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BRITISH SEAPLANES

INTER Ei.BE ESTUARY. RAID ON CUXHAVEN. Press Association:—By Telegraph—Copyright. LONDON, December 27. Official i .Seven British scaplanet, attacked the German warships at Cu.\haven (at the mouth of the Kibe) on Friday. The damage done by their bomba cannot be estimated. Flight-commander Hewlett is mis=ing. A three-hours- stay, zeppelins TTkf. elktit. LIGHT CRUISERS SCATTER Til KM, LONDON", Decern Ivor 28. Tho Admiralty announce;; Hut a light ennVer and destroyer force with submarines, escorted tho seaplanes in the Cuxhaven raid. They avoided the German seaplanes and the submarines attacking from Heligoland. The puns of the light armored cruisers Tndauntcd and Aretluisa put the Zeppelins to flight. Tho force was tor throe hours oiT Cuxhaven unmolested In- anv surface vessels. BRITISH AIRMAN .MISSING. GKRMAN SEAPLANES ENGAGED, BET DO NO DAMAGE. LONDON, December 28. Official i Tho seaplane attack occurred at daylight nh Sehillig Deads, close to Cuxhaven. TBo Germans at tack; d the Arethusa and Undaunted with two Zmpelins, lour seaplane.?, ami . c -'v, ;a! sub marines from. Heligoland. Tho British force -was obliged fo await the British seaplanes. It then r.tinned and engaged tho German aircraft and sttb-r.ia'-ines, easily driving off th- Zeppelins .and avoiding the submarines b\ suit"! manoeuvring, but the German seaplanes dropped 1 tombs near the Briti.-h ships, not one of seven bombs, however, finding its mark. Out of seven airmen, the British ships picked up three with their seaplanes, and tho submarines picked up throe and sank their machines as arr.uurd. Flight commander Hewlett's machine was sighted, wrecked, eight miles from Heligoland. His fato is unknown. AH the British bombs were aimed at points of military significance. HIGH COMMISSIONERS VERSION. The Prime Minister has received the following from the High Commissioner, dated .London, December 23 (0.30 a.in.) ; Tno Admiralty announces that on Fii■day tho German warships in Scltillig Hoads, near Cuxhaven, were attacked hv seven British seaplanes. The att.-n k began at daylight. Tho seaplanes were escorted by a tight emiser and destroyer f>rce and submarines. On being sighted the ships were attack'd from Heligoland by two Zeppelins, four seaplanes, and several submarines. A novel combat ensued. By swift m.in-o-lining tho enemy's submarine;; were avoided. Two Zeppelins fled before the guns of tho Undaunted and Aietlnisa. Ihe enemy's seaplanes dropped bombs I harmlessly near the British ships. After three hours’ flight three airmen with their machines safely re-fmbarked. Three others re-embarked on the submarines and the machines were sunk. Only one airman's fata is unknown. The damage can. not bo estimated. BERLINS ACCOUNT, | NO DAMAGE DONE. AMSTERDAM, December 23. .An official message from Berlin states ; Porno hydro-aeroplanes attacked nut estuaries and attempt'd to bond.) sonic anchored ships and tho gasometer at t'uvhaven, but did not hit anything, and disappeared westward. German airships and aeroplanes bombed two British destroyers and a. convoy vesicl. An outbreak of the was uli.-eivcd on the latter, but tho mist pievented further .•ngagemonts. A wireless message from Berlin states that a British airman dropped four bombs at Langeong (one of the East. Friesian kdandsUon tho 25th in.-t. « ithout doing any damage. An official message u<>m Berlin elates that the hostile airmen vesullies.dy bombed a new Zeppelin sited m a ality not j .specified. j — i

BRITISH AIRMAN LUES OVER BRUSSELS. "ANH BOMBS EE I’PE I, IN SHED. . LONDON. TV ■ ■ r 28. Official : S.|ii.ih-,-n > .unman.!. -c Richard Davit's visited Biussels <ii tin l 2*li hj iia-t. and dropped 12 bomlv on •m ;i;r~*:i(» shod supposed to contain tho I’aivcv.i!. It, ibohoved that MX hit Iha sh• ■'!. Im! their elfect was not, di.-linuu' I ;!>!■■ owing t" the* smoke from tlm tin■ >l. A cable from the High (V.rnn*is.*>i<»n«*r Hates that, on Thursday a Britisdt airman visited Brussels for the purpose of drop ring 12 bombs on the air- hip Mad, In his first attack eight v.'-i-.- discharged. and on his return four. S..v re believed fo have b : t. Tlw eifi ;t oubl not, 1,.- di.-iin-cnished, c-witi_: to ri" Mii'-k.- fi• ■ 111 tile tbeil. PERIDOTS NORTH SEA. TRAIL OF THE RAIDERS. LONDON. December ?3. Throe steamers wore mim'd near Scarborough. There were route ca.-naltie?.

FRANCO-BELGIAN FRONTIER.

A SLOW ADVANCE. MAKING GOoTTeACH STLI\ PALIS, IWuib.-r 23. An official report Date, Hint iimuecessfui Herman heavy nrtillv'-y and infantry attack* have been nmil-.t on TaLiho. TinFrench position* have been cnn,olidated in the newly-occupied ground along the front. PERILOUS PROGRESS. ENEMY JUNE TRENCHES BEFORE VACATING THEM. | THE WHITE FLAG RUSE. PARIS, December 23. j The Warwickshire;;, making a desperate |, .*h, gained some advantage i n the renches in Flanders, only tn find that hey had been vacated and mined. The 7 lines exploded, killing and injuring I /eral. Elsewhere the Germans quitted a trench ,d hoisted a white flag. The Northampton* vivanced, and the Germans dropped on thew faces, whereupon a withering fire from their comrades in supporting trendies played hsvoc with tha Northaniptuns, hut no man who showed a v.hito flag was allowed to return. THE GESTUBERT AFFAIR* LONDON, December 28, The 4 Dally Chronicle’s ’ correspondent kt Gestubert, between Richebourg and Lavone-Givenchy, states that in the latest fighting there, from December 18 to 21, there was a temporary British set-back, but they recaptured tha lost ground. Tho British casualties were grossly exaggerated. “Eye-witness,” with tho Headquarters Staff, states that a sort of armistice was informally arranged to enable both sides to bury their dead.

BAVARIAN LOSSES. HIGH ESTIMATE. (London ‘Time*’ and Sydney ‘Sun ’ Serriow.) LONDON, December 27. A Copenhagen report estimates that the Bavarian losses arc so heavy that nearly half their army is out of action. ROUBAIX WOOL STORES. CONTEXTS SENT*TO GERMANY. PARIS, December 28. At Ronhaix the Germans found £15,000.000 worth of raw wool, which they despatched to Germany. |Pouhaix, between Lille and Co.ntrai. is tiie chief centre of the woollen industry in the north of France.] THE ATROCITIES. EVIDENCE PILES UP. HAVRE. Decemhei °B. Tlie Belgian Commission's seventh, i .port details numerous instances of Germans screening attacking columns with Belgian men. women, and children, many of whom were killed ami wounded by Belgian bullet-. though the Belgians in most cases refrained from tiring.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141229.2.11.1

Bibliographic details

BRITISH SEAPLANES, Issue 15687, 29 December 1914

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1,009

BRITISH SEAPLANES Issue 15687, 29 December 1914

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