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THE WAR

VALOR REWARDED. BANDSMAN AND PRIVATE. Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright, LONDON. -January 11. (Received January 12, at 12.10 p.m.) Bandsman Rendle, of the. Duke of Cornwall's Infantry, ha* been awarded the Victoria Cross for tending the wounded under heavy shell and riflo fire at Wulverghom on 20th November, and rescuing some wounded who were buried in blown-up trenches. Private Ranker, a well-known Kent athlete, ha<s received the distinguished conduct medal for assisting to rescue. Prince Maurice, of Battenborg after the pnnco had been mortally wounded. KITCHENERS GRIM -JOKE. WAR BEOJNS IN MAY. PARIS, January 11. (Received January 12, at 12.10 p.m.) An English officer told a French officers' mess tlif.it Lord. Kitchener recently, when replying to a. question when the war was going "to tend, fsa.id: "I don't know; but- f know it's going to begin in May." COPPER FAMINE. GERMANY RANSACKS BELGIUM, COPENHAGEN, January 11. (Received Janua-ry 12, at 12.10 p.m.) Thousands, of motor cars are running from Belgium to Germany carrying copper fitting?, which are to be melted in the gun factories. If neceesary, Germany will break down her own electrical appliances to provide copper. HIGH COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. The High Commissioner reported under date London. Janua.iy 11 (7.20 p.m.): " Paris reports that, in the region of La Boiselle the German trenches: were seized. North-east of Seasons the Allies repulsed an attack, carrying two lines of trenches j and ensuring 'complete possession of a spur. Noi'tlkcf Perthes the Allies repulsed counter-attacks.' and captured 200 metres of trencher.. North of Reaurejour tho enemy's stubborn attempts to regain Ic<st positions were repulsed, the enemy being severely punished." AUSTRALIA'S HIGH COMMISSIONER. CAIRO, January 11. (Received January 12. at 1 p.m.) •ij,. George Reid return*, to England tomorrow. HOW GERMANY MISCALCULATED. The spirit in. which Germany went, to var—a, spirit of arrogant belief iit her invincibilitv—emerge* from a recent conversation between a French army doctor and a Prussian officer who was being treated b.' him in one. of the Parisian hospitals. The doctor had .suggested, that the systematic atrocities of tho German army were as stupid as they were brutal. "Do you not," he. ;.r-ked,""fear reprisals now that an invasion of Germany seems J"e.asible'.''' To this question the Prussian officer, Captain Von F——, answered: "When we declared war we admitted two possible refults—first, a decisive and shattering victory on tho part of Germany, and, second, an ineonclusivo war resulting in the equal i exhaustion of tho combatants on both sides. Never for a. moment did we admit the hypothesis of a, German defeat.. The. hypothesis, most, unfavorable, to our arms seems to be coming true. In that case, we shall take up the defensive, ohecking and limiting the '.evasion of German territory. When worn out you propose, peace ; the damage done in France and Belgium will, of course, go do,en in the bill, but you cannot hope to tout, us into our last t; inches, for wo she;' still have a formidable army of t-everal million men." "But do you not think." insinuated the doctor, "that the economic situation may force the Anstto-German alliance to acknowledge defeat?" To this the Prussian, captain's am swer was that Germany still had ample food for six months, and that afterwards the wholo nation would put itself on rations. The harvest had been tethered in, ami measure*, bad been taken to ensure next, year's sowings. He acknowledged, hov-ever. that, it, was possible that, if the Allies could better support the, privation resulting from the war Germany might, tn the long rim, lie. reduced by famine. ANNUAL ARMY PRIZE. The late Captain Bertram Stewart, of the West Kent. Yeomanry, and serving on | General French's Stuff, and who was j killed in action at Braisne (France) on I September 12, left an estate valued at £13,237. Though, creating no trust in the matter, his will contained this request:If the net value of the residuary estate, to which mv wife shall become entitled under this my will, shall bo £.25,000 or upwards, it is my wish that mv v.-ife shall set apart, and'invest such a "sum as '.Gil yield £IOO pes annum, that the yearly' sum of £IOO produced by such 'investment shall be awarded b'v the Army Council or other like authority lor' the time being, i" every year, as a prize for the Im.'sl article, paper, or lecture on some military subicct, the i-ludy or discussion of which will tend to increase the efficiency of the British Army as a. lighting force. Captain Stewart, it will be remembered, was arretted along with Lieutenant Trench in 1011 in Germany on a charge of espionage, and sentenced to detention in a. fortress, but was released as an act of clemency on the occasion of the marriage of the Kaiser'.-, only daughter to the Duke of RmnsAvick. Messrs J. Berwick and I). Mahoney, two members •;; the, Southern Football (."tub, who h-Tvr- joiner] the rcimorcTn'nt-s ru Trentbam, were each pro-rnwd -with a, held mirror. Mr Cuvanagh, in making tho pre senta.tion, referred to the excellent qualities of both members,, and trusted tiiev would imhoM the honor of the Dominion and then- club. Mos.-rs Berwick and Mahoney suitably replied. Mr A. J. I'oley iassistant secretary;, who had joined the previous reinforcements, received a. similar presentation. It is. worthy of note that the Southern Club are doing their share towards helping the Mother Land, several of their members having enlisted.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150112.2.28

Bibliographic details

THE WAR, Issue 15698, 12 January 1915

Word Count
896

THE WAR Issue 15698, 12 January 1915

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