen and his advisers lu'vc "exploded iiiir fanciful picture •'.,r Mr Slatham as a 'true sport ' m i--•'?i-j;ninS thn Duncdin Central scat." The explosion nf a fanciful picture will :;tarlio nobody. Put it is not expected that wo tdiould discriminate correctly cm questions attectiri'r ical progress ; we .-utter (it 's asserted) from "Red Feditis."' The only - Hed F«ditis" we were really concerned ahout was cured with hammet-handles a. little more, than a. year acio, and driven out. (lei. us hope) fur ever from the healthy industriaiism of New Zealand. .\s for Mr Preen'.* naked (ruth whnh explodes our fanciful picture ot the "true tq-.ort." it is futile. It us f'arlied with a. raejjcd e.i-oak - "the. election petition proceedings would " certairdv have re.-uUed in a, new election,

"and possihiy in Mr Mun.ru declared "the elect of Dunedin Central." Tt, is easy to make that assertion after the expiiy of the period in which election petitions- may he filed. Possihiy the Dunedin Political 'Labor Committee: were such -'t-rue sports'' that they refused t'i test their faith in the proper place. If thai were their commendable mnlive. they should not spoil its effect by whining abou; Mr Munm's defeat and sneerinc,' at Urn motive of their opponent. 'l'hey should take a lead from Mr Munto, ■

Mr Broen apparently doubts our support of Proportional Representation because, we ('in not support "the only party pledged to give- the "lector* this oh'-drab!" leform." If the Denodin Political Labor Ut-prosen-trdion Committee were thorough and genuinely frank 'n their studv of the • Star'sadvocacy of Proportional .Representation thev would rceoL'nise that ivo condemned the Reform Government, for failing to i'Xtend the priiK-ifdc of this electoral system to the blouse of Representatives alter establitbuig if. in the I.egislaiivo 'Council. an experiment characterised, by the Mppo. s'tion as "nyinu it first on the do;,'." Ji i« surely to the. credit, of the Reform paiiv th;il 'bey. with the aid of " veactionary Tories" and ono ov (no of thrir particular Labor friends in the. Lceisialive Council, contrived, after keen thrilling, to establish Proportional KopivftontaliuiL as the basis of election of Council! >rs in til'- future.. For many years the Opposition, notwithft.'indiiiii all thf-ir <ntiiusi.-r-m for denocratic progress, deliberately refused to ecunto'iai'.ce the system. Indeed, lhey were more, hittcrly opposed to it than the Reform paity, who at leas!, decided to '•try it mi the dog." Under the. stress of lot party power the Opposition have now (apparently) recognised the need of Proportional Representation. We shall b» pleased to commend them when they actually apply the system to the election of members of the Home, of Representatives. By that time, possibly, we shall'be entirely cured of "Red Fenitis." and able to discriminate- correctly.

TliK summoning of n Prime Ministers' Conferenee this year in the

"Audi Alteram Partem." \

roii'iine; summer has been -tiggc-ted by the London 'Times' iu

comment lug on the views of Naval Defence expressed by the Prime Minister of Australia during his tour of the Dominion, and it will have been noted that Mr Fisher endor.-es the opinion of our p'oat London contemporary. On the other hand, the. Prime .Minister of Canada ha:; expressed a contrary opinion, and tln\ journal has oh more than one occasion taken the same view, holding, on the fob lowine; grounds, that next June would be a most inopportune time for convening an Imperial Conference: It would be unsuitable, while a great war, involving the fate of the Empire, is pending, to consider any alteration of Imperial relations while the war is owning on. That British Mini-tors cannot spate the necessary time from their arduous duties in connection with the war. That it would be highly inconvenient for the Prime Ministers of the Oversea Dominions and their colleagues of Defence to be away from their respective countries : and That, therefore, the next .Imperial Conference should be postponed until the British Ciovornmerit are iu. a position to suggest a belter and more convenient time. On the principle that there are two sides to every important issue, we propose to allow a much-esteemed representative of the party who desire an early assembly of the Prime Ministers' Conference to set their views before our readers. To our contentions he makes this rejoinder: To those who assume that, during the next few months the Empire wil! lie making its greatest effort in tho war, and that such effort will be successful in terminating the war in the near future, a conference for the purpose of consider.- ,

ing eonstrnctive changes in the relations between the Dominions and the United Kingdom i« obviously open to grave oh jection. But this docs not take into account air aspect of the question which is at present of the highest importance—namely, the need for an Imperial Conference to consider how the Dominions can best direct their efforts in assisting the British Government in the conduct of the war.

The present position is that several separate fiovernments are eo-operatin., in waging a. war for their existence Must not the Admiralty, the War Offic and the Foreign Office at the present time have information which, if placed before the representatives of the X>r minions, would enable the Dominions t > make their effort; proportionate to the task before them, and to co-operate a effectively as may be in the prosecutioi of the war, and to make such pre para tions for the future as are called for? Further, is it not. most desirable that, Great Britain and the Dominions should discuss their respective views as to th* pence, settlement? The special interests of all parts of the Empire will be affected in that settlement. The British Govern ment are. by the nature of the case, well informed as to the interests of tin United Kingdom, and must certainlv desire, to be as well informed as to th interests of the Dominions. This can not be done merely by communication between each Dominion ;>n<l the Britisb Government, but is essentially a subject for a joint discussion with the represen tiit.ives of all the Dominions present, and should be dune, well in advance, of anv prospect of settlement. It has been pointed out that it is difficult for the. Prime Ministers or other Ministers lo g:i atvay from their D< minions t-o a. conference. If it: is ad niittrd that a- conference of the kin 1 suKjjested is necessary, then for them not to (jrn on account'of political dutie in (heir own Dominions is to rank thi concern; of a Dominion a- of higher im portance. than those which determine thi continued exidence of both it and the Empire as a who];;. This is not the place to examine the anomalies and the dangers of attempting to maintain cm national cxMenrv !>y (hj,. ro-op,'ration o separate Government.-. !,ut it is clear that sueli co-operation can only be eltet; tive if the Dominion Governments ar

well informed upon the naval ana military situation, ami also unou foreign affair-. _\Ve know (hat there is nu means by which they are kept adequately informed in those matters sne bv the Imperial Conference nr the Imperial Defence Committee. Tt would, indeed, appear that, except, by means of these conferences. Dominion Ministers have \ei-v little more information than i> oub-li-hod in the I're-s. Surely it i« open to the Dominion on a, matter that so vitally concern; them t.. inform the F'.ritjsh (Government of th-ur de-ire to attend a conference nt the usual date The conference would presumably lie shorn of the entertainment hitherfo' eu-tomarv, and he purely confined to the Im-mess 'in hand.

To sum up. the suggestion is not for a- conference fc. discuss, the alteration of Imperial relations, but for the Dominion '.'oveniiiients f. O obtain the information which alone will enable them most etl'ec lively to direct their efforts in the conduct of the war. and to prepare for anv possible, future development:-.

It vrrts n kindly thought which prompted -Mr F. ft. ('tmimiiur to suggest to the committee of the Patriotic and Welfare Association (,hat he should ;wt as Santa. Clans to.the dependents of our soldiers who are ii.u-.ay. or are goiuo; awny, to (he front. The suggestion, it ma.v he sn.id. v.-as cordiaily agreed to in- ii,e committee, and they and Mr Omnmiug have reaped n suffietVnt reward in (he numerous letters of acknowledgment and I hanks that have heen received. AVe have oeeu permitted to read some of these letters, and have heen stritek with the tone of siurerity which pervades them. Many lieyiu with the words: "I don't know how to thank you." hut. the expressions <,f appreciation wlu'eh follov.- .'ire usually a.mpiy siiiueieiit. From them may lie gathered 'that many weo childi-ci) were made- happy dining lie.', festive sea-soii. and llm hunlcris of many inothers relieved, at- any rate ternj-.or;i.rilv. The gift even helped to lift a little, the cloud of sadness caused hy the absence of the soldier husband, as 'witness a passage in one letter, which reads : "[ was so thankful to see we. were not forgotten. tor it v.-;;.s the first Christinas I had had dinner without my husband, and you know how one would teel." .Another expression of thanks, which may he taken as typical of the lot, read : "The money eauie. at a. very acceptable time, and -will gel a good many little extras, which, it it, had not been for Your kindness and sympathy, I should hive had to do without. Von ha.ve. elir-ered many a borne. May God bless you.'' A TSerlm banker -with an income of £IOO a day is now interned in a concentration camp at- Aleria. in Coj-sjea. where he does manual lahor, for y.-lmh he receive*.-; ojU a.

■v,fk. Hi.s companions i/i'(;nie itisny v."''ll-kr:!>\vn Austriar.? imk! < !rrmau.», fiu'li as i i'.';u"'r:i( v.ho was 1,-i.kcn a prisoner ail'-r the UcniKii: retreat fr<>:n '.he M;inr\ ami a womnn who iip;j<) of a. famous c!i-f\~sinakiiif,' lion-;e. in t.h.. ]; l|( , <;,, !n Faix.

A most despicable ,i< i v.-as committ-vl in Okinawa last, week <wrii.es i!i,Suit' correspondent'. 'J" i: •> t-.-i.i .lorf- for til-' breakfast in connection t .vit-h. a wedding were laid the evening- prior to tlm event. The, feelings of those concerned may he better imagined than described wlitm it was discovered next morning that the ball had been entered during,' the night and the tables so disarranged that- they ha-i to ho eleared and reset-. In addition to this, the. top tiej' of the wedding cake was removed, and litis art hie. which upon .such an orcasion is the cynosure of aii eyes, was. so far as appearances were concerned, quite spoiled. The correspondent adds thai the ael sn.vc.rcvl more of putty spite thrill anything rise.

So far from our articles mi ' The KfHen.y of Prayer' being lightly regarded, the Alaiiawatii 'Standard' pays us the unique compliment of transferring- to its leading column, the- article that, appeared in our issue of January 9. prefacing it with these ohse.rvu tious : "Jt is sureiv a

sign of the times (hat the secular Press should begin the discussion rditorinlly o' siteh suhpets." r J'ho lion. 11. H. Ilhocles ! PostmasterGeneral) officially visited Kimbleton (near Friklitts) apd opened the new post ofike and pulilic hall. He was etttei'tain°d at luiT'li'-on by the t'haniber of ( 'ommerro. Speaking at the opening Mr ."Rhodes said the postal was a progressive department. They had established rural delivery in country districts, and as tiny had lound motor cycles too expensive they were, going to L'ot motor <mx Telephones were being run wherever useful throughout the country where settlers showed a desire fur them. Pan-els post rates had been reduced by 25 per cent., and the maximum -weight carried increased t, O 261b. For the year ended December 31 t lit; .Sa vines Bank had made a rcord In 1907 tiie deposits ox<coded the withdrawals by £1,228.000: in 1914 the deposits exceeded the withdrawals Ivy £1.323,000. Of 'the postal staff 205 had gone to the war, and the department ollicers had donated over £3.000 to the patriotic, and relief funds. We understand that the com of hi inking hi the bee Stream to augment the City water supply its estimated at £IOO.OOO. Certain negotiations, a.re a! present in bind, :ii!fl it it. hoped to take a p. : ;t ~f the ratepayers on the question before the end of February.

Tin' temptation to steal from sjkm.s at, Christmas time leuulted in live hoy.< ,-ipwearing in the Juvenile Court this morninsi. One lad was chained with stealing toy.s from the shops of Joseph Braithwaite and Lo Keouc, and ilks other four were charged with stealing toys from Braiihwaite's. The Chief Detective said that the offences were committed at Christmas time, when the shop,; were overrun with boys. The temptation to take things proved too much for these boys. Thev all bt-.lonjjed to respectable families. "The Magistrate, admonished and discharged the boys, on the understanding that their parents chastised Mieiu and repaid the cod of the articles stolen..

■Mr Paulin's forecast : —Strong N".W*. to iS.W. winds, and heavy electrical rain showers. Since 1906 the executive of the Operative Bootmakers' Federation have had their headquarters in C'hristcjiiirch, but at a recent congress in Auckland it wne. derided to remove the executive to Auckland, where they will sit for at least three years. The executive are appointed by different unions in the Dominion Bluff is putting up a biq recruiting re ami. Over 50 volunteered fur the firs'" ontm_ei< md th hist n 1 seroiifl i n fin en ent- i-i\ -. t' e I luft I'l i s J i iiKvcr tc th pre ent ipj il ihcadi 10 ] 1 e> r" 101 o. <7 ni it A} i c-iis term i that Bluff will have 75 men at the froii betrrt tie i ji nei J hi* is m record for New Zealand, especially when lulls Tuiitoinl stien„th \ is mils 50 u hen the war eonimeni ed In* ( hief Pos'master us -r <ititi that letters for British prisoners of war intern* d ibrnd musf l it loium mi ks which in ordinary course arc not, trail: missibk 1 httii post Sm hj packets in i-\ bu cut <nK bs pind pi t \ tic pio bible th it forei,n \dmmisti Uions con cerned will not accept rcci.=tered corn spondt ni ioi pu<-onc] ot \aj mn poll r]< tt i \ ill not b imptid f legist! i tion. \t C n ti umh todiv the oi tlv dm ( i i list L)r I hid i i "M Pot d 1 ci m, i lohtu il icldi e s m tie s r , n, on "\ostmbii 28 is] thou pcimissiou v., roitinied Vflt l hj _ 1 u,mni it tin d t id in' \ s fined 2t,_ md ci IV w t \ Udlm 'm m*"* ..* m it<r hut th* 1 \i » / ilitid _\ oc i i n < \ui i\m n i mi) i id ilea mini d tonleii nn to da\ I ii« V j nit Mn s < in uldK up 'Jk n -*i*int s il it hid li in in _,ru (I • th l* the pi nihil., of t u her liei s \ is im |m it int to th* s t lie \ io.it deal hhi h< u i( m*. but niu in in d t > I « <I i u n< t i 's bi the i >it ti il iwn lut b 1 ill bodies md st If is pep pli < id i ilut \ t in in't ii" ail t-o \v tent\ u pint is in nn 1 li-o i p<> m t IMi Mi to Ti ' 'nil J Ik d I Ci* p j m if of the li in ndi ti\ mil the p i b !iti< tint h\ ii* id [Jio Pr" idi if it th i nicicui i (Mi \\ s John ohj sid , th i. t i-. i -i. it 1 tmc bft i tl fin I ' Inn md he * \pi lfoffimt\ ui la li | ok t tin D mniii in foist iv" s 1 tuit j i nd b pit>lntil in in niioi qu mtiti i u,d i in i .1 I'< 11 (hj I'ini i i ti|nu c n notified in mi tlti t 'mi i it | tin., tit h\ \ in_ t 1 th ienlt\ uu lit - mini! iftti It bin *.rv "i I p u. di < ill i_n ' dot lii _ iii ' ' i ( P t 1 il iei u ir'oub i h\ n ' tht n s t iin mi i s i i vmotl tid | I t'l i ii pi t itt n II I ill till! u l-l 1 mi in hj d i si ti j D>tt i thi in imi , flif i* 1 p hoi ) ii, t' e riot ks ut ui tin li ud v ipj dbi th< lid < i iipt ms )i il thi ii ij i i neiiK i| hip p n Mdi tli ditit s ii' Hipplicd it itn l dei smi ltioni ii nl it \is pointed < i tint i o i in i doi ' th pile u id itn uui lii tut tl itiif (i mi could ii i! 1-• mil it > ncrl tltt in iip hue i i|i t sit iKCOt tl It i int n stm, t il >tt tint bo'h ,ii in, d d lie hem, well patronised. nun \it ,oin t tit lin af sit p , ii in lin >t tn Kn_ 's ich iis | ilt ipirn idoie ed t i i i ii i ms ( (i, i j % ic d n i. i>t i i t tut 11 gr -unli 1 si 1)1 ll rl it P >r' ('l)l'lHls ll ipKl\|sl li =i ii hj d *om i mth in i en I 11ti n tahih md on ot tiiet-e s'ipuh' | it m nd t 1 t c it mi d ni/* ns >r fir si i tin liu ui ft n nd uliil In one tin m p rU < 1 It kii, j tl u i nnd ui th tik it 1 1 e t i uu ut 'it ut* * i tu Vnth ii >! > k ,i it no on< i uitjii u ii put t > ih* mi hj hj « i rpi( t n iiiliin 1 nt in -I n ilit toi i i Int hj \ ould lint in i'i i ib «in * mo i p 1 i id ' J'h 1 * nuer s bin tn if il 1 J«] md On hj i 111 nt d t aml i c\litmt outbt in li'ituuis i ),, di „ Id tini in-mior t> iitrirniff lolk. J hoiiL'h uniictu'd I i ] <nt m i li u 1 1 1 nd s nnii tb* n s i w d ii, d ii ( i itio n 'i " <n' di\ ot to! )] it Kin m li* uniti t' ii t i M r i \in | Disi i i« m 111 s'n i i ijM a tn l i ( ib k i dt 1 s i i ii 1 i t i b \ ui \1 1 i mint In j ui li I) >ni i 1 bis ii ii tin up 1 hoii i I idi dm, nd * 1111 it ut m ulim lie dJI uit h_, lied pi< iin uh Ili i | put i tmi m v, is ijl in ih nf in i •ui i md it u'd 1,0 mi < it of tit un * \ I P'd tin is ii Im 1) \ouid ii) Ji m b \tniil tin 1i n <>r ins ti i d t j i von] i P'tiods J \*ntii]j\ ii w ui on MK ! u * \pedilioli md wi lot n ird oi a,nn i H s hi itn i \ ihi i 1 hi t , hj, m t'.t ii (- 1 Ji i'l () r. »iub i tii t'l c<- n ii im u i) iis nu li r juiikl *ut id' | ii* tin b 1 i t' i .it ilm s u( , ~ id i' is In < till <:< in* an pi ui ibi I n'li di in the ui if i\ oi in t h n i j ' nt ' i uinrn si J ' ii ' f) npl ii s in ub 11 j tin noii tidi 11 ot i tu iut th >u i tl i , ( i tn inrnihri in tilt mi n "Nt /il md I \p"diUo)i l i ' i i \ a | u in. t)!i i mii this itti iin n ui i lifi n tioin In i n tli t ii i< i i ,qu i nti i i In i n 1 1 n d ii minium turn mi Im 1 /citui ( im is. f Pc <mier 10 Ihr I tin i i n i tn U 't ii i(( I mi < \.uy u ' ' li ' iimih ! ii l l( tt* i s nd nu put url th li id t i n adr'i to m rln \i lb 'lll 111 till ino ill f) K !> put 111 it lli i olluuici li it ill I) j \ J) Mm i (be Toil ( 'm| Iln t „ i tin a nut d n 1 iii i hn„* i i I ' < id* i M pii 1 l tlKili f uppll' '' Mill | lie was in the lock-up. j

Now season's pko to graphic g-oods: Excellent stock now arriving. Cameras from Ss. Send vrrnr orfer early to H. J. Gill, 11 and 13 Frederick street, Dunedin. 'Phono 1,144. -[Advt.] Wo 1 i.iv a received an artistic calendar from ; lie proprietors of Three Castles tobacco cud cigarettes. Wat son's No. 10 is a. little dearer than most, whiskies, but is worth lite rm-nry.—-[Advt.]

Speight's ale and sloufc .tic ncknowledget* bv rhe Dominion public to be the licet on the marko'.—[Advt.] A notice io diaper?, clothiers, and thofe criaie'cil in Iho boot trade appears in tbis••■■uc. Tt, relates to the annual picnic.

The article 'ls. Prayer of Auv Use' appeared on iho fourth pace of our issue, of .January f>.

Don't risk your guests t-o Pike inferior whi.-kv. <" ; ive them the; itcst-- Watson's No. 10. [Advt.l

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1915., Issue 15705, 20 January 1915

Word Count
4,432

The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1915. Issue 15705, 20 January 1915

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