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CALLANT SERVIA.

INVADERS REPULSED

AUSTRIAN* IN FULL FLIGHT.

NISH, December 9. (Received December 10, at 10 a.m.)

A communique states: Tho fierce Servian offensive- continues successfully along the entire front. Tho enemy are retreating everywhere, abandoning guns and material, and many have been taken prisoner.

THE POLICY OF BULGARIA,

WILL UK.MA IN NEUTRAL.

SOFIA, December 9. (Received December 10, at 9.15 a.m.)

Though it is generally considered that Bulgaria's interests Jie on the side of the Entente. Bulgaria is not disposed at present to begin hostilities. The agricultural population especially are opposed to a winter campaign. The Government propose to maintain their friendly neutrality as long as possible, and atjree not to attack Greece or Rumania, or to act independently of the Entente. .M. Radoslavoff Uhe Premier), interviewed, stated that Bulgaria desires to remain neutral, but will occupy Macedonia if Austria advances thither. M. GueshofT declares that public opinion is averse to the occupation of Macedonia without the Entente's consent.

IN EGYPT

THE AUSTRALASIAN TROOPS.

RUMORED ENGAGEMENT DENIED

MELBOURNE, December 10.

(Received December 10, at 9.45 a.m.)

Senator Fear re, Minietei of Defence, emphatically denies- the rumor that the Australasians in Egypt have been engaged with the enemy.

THE GOLD COAST.

A GENEROUS OFFER

LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10. at 9.5 a.m.)

The Gold Coast bears the cost of the annexation of Togoland, which is estimated at £60.000. The Gold Coast has also offered £BO,OOO towards the Britith war expenses

THE REBEL BEYERS

DROWNED IX VAAL RIVER.

PRETORIA, December 9

(Rowived December 10, at 9.15 a.m.)

Official: Commandant Du Toit engaged Reyens's commando on the Snndspmit, 15 miles south of Bothaville. Beyers split hi.s commando. He himself and 30 men fted to the Vaa! River, near ito junction with tho Sandspruit. There vera sharp engagements on the bank of the Vail River, finishing in Bevcis and his few followers trying to swim their horses across. When his hor.'e was ."-hot Beyers feli off into tho river, but giasped tho tail of a lmrse, which swam towards t!i9 / Loyalists. Ha was next seen drifting downstream, calling out at a distance. Ho was not s-een again. Search is being niado for his bod v. It is believed that he was wounded earlier in the fight.

Practically all his followers were taken prisoner, and other drives resulted in nearly 200 rebels being captured.

<. OUR JAPANESE ALLY.

RESPONSIBILITIES RECOGNISED.

GOOD RELATIONS WITH CHINA.

TOKIO, December 9, (Received December 10, at 9.30 a.m.)

Baron Kato, addressing the Japanese Diet, regretted that there were no prospects of peace, but relations between the Allied Powers had been cemented more closely than ever. Adverting to the capture of Kiao-chau, he said that the various questions that had arisen with China had divulged a satisfactory note and conciliatory spirit on the part of the Chinese. The maintenance of order was not only of the greatest importance to China, but was fraught with grave consequences to Japan also. He hoped nothing would arise to disturb the tranquillity there. Japan had undertaken the administration of tho railways from Kiao-chau to Tsinan, also tUe military occupation of the

principal islands in the Marshall, Caroline, Marianne, and Pelew groups In the Pacific. A CHRISTMAS TRUCE. POPE'S BEATIFIC VISION. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 9.30 a.m.) Rome reports that the Pope is urging the cessation of hostilities during Christmas. It is not believed, however, that his efforts will be successful. OUR HEROES* WIVES. OFFICIOUS "OFFICL^LDOM AND SIvXSIBLE POLICE. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 9.45 a.m.) There are many protests against the War Office regulation requiring the police to keep registers of soldiers' and sailors' wives, with the right to enter their houses and ascertain that the separation allowance is not being abused. The London police have greatly modified the operation of the regulation, avoiding anything like a home inquisition. Wives who have been accused of drunkenness are subjected to persuasion instead of prosecution. There is still a demand that the women should be allowed to spend the allowance as they please, subject to the ordinary law. ARMY CONTRACTS. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 9.45 a.m.) The Press Bureau denies, that the appointment of Lord Eshor's Committee was partly for the purpose of investigating War Offico contracts. -AUSTRALIANS' GIFT. FIELD AMBULANCES APPORTIONED. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 9.45 a.m.) Ifc has been arranged that the 18 Australian motor ambulances shall bo used near the front—six to work on the line from Nieuport to Calais, six from Arras I to Holders, and six from Aniieiw.

HIGH TREASON

DEATH SENTENCE ON AHLERS.

LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 10 a.m.)

Hcrr Ahlers, late German Consul at Sunderland, has been sentenced to death for treason.

[Herr Ahlers was apprehended under a very ancient statute dealing with the offenco of high treason.]

BACK TO PARIS

FRENCH GOVERNMENT RETURN.

PARI;?, December 9. (Reooived December 10, at 9.15 a.m.) The seat of Government has been transferred back to Paris from Bordeaux.

BELGIANS' AWFUL MISERY

THE WORK OF THE KAISER

LONDON", December 9.

(Received December 10, at 9.15 a.m.)

Sir Gilbert Parker, on behalf of the American Relief Commission, visited Holland, which has done all that is possible for Belgian municipalities. The only food next week or for a fortnight is barley, one-third of a soldier's ration going to each inhabitant daily. Sir Gilbert describes the necessarily cheerless, ill-ven-tilated quarters as sheds, having straw and a few blankets. Men, women, and children are huddled in promiscuous misery. The worst conditions were at Rotterdam, whore tho people were fcheltered in iron lighters, without fire, and in homes unfit for cattle. He gives a heartrending picture of the refugee camps at various Dutch centres. The normal requirements are 300,000 tons of food a month. Tho American Commission are appealing for 80,000 tons, or less than one-half a soldier's rations for each Belgian.

WATERLOO RELICS

PARIS, December 9,

(Received December 10, at 9.15 a.m.)

Tlie • Petit Parisien ' says that the Germans have rniiovod the Waterloo collection from Mont. Paint Jean, as well a.s other Waterloo relics.

IN TRIPOLI.

GERMANY ANTAGONISES ITALY.

(London 'Time*' and Sydney 'Sun'SerrioM.)

LONDON, Docemher. 9. A .'prions situation is developing tin Tripoli in consequence of German plots.

BALTIC SEA CONTROL

A KNOCK TO NORWAY,

'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Serrioes.)

LONDON, December 9.

Germany has seized two destroyers which were in course of construction for Norway at one of the German shipbuilding vards on the Baltic.

CANADA IN EARNEST

SIR K. BORDEN'S PROPHECY.

OTTAWA, December 9. (Received December 10. at 8.45 a.m.)

The Prime Minister (Sir Robert Borden), sneaking at the Canadian Club, at Montreal, controverted General Bernhanli's statement that the British self-governing Dominions might be ignored, and said : " Before the war closes Germany will be confronted by a quarter of a million soldiers from the self-governing Dominions."

PRESIDENT WILSON

ON AMERICAN DEFENCE

TRADE TIED UP,

ROUTES MUST BE REOPENED

WASHINGTON. December 9.

(Received December 10. at 8.45 a.m.)

President Wilson, in opening Congress, declared that a powerful navy was America's proper defence. Ho advocated the development of a national guard, and said it was ricrlit that American policy should provide some system whereby every citizen volunteer would bo familiarised with modern arms.

The President reiterated his plea for the parage of a Bill enabling the Government to buy the interned ships. American trade, routes must be reopened by many chips, with regular *ailin?s_at moderate freichte, before merchandise could flow freely and profitably. i

AMERICAN INVENTOR

TREMENDOUS CLAIMS

FOR NEW STEEL PROCESS.

NEW YORK, December 9. (Received December 10, at 8.45 a.m.)

Professor Michelsen, of Chicago, ha 6 announced a new process to triple the- present strength of steel. He claims that it will enable fortifications to resist the heaviest guns, while skyscrapers could be erected to hitherto unattainable heights, and larger suspension bridges could be laid. DYE MANUFACTURE. A GERMAN~MONOPOLY. SHORTAGE AFFECTS TEXTILE TRADE. BRITISH GOVERNMENTS PROPOSAL. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 8.45 a.m.) Lord Monltoh. at a meeting of Lancashire and Yorkshire business men, explained the national dye works scheme. The Government propose that various djr»-

works raise £3,000,000 of share capital, the Government guaranteeing a debenture issue of £1.500,000. Lord Monlton said that £2.000,000 worth of dyes were consumed in Great Britain annually. Dyes were essential for different industrial products valued at £200,000,000. on which 1$ million men were dependent. Only one-tenth of th« dyes used were now produced in Britain, and stocks were rapidly diminishing. Germany was putting intense pressure to prevent Sweden giving Britain help. The meeting unanimously approved tht proposal. OPPRESSING THE POORTRADING SHARK BAULKED. (London 'Timet' and Sydney 'Sun' Serrieet.) LONDON, December 9. A woman 75 years of age appeared a* the Westminster Police Court and complained that she had lost her sewing machine, on which she had pnid £lO m instalments over a period of seven years, * Her eyes were failing, and she was unabla to pay the balance of 9s t>wing on it. ; She had two sons enlisted in the Army. The Magistrate said the machine had been unwarrantably seized, and ordered it to be returned. LADY SHERBROOK'S DEATH. THE SHOCK OF BEREAVEMENT. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun* Berriwi) LONDON, December 9. Lady Sherbrook, widow of Robert Low, died oarly in November. On receiving news that her nephew had been killed qt the front she was seized with paralysis, and never rallied. [Robert Low, an Australian barrister, went Home, entered th»» HoiT6o of Commons, and afterwards became liord Sherbrook. He died in 1891-1 FOOTBALL AND RECRUITING. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun* Service*.) LONDON, December 9. 'The Times' suggests that the professional football competitions, which have a, unique influence upon recruiting, be re- ' placed by matches between the different units of the new army. BELGIAN CARNIVAL. Port Chalmers was early astir this momill" preparing for the carnival in the afternoon and evening. Buildirurs were decorated and lir-cs of Hags fluttered gaily across tho main Btreet. The flags on tho rotunda indicating the relative positions oi the candidates for Queen of the Carnival changed constantly during the forenoon, and the question of greatest moment was as to which of the four young lad'es would in the final count come out as queen. The procession through the streets was well arranged, and at midday everything was ready for the afternoon. The weather was fine, and the Recreation Ground at Mussel Bay was a gay eceno as the carnival proceeded.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141210.2.52.4

Bibliographic details

CALLANT SERVIA., Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

Word Count
1,735

CALLANT SERVIA. Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

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