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A STORY FROM THE FLEET

Stories from the fleet have I>een less numerous than those from the. army, hutabout the time of the loss of the three, cruiser? we had some glimpses that, were significant .Many will remember a. story which stands out because it was certainly beyond all human invention. Some survivor passed a. piece of wreckage, to which were a midshipman qjkl a seaman, while the former was making polite, inquiries as to how the latter had liked his ship. As a conscious effort after normality amid mortal dangers this miijiit be sublime, but. in a young man of 16 it is more likely to have been—as all will believe —quite, natural and spontaneous. He was there: the seaman was there: the amenities of the ship were a suitable topic; and the interchange- of small talk was the obvious way ot pasaing the time. That, is a specimen of what all would like lo think tin- national character. Is it too much to hope thu-t the same spirit, winch has undoubtedly been in evidence of late, niav beeome habitual henceforth?— The. ' World's Work.'

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150109.2.33

Bibliographic details

A STORY FROM THE FLEET, Evening Star, Issue 15696, 9 January 1915

Word Count
185

A STORY FROM THE FLEET Evening Star, Issue 15696, 9 January 1915

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