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LETTERS FROM THE FRONT

'• It will ta.ke pome, doing to get a V.C. this war. The regiments that are recruited from amongst miners have the fewest casualties out here. a.s the .miners are used to digging, and make the best tivnohe.s. The "reason my fellows, are not siiil'eririjr badly is that a'miners' regiment originally made the trenches we now occupy-" An officer of the Shropshire Light Infantry. "I was one of the four mounted police who attended the. funeral of the young Prince Maurice, besides the escort of the King's Royal Rifles. I have a button from his serge, and I also took a piece of a. yew tree by the side of the grave. He was buried about 3.30 p.m., and not far away the German big guns were firing on our trenches, making such a. noise that you could not hear tho chaplain's voice. It was a soldier's funeral 'midst, the noise of battle."—Captain XV. 11. Rver, -Military Mounted Police. "Germans we took prisoners the other Saturday night ottered us auyihiiug not to 'do them in.' They firmly believed wo should. We asked 'them if ihey would rather go b.-wl; and light or go to Kngia.nd. ami they jumped for Fngland. dim who slept, hv' in.' said he Imped the Tsar would kill the Kaiser, and snore by Great Rritain." —Ted Gaines, of the Ist Northa-inp-tens. " A rath-cr pathetic thing occurred the other day. A chap of another regiment, was severe! v wounded, and crawled behind a. haystack. When f.nind he had his pipe in his mouth and a photograph in his hand. The picture was of his wife .and child. Poor chap, he died gazing at Hie photograph. One of our chaps was w.mil,led in the hand during an attack. H j n) 1 t f 1 t 1 t 1 tl > 1 1 t I ill H lilt t e e 1 1 1 I t 1 e MM i r. I 1 ) 1 L t I I tl I 1 I I I tl I 1 \ \ N I ' ' ' , 1 n I til t 1 1 (. 1 I J I N 1 lilt I hj t, o 1 It) It! II k 1 tl e hj 1 1 til, 1 1 I 1 I ee II 11 t 1 t t tt 1 1 t It J t tl | t 1 1 1 I 1 ail 1 \\ 1 n i i 1 1 I ha e „ 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I 1 I V I r 1 111 1 111 tl 1 I 1 I el t e 1 t 1 1 I e e 111 t! 1 1 il 1 1 1 1 H f 1 t I 11 t II V 1 t I 1 II c I tl 1 1 \\ I j 1 i 111 1 I 1 11 t t [ 1 I 11 1 tl I ) 1 1.1111 1 II „ 1 I tl lit 1 II lit 111 B il tl t \\ 1 1 111 1 M 1 11 1 1 t 1 \ I V\ 1 I \\ M 11 1 11 1 VI t 1 I t r b It tit 1 t "il 1 It 1 1 1 1 t! tl d 1 II 1 1 II 111 I 0 1 1 I 1 I t U 1 1 1 I I 1 11 1 1 I i 1 j i ,t l I t Ll j, I 1 t I 1 0 1 11 f 1 I 1 t 1 I II II 1 1 I ll 1 I } 1 1 \ II t tl I 1 ) i 11 1 hj I 1 t 1 11 0 \ I I I I lilt t 1 1 1 \I , 1 I) I 1 t 1 II I 1 I I d 1 1 IV I „ tl 1 111 1 1 t 1 t 1 , 111

broke my jaw and all my teeth. I have last my speech."—Sergeant C. Da vies, Ist King's Liverpool Regiment. " Late one afternoon an engineer belonging to the steamer Reims saw something resembling the neck of a bottle 15 vnrds awav. He reported it to the captain, who "took his riile, and his third shot hit it, when up went a large object with a tremendous report, doing us no damage but killing nearly 200 fish, so we lowered a boat and captured all the dead iisli. Wo were thankful for that German mine, because'wo had a voi v good fish dinner, tea, and .supper."—.lohn Willis, serving with the British Naval Forces m the Cameroon?. "Last night was the first night for a week that we slept for more than three hours and without, being .ailed out. As an actual fad we have had exactly 10 hours' sleep in live days. One night we managed to get. on (some straw in a barn. We were leaving again at 0.00 .in the moruiui'. but at'l2 o'clock the oflicer m charge "tan in and told ns to get up at mice and clear ott as quickly as pc fi sib,e, and within 15 niimiU-s the whole convoy ot 150 lorries was moving. We only juM. escaped bcirifg - caught. '1 he German oilicers taken prisoner:-' look extremely i.owncast. Some of them are decent-looking, and some villainous-looking beasts.. ■■-(.. L. Coxeter. A.S.C. An officer in a H inland regiment writes on November 7: "We have roofed, walled, mid floored our "dug-outs' ami trenche,,. with doors, shutter,, plank.", ami everythhi" that could possibly inssc a -dug-out habitable. Chickens, running about de.'•eried nuns have been chased, killed, and eaten-pate de foie gras. plum puddings, and cake ate staple food. We have borrowed tables, table cioths, wine glasses, cl v c 1 , ' , U t 1 1 ,1 t gl <-= I I { d ol l I 1 !<• ll otc t 1 111 S tl! 1 ll g II 1 Ilv I 1 b 111 p g t 1e ! of c t , \r e 0 l w , 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 U ir 1 II lee It 1 ( r 1 i tic n f 1 1 k i I' ( I I tie I I I 1 1 ior 1 i ) tl 1 t f 11 11 t 1 i let 1 ] t e t! 1 I o \ \ \ 1 t 1 I I f <■ I II f. 1 i c! it 1 VI! le 1 To 1 ie elgttei ! e 1 t 1 1 11 e - I « i t R IV\ 1" ]lhe e t r 1 t! g 1t! t I 1 11 e t ] f It i I tl i 1 a 1 f ' to ft t, jo a 1 Tl 11 i i I I f 1 , ea I 1 el 1 l 1 t get 1 ott V It I tl „ JA ct 11 1 1 t * = 1 ] p 1 I r 1 I 11 1 I J 11 1 1 tl o ! II) Itl Ij t 1 nl II l hi 1 1 1 el 1 I 1 1 t le ft I II 111 t n ft oe t! 1 1 I t t tl fct 1 1 ,t 11 I 1 t 11It11 no 1 1 It htl i If 1 hj t le , 1 1 tl 1 I 1 \ 11 I j 1 I 111 I' lit I! < 1 * L t r 111 11 j 1 t1 1 i I n 1 1 t 4 1 1 i < os I 1111 r t t 1 ! 1 I 1 1 He ] tl If i" 1 11 tl i i ) 1 ( b t 1 1a 1 11f 0 e (WI 1 t 1 1 tl f i 1t xcjll 1 ! l 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 H d Irti r I n I 1 si 1111 1 V i 1 1 1 111 e ft ill lo I 1 1 1 to e t en lo 1 => e a hj a <=t | 1 1 1 d ler I 1 1 f I It i II 1 er is 1 111 1 1 1 1 \ I II i c t " fl 1 1 1 1 „ Itt t I te I 1 1 tl Tf I 1 I t 1 tl t I I I I I II 11 t I lit It tf t m 1 t 1 \ 1 e f 11 1 11 I 1 In r, a Ml 111 lit 1 tie I I I t in a 1 1111 Mill 1 t ?() 1 > lift! II f 1 1 I I 1 1 t , 1 t 1 t I oil tlll I 1 ( It 111 I I 1 I j I t 1 fl 1 t (It O ill II IjU re II 1 1 1 (, 1 till 11 t 1 e tie 11 II ( t to 1 1 i 1 , 1 t I e II e ]t 1 e 1 tl 1 I 11 1 fl 1 t 1 1 1 1 I o 1 111 t nl , I t tl tl 1 1 He i I 1t t ;e tl Ji tl 1 i l

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150112.2.12.11

Bibliographic details

LETTERS FROM THE FRONT, Issue 15698, 12 January 1915

Word Count
1,535

LETTERS FROM THE FRONT Issue 15698, 12 January 1915

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