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THE TURF

[Gossip by Old Identity.]

Reputation got to Auckland last Thursday, and at once pleased the touts. Ha will bo ridden in the Cup by L. Wilson, and probably will start first favorite. C. Prince is to rido Sinapis. Jack Delaval and Allegation are reported to be well.

They say that La Beina would like the going soft. Prince Merriwee has been swimming and is big. Mai’shal Macdonald did so badly when well backed at Woodvill© as to make people discount his chance in tho Auckland Cup. Sir Knox, on the other hand, although out of a place in the big handicap at Woodvillo, was finishing on at a great rate, and the fact that F. E. Jones ie to rido him will cause him to be backed for the big race at Eilerslie. Now that Prince Merriwee is known to be not at his best, Sir Knox’s claims have improved. Owing to Quarantine being too unsound to make tho trip to Palmerston North, the Chofcebore stable will not be represented at (hat fixture.

S. Donoghue is this year’s premier jockey in England. Between March 25 and October 31 Donoghue had ridden 121 winners, and the next nearest to him was J. Clark with 61. The winner of first place had 612 ’mounts during the period stated, while no other jockev had more than 403. The ex-New Zealand steeplechase rider J. M'Oregor, who was severely hurt last June, has so far progressed that he was able to visit tho Caulfield tracks recently without his crutches, but aided by a stick.

Among the notable sportsmen who have lost their lives during the present-war is Captain Arthur Craven Charrington. In India he made a great reputation as a race rider, and during one meeting at Simla rode a winner for each of his “ superior officers,” his record for that meeting being 13 wins for 15 mounts.

Cisco, the 1911 A.J.C. Derby winner, is doing fast work at Randwick. Kirn (Wallace —Harvest Home) won so well at Canning Park (W.A.) on the 12th as to cause good judges to fancy him for the Perth Chip. Challenge Crosse, who won tho Villiers .Handicap at Randwick on Saturday,' is bred from imported parents. His sire Challenger is by Isinglass—-Meddlesome, while his dam La Crosse is by Ladas— Lucy Cross by S. Simon. When Eanjew won at Ascot (Q.) on the 6tlx inst. he was credited with running six furlongs in 1.13|, but owing to a suspicion as to the course being a trifle short, objection was railed to the time, being permitted to stand. Since then, however, a qualified surveyor has certified to the Ascot course being correct, and in' consequence the Q.T.C. nave decided to officially recognise the record mentioned. The world 8 record for six furlongs was made at Epsom, England, in 1901, where Master Willie ran the distance in, 1.7£, and The Tetrarch n 1.7| last year, the course, it may be stated, being partly downhill. Stanley Wootton, who has been given a commission in the service battalion of tho Royal Fusiliers, is tho second son of Mr R. Wootton, the successful owner-trainer, who is understood to be on his way to Australia.

Lord Loris, who was probably the best steeplechaser in France, is reported to have bean killed at ihe front . He was owned by M. James Htnnessy, w f ho was in Sydney some years ago, and took Eeanba and Hollette to his stud in France.

A Sydney turf writer facetiously _ remarks: Mr Carmichael on Monday died the horse trainers of Randwick as model employers, since they insist upon their jockeys attending evening continuation schools. In these days, when the tot© forms a more stable topic of conversation than the weather, there may be more in this than meets the eye. It is interesting to speculate upon the vacational training of the jockey. Physical culture enters into it very largely,' ior, unlike every other occupation, except the famous Gorman Guards, physique counts to a great extent. The greatest physical culture among jockeys is generally supposed to be devoted to developing the pulling capacity of the arms. His mathematical training is restricted to calculate what a bookmaker will make if there are three favorites at 6 to 4 on, and a skinner in the bag which romps in by several lengths. Melbourne files report that a- representative of the Victorian State Insurance Department under the Workmen’s Compensation Act was present at Aependale Park to insure riders. Nearly all the jockeys who took part in the meeting were insured by their employers. The premium is 2s each jockey in" a flat raco and 6s in a hurdle race or steeplechase, ifce amount insured being on the basis of the earnings for the previous three yea is in case of death, and half earnings while laid up in tho case o! accident. A number of stables have insured for a year the apprentices and stable boys employed.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141224.2.49

Bibliographic details

THE TURF, Evening Star, Issue 15684, 24 December 1914

Word Count
825

THE TURF Evening Star, Issue 15684, 24 December 1914

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