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PRAYER.

to tiie ediron. Sir, —Your correspondent "Rifleman" seems to mo to write more with the wish than tho ability to disprove the efficacy of prayer. Ho has apparently rear! a littlo about natural laws and so-called scientific facts—probably from the German authors responsible for "kultur" — and has got a little mixed. I should saybis is a case of "a little learning being a dangerous thing." He says. with, regard to tlio laws of Nature : " There is no variableness, neither shadow of turning. ' I agree, but prefer to .speak of the laws of God. I also agree with him that "the tyro in science 'knows' (if ho ever thinks on tho subject) that by acting in conformity with the forces of God we can manipulate those forces 1" This brings me to say that I hold that one of the forces of God is prayer. He ("Rifleman") says: "Science baa nothing to do with the denial or affirmation of possibilities, it (science) being based on experimental demonstration and tho examination of actual things." Just so; but I would say : When science by experiment demonstrates, or appear.s to demonstrate, that anything is a fact, it designates that fact a scientific fact, and holds to it as a. fact till it fails to stand some newly-discovered test. Now, my point is that the efficacy of prayer is one of the facts of religion, and that it has stood the test since long before science was dreamt of, and still stands it to tho satisfaction of millions who use it in conformity with God's will; and I think I am safe in saying it will take all that "Rifleman" can do or say, with the assistance of all those who approach the subject in a far more able and courteous spirit than ho does, to disprove what tho experience of go many satisfies them is true.—l. am. etc.,, C.E.M.S. January 19.

to the editor. Sir,—Will you allow mo to express my appreciation of tho leaderette, in your issue of last evening in reply to a letter by ' Rifleman." I, personally, am terry for one who apparently lives in the narrow clay cutting of materialism, from the bottom of which his vision cannot have a broader outlook than the clay sides- and a small narrow strip of blue rky, and his mind must of necessity be narrowed accordingly. Prayer is undoubtedly ''tlio soul's sincere desire unuttered or expressed," and unquestionably comes within the Divine law. Tho diJiic-ulty which faces the individual (or the nation) making tho prayer lies within himself. It depends upon "his ability or inability to got ,: en rapport" with the Divino Will, which would ever rule mankind in love. _ Tho secret, then, of prayer lies in our being able to get into harmony with the Divine Spirit—the Creator of all—for the simple reason that harmony is the cradle in which love is ever found. One enjoying such harmony knows that the law of prayer never fails to aet, but not as- is too often looked for, in material results, but in the interest of and eternal welfare of tho soul. —I am, etc.. Simeon. January 19.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150119.2.49.2

Bibliographic details

PRAYER., Evening Star, Issue 15704, 19 January 1915

Word Count
525

PRAYER. Evening Star, Issue 15704, 19 January 1915

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