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SHIPPING.

HIGH WATEB.

TO-MORROW. Taiaroa, Head : 5.47 a.m.. 4.11 p.m. Port Chalmers : 4.27 a.m.. 4.51 p.m. Dun ciiin : 4.57 a.m., 5.21 p.m. MONDAV. Taiaroa Head : 4.35 a.m., 4.58 p.m. Port Chalmers : 5.15 a.m., 5.38 p.m. Hunedin : 5.45 a.m.. 6.8 p.m. THE SVX. Sets to-dav, 7.55 rum; rises to-morrow, 4.29 a.m. Sets to-morrow. 7.55 a.m.; rises Monday, 4.30 a.m. THE MOON. Rises to-dav. 3.47 p.m. : sets to-morrow, 5.23 a.m. Rises to-morrow, 9.18 p.m.; sets Monday, 6.34 a.m. —Phases During January.— January 2 Full moon 11*51 p.m. Januarv 9 Last quarter 8.43 a.m. January 16 New moon 2.12 a.m. January 23 First quarter 5.2 p.m. January 31 Full moon 4.11 p.m. WEATHER REPORTS. -The Government Meteorologist (Rev. D. C. Hates) supplied the following ■weather reports at 9 a.m. to-day : Bar. Ther. Weath. Auckland—E.N. E., 1 30.06 66 13 0 Napier—E.. 1 ... ... 50.13 60 13 0 Wanganni—E.. 1 ... 30.05 67 .('> Wellington— S.E.. 1 ... 50.07 71 .13 Westport—N.W., 1 ... 30.02 60 KC Grermouth-N.W.. 1 30.04 64 15 C •Bea'ley—E.. 1 ...' ... 30.14 56 B Christchurch-E., 1 ... 530.17 62 CD Timaru—N.. I 30.04 63 O Oamaru—N.E., 1 ... 30.15 65 O l>unedin— N.E.. 1 ... 30.01 5P> BC Qtieenstown —Calm ... 30.01 bo 151.' Nisggets—S., 1 -50.01 56 F Bluff—W., 1 30.08 77 P Balelutha—Calm ... ■— ''O C Pembroke—Calm ... 29. CO 65 V. Roxburgh—N.. 1 ... 29.75 16 HC Clvdc—Calm ' Port Chalmers—F... 1 30.03 59 HO "Sasebj— Calm ...... 28.05 10 F. C Invercargill—Calm ... 30.00 5b O Pnvsegur Point—W.. 1 30.02 58 F Wind.—L.. light: br. breeze; f b_. fresh breeze; m g. moderate gale; g. whole or heavy gale; w, gale" of exceptional severity. Weather.—B, blue sky. he the atmosphere clear or heavy ; C. clouds, passing clouds; D, drizzling rain; I-', fuggy; G. gloomy, dark weather: 11. hail: L. lightning ;*M, misty; O. oven.-a.--t. the whole sky covered with thick clouds: I', passing showers; Q. squally; R. rain, continued Tain: S, snow; T. thunder; C. ugly, threatening appearance: Z, hazy. Fo.RK<\\>T. The Government Meteorologist (Rev. P. C. Bates) supplied the following at noon to-day:—Strong easterly winds, veering to north and freshening; mild and hazy conditions, with increasing haze and vloudiness; glass has a tailing tendency; tides good; sea moderate.

ARRIVE D .—,l ams ary 2.

Flora. s.s. (6 a.m.), 1,233 tons, Baron, from Westport. Corinna, s.s. (6.10 a.m.), 1,271 tons. Cameron, from AVestpurt.

The Pohertsa sails on Friday for the West- Coast in place of thy Flora.

The Invereargill sails on Toe-day for Invereanpll. The Kowhai steamed down to l'ort Chalmers on Thursday to laud the balance of her cargo. She is now undergoing survey and overhaul.

The Flora arrived this morning from [Westport. _

Tlio Coriuna, from Westport, arrived this morning.

The Tarawcra came up from Port Chalmers on 'Thursday afternoon, and yesterday made the annual excursion to Oamaru. She returned to Dunedin la.s.t evening. The Victoria sails from Dunedin on Tuesday, January 12, fur Auckland ami ports, and connects, with the Eiverma tor Sydney. The Shaw, Savill and Albion liner Kara-

"roea, -which is a-t present en route from Liverpool to Australian port-*, will, upon completion of discharge, come across to New Zealand to load. She is timed to sail for Home again in March.

Captain Jenkins, of the Holmdale. has come ashore, and Captain O. W. Airy, chief officer of the Ennerdale. has signed on as niaster. Captain Jenkins will proceed to England shortly. Owing to ill-health. Captain Wc-tou relinquished command of the Royal Mail P. tusd 0. liner Maloja- during her la-t. vi-it to London. He has been succeeded by Captain H. Braddiaw. formerly of the liner Persic. The Warrimco. which -ailed at 4 p.m. Sir Thursday for Melbourne via i.yttekou and Wellington, took the following patenters :—.Messrs Elder. Miller, Myers. Mr.-, fseott. Misses Perpine, Bag'ey. Armour. Gru.-»t, Godfrey,. Mayers; and 21 steerage for all ports. What is chimed to be a record run to Astoria from Newcastle was made by the French barque Vendee, which arrived at the Pacific Slope on November 11. She was just 50 days on the voyage, which was quite uneventful.

Cabled advice has been received to tho effect that the Union Company'* WaiteJjiata is en route from San FraneLco to Wellington with a general cargo. She is due about January 18. and after di.-charir-ir-g- 2,463 tons, will proceed to Australia to put out the balance. Captain J. I). S. Phillips, commander of the Makura, which arrived at Auckland <-n route for Vancouver, has ju-t completed 100 voyages between Sydney and the, Canadian port, and thus La- unvred 1,520,430 miles. The captain his Canadian-Australian career in 1893 in the Warrimoo, and since that date has been continuously employed on the sane- run.

"A cablegram has been received in Svdney stating that Captain Robert da.-k>on. of Messrs- Devitt and Moore's training .-Dip jvied-nray, died at Yivlmouth ..■« Tue-.lav. December 22. Captain Jackson, who was well known and highly respected in Australasian waters, wis, comuarativcly -peaking, a young man. His wife, a Sydney lady, went Home with him on the la-t trip, and from the. advices meived by her relatives it would appear as if Captain Jackson's illness was of very brief filiation.

Latest mail advices from Sydney slate that the Pacific Commercial Cable Company's steamer "Restorer has been selected to repair the damage done at .Fanning Island a few weeks ago by tin- Herman cruisers. This vessel was" at Seattle a

short time ago, and opportunity u.:-. then taken to change her registry to the American. The officers and crew of the Restorer are all British subjects. Under the heading "A New Departure," the 'Sydney Shipping List' state.-, that in connection with the Commonwealth and Dominion liner Minioru, now en route from New York, what is quite a new departure for that line is being made. She will come direct to Melbourne, then Sydney, and subsequently visit Brisbane, ai'ter--vvards going- on to Meiv Zealand. Hitherto the vessels of the C and D. fleet nr.ohSydney the last port in Australia before going to the Dominion.

The sale of two German vessels to an English firm in anticipation of the deelaiation of war between Germany ami V.uj land was not a bona tide transaction, and such vessels subsequently captured or seized are subject to the same treatment as accorded other German ve-sstds taken by .England as prizes of war. The above is. in substance, the judgment of Sir Samuel .Evans, president of the London Prize Court, in tho of the Tommi and the liothersand, both sailing vessels, detained as prizes of war by the Colk-oto-s of Custom-, at Gravesend and Kileady. When the cases were heard by the Prize Court a claim was made by the Sugar Fodder Company, Ltd.. to tho ownership of two vessels. Thu ships belonged to a German company, the N'orddeuische, Kraftfutter Gesellsehaft. Some time in July the. ships left tho ports of Germany, and on August 1 were both on tho high seas. It was claimed that tho ships were sold &oaa fide, and that a suiiicient Uaasfer

took place from Iho original owners to the alleged new owners, the Sugar Fodder Company, while the ships were in transit. This view was not taken by the Court.

The •London Shipping Gazette' states that the Cnnard liner Campania has been sold out of the company's service, and has been acquired by British buyers. Tins transaction brings to a close a noteworthyocean career. Along with the Lucania, which was dcstroved some time back by lire in dock, the 'Campania did much to enhance the prestige of the BritLh Flag on the North Atlantic. These vessels set up new records, and did the passage m little more than live days. It has, ot course, been the fate of the Campania to be outclassed by larger and swifter ships, but the Cunard Company have good reason to look back upon the history of the Campania and the Lucania with as much satisfaction as they can regard the earlier achievement* of the I'mhria and the I'.truria. It was thought at one time that the ship might he permanently transferred either to'the Anchor bine service from the Clyde or to the Cunard service to Canada. She was, however, built for a first-class passenger trade, and for either of the trades' mentioned she would necessarily have had to undergone complete alteration before -he would be suited for a service in which the "one cabin" boat is the most popular and most, profitable. the Campania was built on the Clyde m 1893. She ha- triple-expansion engines of 3,191 n.h.p.. and her average speed is about 22 knots. The Norwegian ship Sandvigen, a former Britbh ve-.-el. under the name of Bal lachulish. rca.-hed the Semaphore anchorage. South Australia, on December 17 from An-hungel. with a full load of deals. The Sandvigen left Archangel on Augu-t 30, having been delayed there three weeks on account of an embargo having been placed hv the Russian Government on the export of timber. As. however, the vessel was three, parts loaded, the master was given per-nn--ioii to leave on undertaking that he would not enter a German or Austrian j port miles- compelled to do so. The'-e j was intense excitement at Archangel on j the outbreak of war. Rumors that some German warships were on the way lo th-> White Sea to invade the territory caused much consternation, but the leports proved unreliable. The Russian port authorities, howrvci, sank two German steamers, which had been -cued, across the river, and had another one ready to sink should the ne-ec-sitv arise, and so completely block the entrance. Thai had not been done when the Sandvigen took her departure. The voyage occupied 108 days, which is a, remarkably ipiiek passage from the far northern "Russian port. Fine, weather chai.iclcri-ed the greater part of the journey, and but for strong south-east winds wlien making up for the Australian coast _ the time would have been considerably J deciea-ed. There were few striking inci- \ dents, and only two or three vessels were seen during the long voyage.

THE FERRY SERVICE.

The Wahine. from Wellington, arrived at Lytteltou at 6.30 this morning, and connected with the first express for the

OVERSEA STEAMERS,

HOBART. December 31.—Delphi..-, from Loudon.

SHIPPING TELKGRAMS,

WELLINGTON. January 2.—4.15 a.m., Maitai. imm Karotoiiga. LVTTELTON. January 1. —6.50 a.m., Somerset, from Wellington. —7.10 a.m., Wostralia. from Dunedin.—B.lo a.m., Warrimod. from Dunedin.—B.2s a.m., Whakatanc. from Wellington. SYDNEY". December 31. —Kanna, from Greyniouth.— January 1: 11.30 a.m., Midieno. from Auckland. Ni-'.WCASTLt:. December 31.—A. B. Johnston, from Now Zealand. VI{ EMANTLE. December 31. —Mooltan, from London.

MELBOTR.XF. December 31.—Lord F.rne and Wimniera, from Dunedin.—January 1 : Melbourne, from Kaipara.

(For continuation see Late Shipping.)

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

SHIPPING., Evening Star, Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

Word Count
1,762

SHIPPING. Evening Star, Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

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