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Pirating the complexity of the battles in Belgium. Sir Douglas Haig's latest move from Passchendaele on Moorolecie to open the road to Routers is treated in the article accompanying the man, and constitutes a typical engagement In the " Battle of Step by Step." The Heyst Canal, extending 10 miles Inland from Zeebrugge to Bruges, is also shown. It is In the back roaches of this canal that Cermany is floating submarines for ultimate attack on England. The length of the canal from Zeebrugge to Bruges makes effective bombard ment by British ships very difficult.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141219.2.63.1

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Pirating the complexity of the battles in Belgium. Sir Douglas Haig's latest move from Passchendaele on Moorolecie to open the road to Routers is treated in the article accompanying the man, and constitutes a typical engagement In the " Battle of Step by Step." The Heyst Canal, extending 10 miles Inland from Zeebrugge to Bruges, is also shown. It is In the back roaches of this canal that Cermany is floating submarines for ultimate attack on England. The length of the canal from Zeebrugge to Bruges makes effective bombard ment by British ships very difficult., Evening Star, Issue 15680, 19 December 1914

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Pirating the complexity of the battles in Belgium. Sir Douglas Haig's latest move from Passchendaele on Moorolecie to open the road to Routers is treated in the article accompanying the man, and constitutes a typical engagement In the " Battle of Step by Step." The Heyst Canal, extending 10 miles Inland from Zeebrugge to Bruges, is also shown. It is In the back roaches of this canal that Cermany is floating submarines for ultimate attack on England. The length of the canal from Zeebrugge to Bruges makes effective bombard ment by British ships very difficult. Evening Star, Issue 15680, 19 December 1914

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