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A GREAT NAVAL VICTORY

IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC.

SGHARNHORST, GNEISENAU, AND LEIPZIG SUNK.

TWO COLLIERS ALSO CAPTURED.

BRITISH CHASING THE DRESDEN AND NURNBERG.

OUR LOSS THREE MEN ONLY,

WELLINGTON, December 10.

The text of the cable received byyHis Kxcellency the Governor from tho Colonial Secretary (Mr llarcourt) is as follows :

Admiral Sturdce captured two colliers. The casualties are few. Some of the survivors of the Gneisonau and Leipzig wero saved. AMERICA HEARS THE NEWS. WASHINGTON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 11.50 a.m.) The British Embassy is officially informed that the British fleet sank the Gneisenau, Scharnhorst, and Leipzig off the Falkland Islands. IX THE BLACK SEA. BRESLAU RUNS FROM RUSSIANS. PETROGRAD, December 9. ißeceived December 10, at 9.15 a.m.) Official: The German cruiser Breslau appeared off Sebastopol. Our cruisers and an aeroplane attacked her, and the Breslau disappeared. EMDEN AFTERMATH. CAPTAIN GLOSSOP'S REPORT. ENEMY'S CASUALTIES. MELBOURNE, December 10. (Received December 10, at 10 a.m.) Captain Glossop, of H.M.A.S. Sydney, in his official report, estimates the Emden's losses at approximately seven officers and 108 men killed, and three officers and 53 men wounded, of whom one officer and three men subsequently died. He took the survivors, numbering 211, aboard the Sydney, under a strict promise from the Enideii's captain that all would be amenable to ship's discipline en route to Colombo. The Emden's landing party of three officers and 40 men, who escaped from Cocos Island in the schooner Aycsha, had four maxims and two belts of ammunition for each gun. THE COMMANDEERED SCHOONER, SUUPLIES OBTAINED - WITH STOLEN MONEY. LONDON, December 9. 1 Received December 10, at 9.15 a.m.) The Ayesha despatched a cable to Padang (Sumatra) on November 28 that she had obtained supplies for her crew. Refore leaving Cocos Island the party robbed I the cable staff of their personal effects and valuables, worth £162. [The Ayesha belonged to Mr Ross, the i uncrowned king of Cocos Island.]

The Admiralty announces that on the morning of December 8 the German cruisers Scharnhorst, Gneisenan, Nurnberg, Dresden, and Leipzig were, sighted near the Falkland Islands by the British squadron under Vicc-Ad-iniral Stnrdee.

An action followed, and the Scharnhorst, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral' Von Speo, the Gneisenan, and the Leipzig were all sunk. '* The Dresden and the Nurnberg are being pursued. Two colliers were captured. Our casualties arc very slight. Some survivors were rescued ' from the Gneisenan and Leipzig. ONLY THREE MEN LOST. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10, at 11.40 a.m.) Special and official: The British squadron engaged and sank the Scharnhorst, Gneisenan, and Leipzig oft' the Falkland Islands. There were three British casualties. [The Falklands are an island group in the South Atlantic Ocean, and belong to Great Britain. They are situated 250 miles N.E. ot Tierra del Fuego. The Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were lister ships ot" 11,420 tons displacement, 26,000 h.p., 22.5 knots speed, and each carried 8 B.2in, 6 5.9 in, 20 3.4 in, and 18 smaller q.f. The Leipzig was a protected cruiser of 3,200 tons, 10,000 h.p., 23 knots speed, and carried 10 4.lin guns, and 16 of smaller quality.] ANOTHER REPORT. FOUGHT ATTrAST 7 A.M. OX SATURDAY. LONDON, December 9. (Received December 10," at noon.) Official: Vice-Admiral Stnrdee's squadron, off the Falkland Islands at 7.30 on the morning of the sth, engaged and sank Von Speo's llagship the Scharnhorst, with the Gneisenau and the Leipzig, and pursued the Dresden and Nurnberg.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141210.2.46

Bibliographic details

A GREAT NAVAL VICTORY, Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

Word Count
568

A GREAT NAVAL VICTORY Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

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