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PROGRESS IN FRANCE.

■THE ADVANCE CONTINUED

PARIS, December 9.

(Received December 10, at 9.15 a.m.)

A communique states: There have been artillery duels from the sea to the Lys, also on the Aisne, where we had the advantage. Wo made appreciable gains in the Argonne, carrying several trenches and progressing along the entire front, except at one point, where the enemy mined and blew up a trench. Our artillery has completely mastered the stierny's on the heights of the Meuse, where we progressed along the whole line, capturing several trenches.

ROUTINE FIGHTING

REGULAR HOURS AND RULES

IN FRENCH AND GERMAN TRENCHES.

(London 'Times' and Sydney ' Sun ' Servicer.)

LONDON, December 9. A Press correspondent at General Joffro's invitation recently visited the French lines. He states that 6ome parts of the line had become as monotonous a.s a city office.

Fighting commences daily at 5.30 a.m., and the men quit their trenches at 4.30 p.m. and wa¥c openely along the line to dinner. At 11 a.m. tho troops on both sides openly distribute soup to tho opposing troops. Near Rheims the antagonists have become so familiar that they call one another by their Christian names.

THE DUG-OUTS.

A NEW ZEALANDER'S DESCRIPTION

LONDON, December 9.

A New Zealander at the front, in a letter, says that his company of cavalry has been converted into mobile infantry, armed with riflo and bayonet and pick and shovel. They have become very efficient in digging themselves dug-outs, roofed with branches covered with earth, and the floor lined with straw. They lie close together, acting as warming pans in keeping one another from freezing at night, gome of the bombs from the German iriortare make holes 15ft deep and 20ft across, but luckily none had so far struck their trenches. THE CALAIS OBJECTIVE. (London 'Times* and Sydney ' Sun' Services.) LONDON, December 9. Private messages from Berlin declare that the Germans ar© preparing for a violent attempt to break the Allies' west vwing.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141210.2.52.2

Bibliographic details

PROGRESS IN FRANCE., Evening Star, Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

Word Count
325

PROGRESS IN FRANCE. Evening Star, Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

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