Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

A VISITING STATESMAN

(OUMONU I \1 IH PRIM! MIMSII 11

<y\ \nriPdss vmm ili\c.io\

llk Light Hon Ytduu Fishei (t 0111111 nw tilth Pi inn Mimstt 1) unhid ll 1 ton li t tiening Ik wis utoitkd a cnn iiceptiun at tin. I own Hall, and sib«ttptentl, wis publicly welcomed m the h„* hill lime was a splendid uttcud<m 1 md 1 hudtton addict we, pietntid t) Mi li hit in Ik hilt of the comkintd Liboi oifjXiusatioiia ot tho city Ihe pi a iLiiings it Inth githrnng were of a m st enthiibiistic chuactei V feituie of the inn ting w ts the dunoiisti ition tint wis nude whtn Sn Joseph and Lidy Y\ ti 1 cntited tin. Ixuh ot |he hill In the course of his leplv to the adilit-s ot inltfinp it 111 th 1 11101 oiganis ttions, Mi liditt Bii'U I lit 10 ait g'tit piopositi< nt, jii tin w> Id politic dh md otherwi i ihiu is 1101 e in mv opinion, of iti li gu it nnptitaiKO is those b nd union to union, man to man, and woman to iom m Mv dt lit, is to pionde tint all persons will get their due reward for tIT to I tne\ tAptnd, ami that no person will ,u mou During my 30 veils m ~1 1 ln\e fcton mun changes mostly fci the li ttei simo no doubt for tho wrno ns httk ritlniks but lnppdy thtie his betn one guaiai .stito ot piogu s, amehoi iti lg lui t tonditions ot the toiling 11a it& and piondmg tuuoi Mil condort 101 thodt wno aic past picvuhng foi themlui n New Zt dmd ha\e no rtasll to ic 0 ct tin man-\ Vet--—t ou d mduotnal and political— hit lia\e U<n I p ifestd thiuiikh % jur Pulnineuts 20 tdd years «ngo. It would seem that on the \.i il t-jcio- ii ] may bo jxinutted to f-iy fo—no hue lacrgtcl on the M*ps 0 f the t< mj hj , but if united ot„iuisel Libor demand .somo new reform of utiiitv and beneiit to themselves and the whole community, there is iro force in Parliament or nit of it tint tan piOM'nt }oui Inning it. II 0 111110 his pissed 111 nn opinion when i c iKtd <m\ of us, to itboit to ioite It 1 an in'ilkttml .stuicrglo bttneen tho e wio hue votes as> to what politi ill lirevail, auri when any of u.s wlio are democrats deride Parliaments, denounce them, or say wo would sweep them all away, we tie, in inj opnion unlit to loinpcti witnj oui 1c How liboieis intellectinlh Fi<h of wu hut 1 behtve ha» a nj;ht to une vote and no more. If that is fio, and we have a go d n ■» to pie-> nt t> <u\ intelligent demoti iti tin 11 \\i ought to win but if w& are divided in our counsels and divided 111 our action- little wondtr that oiu opponents may succeed. I am not deriding you, and I am not complaining, though I must, from my point of view, regret that you are not more united from one end of New Zealand to the other. My suggestion to you is to begin to put your house in order. Get together on a set of principles which you can agree upon ami act on, and set out on a pilgrimage—a campaign—to exylain to the people of this country what that platform and policy .is, until they understand it, and then—but not till then—will you meet with that success, or partial success, which we have met with in Australia, and which I believe, without disrespect to other parties, is the best and eafest course for a democratic community to pursue. " Now, 0110 word as to the future. The chairman made reference to tho little services that His Majesty's Australian Navy had been able to render both to the Commonwealth and to New Zealand in the' fSouth Pacific. That question was a bitted v debated one five years ago iu Australia. To-day there is hardly a citizen of note, or a representative alive in any Parliament who docs not acknowledge that w r e did the right tiling. 1 mention that fact ior this reason : that it was most unpopular five years aso. Many people thought the aim and object of tho Labor party were separation from the Mother Country and to make Australia an independent nation. Tho feeling was tense and high, but if you have, a policy that you think right pursue it irrespective of the powers that are against you. If you hnvo the determination and the men to get before tho people on the platform, it matters not if you have no mouthpiece through the Press. The people can bo reached if you have a story to tell them worth telling" On these grounds we were able to win in Australia. "Lastly. I have to ask a favor of you, and it is this: that your organised bodies in New Zealand will" send representatives to the Commonwealth of Australia to toll us what your condition* are. here, what your aims and objects are, and go into consultation with the representatives of our organisations there for ait interchange of views, because although you live, toil, and have your existence in New Zealand, the men and women in Australia are working under practically similar circumstances. We should know your conditions and your advantages, and you should know ours. The day we have a free, and comprehensive interchange 01 views on . all social, industrial, and political subjects, that day we shall put our steps on tho first rung of the bidder that will lead to abstract justice, if not equality, among all men.''

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150109.2.91

Bibliographic details

A VISITING STATESMAN, Evening Star, Issue 15696, 9 January 1915

Word Count
959

A VISITING STATESMAN Evening Star, Issue 15696, 9 January 1915

Working