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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

BRITISH BATTLESHIP

SUNK IN CHANNEL BY MINE OR TORPEDO. i in ii ini FATE OF CREW FEW ONLY SAVED. in' mm ii" i AVIATOR HEWLETT'S FEAT > i 'I r IN HELIGOLAND BIGHT. 11 '" TURKS MOBILISE IN SYRIA. Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright.

BATTLESHIP FORMIDABLE

MINED OR TORPEDOED

IN ENGLISH CHANNEL

LONDON

Januatv 1

(Received January 2. at 8.50 a.m.) Official: "The battleship Formidable icas sunk in the Channel by a mine or a submarine. , " Seventy-one survivors were picked up ; the remainder are missing. " A Danish steamer was sunk by a mine in the North Sea. Her crew were saved." . , , The Prime Minister has received the following from the High Commissioner, dated London, January 1: —

FRANCO-BELGIAN FRONT.

ENEMY MORE ACTIVE,

BUT MAKE NO HEADWAY

PARIS, January 1,

(Received January 2, at 9.45 a.m.)

The battleship Formidable was sunk this morning in the Channel by a mine

or a submarine. Seventy-one survivors were picked up by a light cruieer. The others were possibly saved by other ves-

[The Formidable, launched in 1898 and ,-ompleted in 1901, was a pre-Dreadnought battleship of 15.000 tons and 15,000 h.p., developing an 18-knot speed. She mounted four 12in, twelve 6in. and sixteen om guns, besides quick-firers and machine guns, and four torpedo tubes. Her complement wa3 about 780 men.] AVIATOR HEWLETT FLEW OYER GERMAN FLEET ' IN HELIGOLAND BIGHT, BOMBED A WARSHIP, AND ESCAPED UNHURT. AMSTERDAM, January 1. (Received January 2, at 9.15 a.m.) Flight-commander Hewlett has been interviewed. He said lie ran into a thick iog, and found himself in the vicinity of ihe Schleswig coast.. He then bove down behind Cuxhaven from over German territory. \Vhen the fog cleared he found he had lost- his bearings. He flew over a great German fleet and a number of trawlers behind Heligoland. A terrific fire was opened on him. and he dropped several bombs. He believes he hit a warship, for he saw smoke rising from her later. His motor subsequently ran hot. and this forced- him to descend. He alighted near a Dutch trawler. He sank his seaplane before leaving it. (Received January 2, at 11.15 a.m.)

METZ BOMBED

BY FRENCH AVIATORS

ON CHRISTMAS F»VE

FOES FRATERNISE

BRITISH AND SAXONS,

LONDON, January 1, (Received January 2, at 10.40 a.m.)

Flight-commander Hewlett spent a week aboard -the trawler which rescued him, as she was kept at sea by a terrific *torm. Her crew shared their scanty comforts and food with him, and did everything to make him comfortable.

GERMAN PREPARATIONS

NEW ARMY IN THE SPRING,

LONDON, January 1, (Received January 2. at 8.50 a.m.)

PRISONERS IN GERMANY.

The 'Dailv Mail' solemnly warns the public against over-confidence, and publishes special correspondence to prove that the view that Germany has reached the end of her tether in respect of troops ie without foundation. Next spring, says the 'Mail,' Germany will have a. neiv armv ready—not boys and greybeards, hut men* of an ideal fighting age. The Germans still believe their victory is assured. Food is not scarce in Germany. The 'Dailv Mail' adds: "Nothing whatever can be gained by blinking the magnitude of our undertaking.'' DEFENCES IN BELGIUM. KEEPING THEM DARK. ROTTERDAM. January 1. (Received January 2. at 8.30 a.m.) The German Administration in Belgium intends closing the borders to_ all-comers. Passport* will not be recognised unless issued by the military. This a-ction is believed to he to prevent espionage. FRENCH ACTIVITY. TWO AERIAL FLEETS BUILDING. AN AMERICAN STATEMENT. LONDON, January 1. (Received January 2, at 8.30 a.m.) New York advices state that France Is building, £wo fleets of aircraft, armed with cannon, steel darts, arid bombs, which are to invade Germany in the spring. It is stated'that hundreds of biplanes, and planes, capable of a speed of 120 miles an hour, will be launched from the frontier to deliver attacks' in large divisions. A SUPER-ZEPPELIN DESTROYED bFtHE ALLIES. LONDON, January 1. \ Geneva despatch received from Friedrichshaven states that British and French airmen in a Tecent raid destroyed the latest German super-Zeppelin, while another only escaped their hombs by rising rapidly. ISEW YEAR PROSPECTS.

NEARLY 20,000 BRITISH

AMSTERDAM, .January 1, (Received January 2, at 8.50 a.m.)

THAT PUNITIVE EXPEDITION.

THE KAISER'S OUTLOOK.

ANfINYASION Of GERMANY,

LONDt>N. January 1. (Received January 2, at 8.50 a.m.)

The Kaiser, in a New Year message, *avs: " Our army has gained brilliant rtclofies. The enemy's repeated attempts io. swarrn into German territory have failed. My, shipe have covered themselves ■with £ldry"in every sea. Their, cxeWfrMfe proved that tbey know how to fight victoriouslv or to die heroically. The entire nation stand in unexampled mariiiony, piepared to sacrifice their heart's blood against outrageous iflyaflgfc. lYSji*!!Jfifc^E.

IN THE ADRIATIC.

th* enemy low, although fresh hordes are always following. Their numbers do not frighten us. Serious and heavy is the ta-sk before us, but we may look to the future with the firmest confidence. Next- to God's guidance, 1 trust the' matchless braverv of mv armv and uavv."

A communique states : The enemy unsuccessfully bombarded St. Georges, also the Belgians' bridge-head defence south of Dixmude. There was a lively cannonade between La Bassee and Clareney and between Albert and Ronae, which resulted to our advantage. We demolished some works near Oraonnelle.

Uninterrupted artillery duels proceeded during the whole of Thursday in the Perthes and Beausejour regions. The enemy made a very violent attack on nearly the whole front at Boia de la Oniric, and gained 50 metres at certain points. We repulsed six violent attempts to recapture, the trenches north-west of Flirey, between the Mense and the Moselle. We continue to progress foot by foot at Steinbach (Alsace). The enemy's artillery is very active, but our batteries subsequently obtained a clear advantage-

PARES, January 1. (Received January 2, at 10.40 a.m.) French aviators bombed the railway stations at Metz and Arnaville.

Soldiers' letters recount that the Polish ami Germans fraternised at several points on Christmas Eve. They ceased firing, left their trenches, met in the open, and exchanged souvenirs of wine, chocolates, and puddings. Two regiments established an informal armistice and spent Christmas Day without hostility. At night the- Germans from their trenches shouted to the Englishmen : " Sing to ns," They cheered when the Tommies sang ' While -Shepherds Watch.' 'Lead, Kindfv Light,' and, 'Abide With 'Me.'

The Germans concerned were mostly Saxons.

A telegram from Berlin states that the war prisoners in Germany number 8,138 officers and 577,875 men. including 492 British officers and 18,824 men. RUSSIAN SUCCESSES IN SOUTHERN POLAND AND IN TiTANSCAUCASIA. PETROGRAD, January 1. (Received January 2, at 8.5 a.m.) Official: Wo repuUcd day and night attacks south of the Bolimow-Meanevice Railway. A German column attacking near Jesereetz. close to Piiica, was scattered, suffering enormous loss. The Germans tried a" fresh line attack between Tomaszow and Opotino, but were again repulsed. The offensive in Western Galicia continues in our favor. We inflicted enormous losses on the enemy in the Balvorod region, exterminating whole companies. The enemy have begun & precipitate retreat. We captured on portion of the front, ot December 29 3.000 prisoners and 15 machine, guns. The Russians at Saryknimsh captured 20 Turkish officers and 1.500 men. Many of the enemy were killed, including 'a general. HIGH COMMISSIONER'S CABLE. The High Commissioner cabled under date London, December 31 (12.30 a.m.) : Petrograd reports that desperate fighting confioues south of Nalocostcha. on the left bank of the Vistula. _ The Germans from Bolinoff entered the village of BoteifnoS awl the Russian trenches near Gumine, but were dispersed by a brilliant comiter-attack, nearly all being killed. The Germans suffered enormous losses, including several mitrailleuses.

OFFICIALLY DECLARED "OFF,"

LONDON, January 1 (deceived January 2, at 8.30 a.m.)

According to a Rome message, General Hoetiendorff, the Austrian Chief of Staff, and Archduke Frederick have declared that n6 further operations are to be undertaken against 6*ervia.

TRIESTE EEARS BOMBARDMENT.

ROME, January 1. (Received January 2, *at 8.5 a.m.) Fearing the bombardment of Trieste, the Governor an 4 authorities b»vg abanifag Site* " ''**

AUSTRIA'S PLIGHT.

SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT.

IN TRANSCAUCASIA.

EXVER PASHA'S ARMY

SURROUNDED AND DEFEATED

HE RESIGNS COMMAND

THE DARDANELLES

BOMBARUMEXT IMMINENT

ENEMY'S LEGATIONS LEAVE

AGAINST EGYPT.

TURKISH MOBILISATION

UNDER GERMAN OFFICERS

TO MARCH IN STRING,

TURKS AND GERMANS

UNWORKABLE ALLIANCE

LONDON

January 1

IX ANGOLA,

LONDON, January 1

(Received January 2, at 8.30 a.m.)

BRITISH MISSIONARIES,

IN GERMAN EAST AFRICA

EMPIRE PROBLEMS,

DEATHS IN NEW GUINEA

NEW YEAR GREETINGS.

AMERICA AND ALIENS.

THE IMMIGRATION PROBLEM.

BELGIAN - BELIEF.

COLONIES THANKED,

(London ' Times' and Bydne? ' Sun' Serf lees.)

LONDON, January 1. A Vienna official message says it has proved ireceteary for Austria to withdraw her troops from' her entire eastern front.

PETROGRAD. January 1. (Received January 2, at 9.45 a.m.) Enver rasha, with a stfoiig avmy and ample artillnW, began a march on Sarykamish at the beginning of last week. He attempted to overpower the garrison by a rapid assault.

Before the arrival of reinforcements portion of the garrison sortied over 15 miles, and a battle began. Both sides were chest-deep in silow. The- Russians slowly retreated, dividing towards both sides .of the valley. When the Turks reached Sarykanush the Russian reinforcements arrived and attacked the Turks on throe sides. There was only a narrow outkt available for the Turks, which was through the mountains. Besides suffering heavy casualties, the Turks abandoned much new equipment. ■This was Enver's first experience as commander. He was greatly depressed and quitted the army, transferring the command to Von Sanders.

[Sarykanmh is t.n the Russian side of tft-e border >?pt«-fei( lliiF-sian atiJ '.l urWisk Anupinn. It, lies on between KaVs and in the valley <of the KarsTohai.J

ATHENS, January 1 (Received January 2, at 11.15 a.m.)

Feverish measures are being taken Against the expected _ Anglo-French bombardment of Constantinople and the Dardanelles- The German and AustTo-Hun-garian Embassies have gone to Asia- Minor.

ALEXANDRIA, January 1. (Received January 2, at 9.15 a.m.) A prominent American, missionary from Jerusalem states that there are active preparations for the invasion of Egypt in the spring. Thirty-thousand Turkish troops are assembled south of Jerusalem, and it is estimated that 3.000 German officers arc in Palestine. All the camels in the country have been commandeered.

A TURKISH MINISTER,

DEATH AT JERUSALEM,

ALBANIAN ATTEMPT

TO INVADE MONTENEGRO.

PHILADELPHIA, January 1. (Received January 2, at 8.50 a.m.)

REASSLTRLNG.

LONDON, January 1

A CONTRA-ACCOUNT.

LONDON, January 1

(London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun'Serrieas.)

Paris has been informed that the Turks on the Egyptian frontier revolted against their German commanders, killing many of them.

Lisbon reports that the Germans again invaded the Portuguese colony in West Africa. Their superior numbers compelled the Portuguese to retire to a strategic position, but the Portuguese cavalry, by a brilliant charge, dispersed the enemy.

WELLINGTON, December 31

LONDON, January 1. (Received .January 2, at 8.50 a.m.) The Bishop of Zanzibar telegraphs that there is no news since the outbreak of the war of 41 British missionaries in German East Africa.

An unofficial report says the, mif-sion aries are safe.

(London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sim' Services.)

LONDON, January 1. The Times: in a leader commenting on

the remarkable coincidence of Mr A. Fisher and Sir R. L. Borden discussing the future position of the Dominions simultaneously, says: " It is an excellent thing thus to let us'into the inner minds of the Dominion peoples. The war has shown us that in our overseas peoples of the Empire we have no longer children who depend on vn for their support, but grown men and women, ready and anxious to do their share in the common task. Many of us have been content to take what the young nations of the .Empire entrust into our hands, never giving a thought to the meanim: of such gilts. Now they are reminding us with admirable courtesy of the difference, but still firmly and clearly. We must face the problems involved in the adolescence of the Dominion peoples. We have put it off quite long enough. These problems are not insoluble,, but are not difficult beyond precedent." THE EX-KHEDIVE. CAIRO, January 1. (Received January 2, at 11.45 a.m.) The Government are appointing a sequestrator of the ex-Khedive's private property.

coster square. It's a long, long way to the Prairie, But my heart's right there.

MELBOURNE, January 2. (Received January 2, at 11.45 a.m.) Two able seamen, Ch-juries Gardiner and Herbert Williams, died at Rabaul of malaria. •

THE RECORD LIE.

MELBOURNE, January 2. [Received Jan.iary 2, at 11.458 a.m.)

New Year greetings have been exchanged between the Governor-General (Sir R. Mnnro-Ferguson) and the Australasian troops at Cairo.

WASHINGTON, January 1 (Received January 2, at 11.45 a.m.)

Congress is discussing an Immigration Bill -with a literary test designed largely to exclude undesirable immigrants. Senator Reed proposed the exclusion of all immigrants except Caucasians. Great opposition immediately developed, and this amendment was finally defeated bv an overwhelming majority. "An amendment for the exclusion of Turks and East Indians was also defeated, but Africans were excluded bv a small majority.

LONDON, January 1, (Received January 2, at 10.40 a.m.)

TM Belgian Legation states that Australia's admirable spirit of generosity is evidenced by over £300.000 already "sent for Balgian relief. The Legation also pays * tribute to New Zealand's generosity.

gome people are singularly conservative; they bars a natural antipathy to anything new. When /troubled with a cold they prefer to paddle their feet iii mustard and water—* most ineonvotiient way. By taking a few doses of Baxter's Lung Preserver you will get a. better result. Is lQd a. bottle,

LONDON, January L (Received January 2, at 12.30 p.m.)

According to the Central News Agency, refugees state that Djemal Pasha arrived at Jerusalem on Friday at the head of 5,000 miserably-equipped troops. Djemal Pasha was found dead in his room on Saturday. [Djemal Pasha was the Turkish Minister of Marine.]

ROME, January 1 (Received January 2, at 12.30 p.m.)

It is reported that a number of Albanian Catholics, well armed, invaded- Montenegro ahd attacked the Montenegrin outposts. The Albanians were annihilated.

THE BIGHT OF SEARGH. AN AMERICAN ADMISSION, ITS EXERCISE NECESSITATED BY OFFICIAL STUPIDITY.

The newspaper 'Ledger' states that the real injury to America's commerce has been inflicted by Mr M'Adoo (Secretary of the LTnited States Treasury) ordering chips' manifests mt to b<? published until 30 days after sailing. Mi- M'Adoo has thus made British interference inevitable. Therefor© it is idle for President Wilson to befog the issue by an attack on the British Government.

(London 'Times' and Sydney ' Sun' Services.)

'The Times's' Toronto correspondent says that Canada does not fear trouble between the_ United States and Britain. The sympathies of the American people are overwhelmingly with the Allies.

(London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun'Services.)

'The Times's ' naval correspondent says that American merchants and shippers should remember that if the British Navy hnd not curtailed tho activities of the German raiders the. trade of neutrals would have heen seriously hampered, and would have suffered more than is likely now. If Yon Tirpitz's threat of a submarine attack conies to anything, the Americans would suffer unless the British Navy protected them. WORTHY OF IMITATION. The following letter, which' we received this morning, speaks ior itself: Sir, —Herewith find enclos ed mv cheque for £2O, which apportion as follows • —£lo for the Belgian relief fund which you administer, £5 for ambulance work at the front, and £5 for tho relief of distress in Great Britain and Ireland. It is my intention to send you a similar amount each month. I feel that all of us who can possibly afford it should agree to give a fixed monthly subscription until this terrible war is over. Our Mother Country is sorely in need of help, and so are those brave and noble Belgians, while the ambulance work «.t the front is deserving of the highest commendation and of practical assistance.

Wishing you and your readers the compliments of the sea'son—l am, etc., John- Ci.egg. [The receipt of .Mr Cleag's cheque for £2O is acknowledged.—Ed. E.S.]

THANKS FROM BELGIAN MINISTER

The Hon. 0. J. Johnston, Consul-Gene-va! I'ot Belgium, has received the following cable from Count De Lalaing, Belgian Minister in London:—" Please convey to kind contributors the Queen's wannest thanks for valuable donations in money, clothiuu, and children's gifts.—(Signed) Lalaing."

CANADIANS' ' TIPPER ARY.' The following is the Canadian troops' version of the now famous song: It's a long trail to the Prairie, It's a long way to go; It's a long trail to the Prairie, To the sweetest girl I know. Greetings, Piccadilly! What-ho! Lei-

In a recent issue, of the. ' Hamburger Fremdenblatt' there appears an article which serves as an extreme example of the, kind of fictions dealt out to the German newspaper reader. It is introduced editorially by the proud boast that " now we are in a'position to give from an absolutely untainted source full particulars of the" unspeakable brutalities and ignorance with which the German prisoners are. treated by England, the ' nation of gentlemen.'!' The author, the "untainted source," is one Emit Secklo, a Hajnburger, who, after being removed from a ship on its way from Brazil to Holland, was sent as a prisoner to Newbury. There (he states) he was one of 1,340 prisoners in a racing stable, eight or ten of whom lay together in a loose-box on straw that had not been renewed for six weeks. Each prisoner had two thin coverletfi, but there was lio chair, no table, and the draughts were so strong that an at-, tempt was made to stop the ventilation with paper. But, says the egregious animal dealer Seckle, even this was forbidden by the officer commanding, and the paper \va3 removed. In order to keep off the rain the prisoners bound their heads in -handkerchiefs, which, "like, the red dog soap allowed, was procurable only at a huge price." There were no lights, so that everyone had to turn in at 5. As th© floor sloped so much, the, stall wasahvays full of water, through which the prisoners had to walk to do their own cooking outside. The food consisted of tea (which was full of bits of sacking), "water soup" (tea and soup both being made in the same utensil), which contained a minimum of fat and perhaps n cubic inch per person of meat, two potatoes, and a piece of dry bread. If the food did not go round complaints only brought the punishment of solitary confinement on bread and water. Two Germans were condemned at first to three days' arrest, next to arrest for 14 days, and then to nine months in a fortress. Fourteen German doctors were among the prisoners. There were no medicaments for the sick. Those who had little clothing; were provided for by their fellowprisoners, and, though Germany sent money to pay for boots and Woollen garments, vet the prisoners were mulcted in 12s 6d a pair for boots. Some suffered from " hunger typhoid," and any complainants were warned that they would bo shot. Truly the illustrious Baron Von Munchausen did not live in vain I HONORARIA AND THE- IRON CROSS. A committee is sitting r'n Berlin at this moment to arrange the "prize money" that is to be attached to the various orders presented by the Kaiser" to his soldiery. At present the owner of the Iron Cross (over 40,000 have been given in this war) is entitled to 3 marks a month if of the first class, and the same for the second class if it goes with the Military Service JViedal as well. The Military Service Cross carries a pension of 108 mark.?. The Grand Ducal (Baden) Karl-Friedrieh Order is worth to its owner as commander 342 m 66 pfennig, as " Ritter" 171,43 m j the gold medal 171.43 m also; the silver medal 25.71. In Prussia last year 68,0C0 marks were paid as pensions for yftrjinjs ~order».

MISCELLANEOUS,

GERMAN. CRUELTY. Mr A. B, Lewin, of the Benbow Battalion of tho Royal Naval Reserve, who was at the siege of Antwerp, "and is now interned at Grotiingen (Holland)> says : We would- much rather be back again in the trenches; we were all inimich better spirits fighting than We are now. Far worse than the bursting shells and the ghastly sights of the dead and wounded are the heartbreaking scenes of the poor Belgian people leaving their homes. Old men and women, much too old to walk, are wheeled along in barrows still in their beds. Some look as if they were dying. Women with babies in their arms, crying, the majority of them having lost their husbands and brothers. Children just old enough to toddle, all trudging along the roads to goodness knows where—it is all terribly heartrending. To mako it much worse, they treated us with such profound kindness that it even upset some of our Fleet Reserve men. If they had treated us with contempt it would have been much better, but they looked upon us as young gods, and in. broken English they yellod " Long live England!" and showered pieces of bread and apples upon us, brought us water, and even the kiddies fan up to us with their little hands full of nuts or pieces of sugar. For three days I had nothing to eat but what was given to me by these people, and we were quite incapable of showing them how grateful we were. 'No language is strong enough to condemn the cruelty of the Germans, and no vengeance will ever atone for their treatment of Belgium. TRIBUTE TO KING ALBERT. M. Capus, in the 'Figaro,' says: " History will confront King Albert and William 11. The last-named has trampled a proud and peaceful nation under his horses' hoofs, and still hopes to make the world tremble with his last acts of fury. With regard to the Kinj* of the, Belgians, on tho other hand, there is tio figure stands out so simple, easy, admirable, and clear in this pathetic crisis of civilisation as the incarnation of the ideals of patriotism, justice, and right. It might almost be said that destiny has taken pleasure in moulding it in peace and nobility to contrast it with the rough features and grinning mouths of the barbarians. - ' THE LAST POST. An account of j.-u impressive ceremony which took place at tho burial of 10 British soldier:', is "given in the ' Petit Parisian.' "The procession was headed by theAbbe Lemire, member for the district in the Chamber of Deputies and Mayor of Ha/.ebrouck, and a. Protestant clergyman. The Abbe Lemire delivered an address, in-which he paid a waim tribute to the British eoidiers. 'Why/ he asked, 'have they abandoned everything, «=acriiieed everything? Why do they descend upon our coasts every day like a' wave that nothing can stay? Why arc they standing by our sides armed for battle, calm, intrepid, gay, and singing? Because they are champions of right. Right has been violated. The liberty of nations had been endangered on thy Continent. Treaties which bore their tdgnatm'c bad been torn up. They rose, and paid 'No!' and there they lie 'for that cinme. You, monsieur, tho' pastor of the Protestant Church, in your mother tongue, and the Catholic priest in our old Latin of the 'Liturgy, each respecting freedom of conscience, have successively read over their bodies prayers which comfort and console. ' May your God, who is ours, hear them ; may the God of duty .til of right watch over their mortal remains,, may He, receive their gouls and give them the reward due when one. has been faithful to duty and .right—eternal repose ; for you and we believe in the immortality of the. soul and unfailing divine justice.'"

DEATH OF A GALLANT COLONEL. Among tho gallant] cements at the front the 2nd Battalion of tho Royal Warwickshires have played a. great part. They have recently ioet their commanding officer Colonel W. L. Loring, killed at their head when, but for his bravery, he should have been in Jiospilai. Since October 19 the 2nd Warwicks have been almost continuously engaged, with the enemy. On one occasion "they were only extricated from a flank attack after severe lighting. Colonel Loring was wounded in the foot by a shrapnel bullet. He refused to go to hospital, had his foot bound up in a puttee, and led his men thereafter from horseback—a conspicuous mark for sharpshooters. On October 24 they were again both- engaged, the fighting being thus described bv a general officer: " Again an attack on* the line., and at 8 a.m. nevra that the' line was broken. The Warwicks were sent up. They behaved splendidly—drove back the Germans,.cleared a woodj and saved the situation. They lost 10a men and several officers, including the colonel. Such. a. food sort! His death is a terrible loss to us." Death, came in-, fitantaneo'usly to Colonel Loring, after two chargers* had been killed under him.

FORCE OR FAITH? This war is not merely a material, .it is ateo a spiritual, conflict.—Mr "Asquitli. This is a war of Christ against the Devil. —The Poet Laureate. # * # Defeated fiends this human warfare wage, And disinherited archangels rage. Better flit- issue joined, pra-claimed the cause, Than militant, intolerable pause! Too long the earth hath wavered to and fro; For ever now into the balance- throw The Lords of Heaven against the Lords of

Hell In irremediable, fierce farewell! With but one liphtnine is tin's thunder

rife: Shall man in Force or Faith discover

Life? —Stephen Phillips, in the 'Contemporary.'

"Yesterday ("November 9} our Com-mander-in-Chief (Sir John French) sent a message to all his troops telling us how pleased he was with the splendid woik we had doner in fact, he told U6 that no army in the 'world could have done what we have done, and that in a few days wo should he fighting the enemy in his own territory, and chat while driving him back we should give him a crushing defeat."— From Private Goodman to his parents at Edgba-ston. Private Turley, of the Royal Fusiliers, tells how a German spy was cleverly unmasked. "The spy very pearly convinced j us that he was an Englishman, bom in Surrey. Bttt a young officer asked him suddenly: ' Whe'fe was the Derby run last year?" 'Derby,' of course, was the reply." Captain J. E. Drummond, who was in command of the Aboukir when she was sunk in the Not th Sea on September 22 by a German submarine, is again on active service, having been appointed to the j command of the battleship Illustrious. ] One of the mast dashing of the German submarines is said to have finished her deadly career in inglorious fashion. {She was the U9, and her commander, Lieu-tenant-captain Otlo Weddingen, was decorated for having taken part in the attack on the British -cruisers Aboukir, Creesy, and Hogu-e —he claimed to have torpedoed the three- ships by himself. Tlie same vessel aleo torpedoed and sank H-M.S. Hawke. His ship was caught like a fish and disabled by a trawler's net, a fate which is humiliating in the extreme. It was the Dutch steam trawler 87, of Ymuiden, that "hooked" the submarine, and on his return home the skipper told trie remarkable story of how, while fishing in the North Sea, about midway bet-ween Heligoland and the Yorkshire coast, iris vessel was pulled backwards. Almost immediately he saw that a submarine had become tangled in the fishing gear. He hailed the. vessel in English, but got, no reply. The. submarine began pulling again, and sent up a rocket. In the- circumstances, ths skipper thought it best to cut the fishing gear adrift and make for harbor as speedily as possible. The ' Nieuws van den Dag,'. Amsterdam, f-ays that the '(submarine U9 was Inter seen lying derelict near Haaks, the explanation being that .she had fouled a steam trawler's juste xatii Lej jjuißiller*

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150102.2.81

Bibliographic details

BRITISH BATTLESHIP, Evening Star, Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

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4,614

BRITISH BATTLESHIP Evening Star, Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

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