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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE PATH TO OSTEND.

SEVERE FIGHTING ALONG THE YSER. Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright. AMSTERDAM, January 1. The newspaper ' Tyd' states . that especiallv severe fighting has taken place near Lombaertzydo since Christmas. The Allies are making everv effort to break through, and the British naval guns are participating.

.ST. GEORGES LOST

AND THEN BETAKEN

BELGIAN BRAVERY.

PARIS. December The Germans recently captured St. Georgea, which was nearly surrounded by flood*. _, . , „ Dunns the recapture a Belgian battalion was" stranded on a strip of land in a critical position. Six marines volunteered to take a 75-millimetre gun in a whoriy via a canal which is alongside the_ village. The enemy opened a vigorous lire, and wounded the steersman, "and another replaced him was also wounded. The firing continued until five men wre hors do combat. The sixth had ablest, reached the island when he was shot, tut the Belgians succeeded in landing the pun, and they fired, destroying the rouses which were sheltering the Germans, v.lio tied. Many were killed or drowned.

GERMANS AT WESTENDE

BETWEEN TWO FIRES.

LONDON, January 1. The ' Daily Chronicle's' Dunkirk correspondent says that the capture of St. Herges affords the Allies valuable fitilJorv positions. The Germans at VYtttende are now between two fires. Many German companies at St. Georges surrendered after losing all their officers. The Allies are now able to build bridges cscr the Yser eastward of Xieuport.

ZEEBRUGGE.

A SUBMARINE BASE,

AMSTERDAM, .Tanua-y 1,

The sluices at Zeebrugge have been repaired, and submarines are constantly leaving port.

(London "Times'3nd Sydney ' Sun' Services.)

LONDON, December 31. The Germans have seized an a*>rop.'ane factory in a suburb at Antwerp Mid are manufacturing Farman "biplanes, and also a shipyard to carry on submarine work, v;hi':'i "they have been forced to atiairion lit Zeebrugge. ENEMY* AIR RAID, DUNKIRK BOMBED. PARIS, December 31. Four German aeroplanes droppej IT bcrnbs on Dunkirk, and 15 civilians were killed and 22 wounded. The aeroplanes, "at intervals of 10 minutes, flew over Dunkirk and circled over the market, which was in full swing. A fifth hovered at a distance, watching for any allied machine. The. airmen's objective was to damage the military bu'ldjngs, but they failed. The bombs fell mostly in pairs, killing and wounding [pedestrians in the meets and suburbs. (Buildings and w.'r.dows were smashed in many directions, end the tramway track was blown up. The Ixn.bs flew on to the fortifications, and also near the railway station and arsenal. Two fell on a jute factory. An old woman was mutilated and killed, and a child's arm wa,s blown off. Two bombs fell close together near the Town Hall, striking down persons within 20 yards. Another slightly damaged the kitchen at the military hospital. The anti-aeroplanes* fir© did not damage the machines, while the AlJi&s' aeroplanes were, apparently busy elsewhere. G ERSIAN REINFORCEMENTS. AMSTERDAM, December 51. Forty thousand Germans arrived at Ghent between December 21 and 26. Portion of them proceeded to theYpres front via Conrtrai and Roulers, and the remainder went to tho toast at Dixmude via Bruges. YSER LOSSES.

ENEMY'S HOrELESS FIGHT.

(London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.)

LONDON", December 31

A German officer captured on the Yser declares that the men are falling in thousands. Ho is convinced that thev can never succeed, but they cannot yield because the morals of the. troops would suffer too much.

IX MUD AND COLD.

LONDON". December 51.

" Eye-witness." describing the events of December 24, says the operations were terribly difficult. " Liquid cold mud invaded' the breeches of the rifles. The holder, no longer able to fire, has- to fight with the butt end, and also with fists. Our soldiers become blocks of mud. Their unalterable good humor, however, enables them to endure with the best possible grace the rough life and the severe winter cold.

Fifty dead Germans were picked up in one of the trenches we recently retook. Tt is estimated that in an attack upon a village captured by the Germans on December 25 their loss in hilled alone was fIOO.

. An incident on December 24 led to a Flight loss of ground by us, but heavy casualties on the part of the enemy. The German* exploded a mine a trench, and several yards were blown in. Geiman M.ipers occupied the part destrr.ved. and enfiladed the- rest. Meanwhile a larger body of the enemy advanced. Our sruns" then opened with deadlv effect and" scattered the enemy, killing manv. They also bombarded part of the occupied trench, killing the occupants. IX THE DUSK. PARIS, December 31. Several squadrons of Moorish tribesmen and Algerian tirailleurs are at Nieuport. The former are experts at creeping nightly into the German trenches and gagging and making prisoners of the sentries. THE LINE IN FRANCE, PARIS, December 31. A communique 6tates that during the night the enemy blew up our trenches north of Sillery. We Tepulsed a subsequent attack, and captured the. trendies in sections, , The second line of defence in the Menilles-Hurlu3 region advanced, towards Fontaines Madame by exploding a mine and occupving a hollow. We- captured 150 metres of" trenches in the MontmaHre wood, and carried half of Steinbach. house by house, * THE CANADIANS. PARIS, December 31, Princess Patricia's Light Infantry have arrived at the front.

SUBJUGATED BELGIUM.

AMSTERDAM, December 31

The Germans have seized bows and arrows in Belgium owing to a discovery that arrows were used to shoot letters across the Dutch frontier.

CUHAVEN RAID,

HEWLETT PICKED UP.

INTERNED IN HOLLAND

CHRISTIANIA, December 31,

A Norwegian steamer picked up two British naval aviators in the North Sea. They had descended on account of engine trouble, and had heen seven hours in the water. Thev were landed at the Hook of Holland.

AMSTERDAM. January 1. A trawler picked up Flight-commander Hewlett near Heligoland, after six hours' immersion. The trawler was unable to enter port owing to storms. WELLINGTON. January 1.

The Prime Minister has received the following from the High _ Commissioner, dated London. January 1 (3.20 a.m.):

Flight-commander Hewlett was picked up by a steam trawler in the North Sea, and landed at Ymniden.

RAN THE GAUNTLET,

LONDON. December 31

The ' Standard's ' Copenhagen correspondent states that the steamer Frederik VIII. has arrived at Copenhagen from New York with five German naval officers on board. She passed the British blockade in the North Sea without being noticed.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19150102.2.23.1

Bibliographic details

THE PATH TO OSTEND., Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

Word Count
1,050

THE PATH TO OSTEND. Issue 15690, 2 January 1915

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