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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE RIGHT OF SEARCH.

TERMS OF THE NOTE.

MORE FRAMK THAN POLITE.

AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright.

LONDON, December 31.

President Wilson's Note is almost- more **timinatory than the summaries of it It apprehends that unless trade wi f h neutxaJs improves a feeling will be aroused contrary to that which has 'ong existed between America and Great Britain.

HOW TRADE HAS SUFFERED.

AMBASSADOR'S EXPLANATION

LONDON, January 1

Ambassador Fa go's brief covering letter accompanying the Note assures- Sir Edward Grey that President Wilson's representations are made in the most friendly spirit. The Note states that Britain's present policy exceeds the manifest necessity ot belligerents and constitutes restrictions upon American citizens' lights on the high seas which are not justified by the rules of international law, nor required under the- principle of self-preservation. It declares that belligerents ought, not to interfere with commerce between neutrals unless there is imperative necessity ti> protect national safety, and then only to the. extent of necessity. It .says textuaJly that there is an increasing belief, doubtless not. entirely unjustified, that Britain's present policy towards American trade is responsible for the depression in certain industries dependent upon European markets. The Foreign Office announces that Sir E. Grey's reply will be drafted in the same friendly spirit as President Wilson's Note. PRESIDENT WILSON SPEAKS SOFTLY AT HOME, VIRTUAL CONFESSION OF "BLUFF." WASHINGTON, December 31. Although President Wilson expects cvjme concessions or modification of the. British methods of dealing with neutrals' cargoes, he told the newspaper correspondents that the Administration did not anticipate a serious controversy. Ho recognised that Britain was engaged in a. Jil'-e-aiid-death struggle, and it would bd absurd to expect her .radically to modify her policy of trying to starve the. Germans.

.Some newspapers deprecate the exaggerated allegations that the British policyis responsible for the American industrial depression. Others declare that the British policy is not objectionable in principle, but that the right to search is often used unreasonably and inconsiderately.

CLIMBING DOWN ALREADY,

AM ERICA'S "SUGGESTION

SUPERVISION OF LOADING

AT PORT OF SHIPMENT

WASHINGTON, December 31

The State Depa.rtnie-nt officials are hopeful that a settlement will be .reached, probably oil the- basis of Britain's earlier suggestion that cargoes b,> examined before leaving the United States, and the British Embassy given proofs that there is no contraband, thus obviating the necessity for searchso at sea. This course has already been adopted in certain instances, and has worked without friction.

Great surprise is expressed at the London Press considering- the tone of the. Notebrusque, as the overtures by the United States were made in a perfectly friendly spirit.

NEW YORK, December 31

Several papers point out that- the Administration is rather giving away America's case by stating that it will now practically accept Britain's, earlier suggestion after stating that the Cnited States would insist on her rights being fully respected. Other newspapers suggest- an arrangement hy which the Washington authorities may inspect cargoes and ksiK; certificates of innocence and immunity from s«uch or seizure.

A POSSIBLE EXPLANATION

JAPANESE VIGILANT

OFF PACIFIC COAST.

Washington; December si

Charges that the Japanese fleet arc treating the Pacific coast .shipping in a similar manner regarding contraband as the British Fleet have done in tho Atlantic have been made* before the Congressional Shipping Committee. Several companies alleged that Japan is holding their vessels aiid searching them on tho high seas. .Representative Towner urged that Congress should empower the President to prohibit the exportaliuii 'of all/supplies.

THE SEARCH JUSTIFIED.

BIG COPPER SHIPMENTS

WASHINGTON, December 31

Senator Walsh, in a friendly speech, stated that Britain had detained 51 ships, carrying 19,350 tons of American copper, and had seized the cargoes as contraband.

NO GUIDE,

SOME OFFICIAL FIGURES,

NEW YORK, January 1,

United States exports decreased bv £76,000,000 for November as the result of the war. Germany's consumption of United States goods in November was £B,OOO, as compared with nearly £10,000,000 for the previous November.

SOME FRICTION INEVITABLE,

(London 'Tim«s' and Sydney "Sun'Seivijes.)

LONDON, December 31

The ' Times's ' legal correspondent, commenting on the American Note, says that no war lasts long without some friction between the belligerents and neutrals. Especially if the operations are on sea and land, the rights and duties of two parties can scarcely fail to conflict. On some points between Britain and the United States special bonds exist. Both have stringent foreign enlistment acts, both agree a.s to the duties of neutrals under the Washington treaty, and both have promised to bring these duties under the notice, of other States. Undoubtedly the right of search causes inconvenience, especially in these days, when vessels often carry general cargoes of prodigious variety stowed scientifically by expert stevedores, necessitating a long search if it is to be effective.

LONDON, December 31.

Mr Horton Smith, one of the founders of the Imperial .Maritime League, points out that the American protest was inevitable. The most important consideration is that if the Allies win the United States wins, and if they lose tho United States loses. .He adds: "We have- 3een the German plans for the subjugation of the United States."

FRENCH OPINION.

CONCESSION WOULD BE FOOLISH.

PARIS, January 1. 'Le Temps,' commenting upon the Note, says that the discovery of the Italian plot to smuggle contraband into Germany justifies the Allies in the strictest searching. It adds: "We may consider a means to regulate the exercise of our right, but we can not refrain from applying jt to a full extent."-

A NEIGHBOR'S VIEW

" MONEY " TALKING

•OTTAWA, December 31.

Tlie Canadian Press condemn the attitude of the United States regarding contraband, pointing out that President Wilson is now making the greatest error of his entire career .simply to oblige certain interests which are- able to bring pressure to bear in influential quarters.

CONFERENCE OF UNDERWRITERS.

LONDON, December 31. The London underwriters recently conferred with a view to suggesting a modus vivendi in connection with oversea commerce in order to secure the objects which Britain and the United States have at heart.

TWO IMPORTANT NEUTRALS.

INSURANCE EFFECTED

AGAINST ENTRY AS BELLIGERENTS.

LONDON, December 31

It is stated that a premium of £ls 15s per cent, has been paid at Lloyd's f->r policies providing that the company shall pav the total loss in the event of war between Britain and the United States within 12 months. For the trade insurance to insure against war between Norway and Great Britain within 12 months a" premium of £7 7s is asked. A SWEDISH PROTEST. LONDON, January 1. The ' Daily Mail' has received various messages from European statesmen. M. Hamerskwold, Swedish Premier, has telegraphed that the necessities of war are invoked by both belligerent sides to justify a series of measures contrary to the law of nations and neutrals' rights. It is desirable that such a pernicious doctrine should be universally abandoned.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150102.2.24

Bibliographic details

THE RIGHT OF SEARCH., Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

Word Count
1,133

THE RIGHT OF SEARCH. Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

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