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THE DAY OF DECISION.

THE DUNEDIN SEATS. The weather broke fine this morning, and voters were flocking to the polling booths from 10 o'clock onwards. Both aides were working hard, and were confident of success. Tho principal interest seemed to contra in Dunedin North and Dunedin Control, where keen and close fights are expected. The supporters of Labor iu these two electorates got to work early, and were leaving no stone unturned to further the interest* of Messrs Walker (North) and Munro (Central. *On the other hand, Air Thomson's and Mr Statham's committees, wore very much alivo, and were putting forth everv effort on behalf of their candidates, ihere was every indication of real live contests in theso two electorates. In Dunedin South Mr Sidey's supporters were very confident of their candidate having a decided majority, while in Dunedin West, a strong working tommittea were watching the interests of Mr Stewart.- The returning officers iu lhe four City electorates had all their »rrangements well in hand, and the remit* from the smaller booths should he known shortly after 7 o'clock. Tho Licensing Question also appeared to bo creating a good deal of interest. The trade and the Prohibition party were both working hard. Motor cars and vehicles of all sorts were running people to the polls. So many motor cars were never seen out in Dunedin before on me day. CHALMERS. Considerable interest was displayed at Port Chalmers during the forenoon, a feature of the day being the number of motor cars engaged in conveying electors to the polling booths. A heavy poll was anticipated dating the afternoon. DISPLAYING THE RESULTS. A FULL AND COMPREHENSIVE RETURN. In view of the great interest displayed all over New Zealand in to-day's cam paign, we have made very complete ar ranyements for getting the results for warded to this office with all expedition. From otir illuminated hoarding in Crawford street will be shown, in addition to the returns on the political issue, the results of the voting for both Local Option and National Prohibition. The fact of " reduced fields." to uso a sporting phrase, for nearly all the electorates, in order to ensure a straight-out party decision, will ensure the results being announced earlier than usual. Probably the finals for the first of the City electorates will be ported •some time aftdr 8 o'clock—certainly before tho half-hour. The earliest interim returns, those from some oi tho smaller City polling places, may be looked for shortly after 7 o'clock. The candidates, as* on former occasion;?, will address the public in Crawford street after they have spoken at the declaration of the polls in their own electorates.

TELEPHONE MESSAGES CANNOT RE ANSWERED.

Under no circumstances will information be given by us to-night per medium of tho telephone as to the progress of the political or licensing contest:-*. Subscribers will understand that the work of this establishment is carried on under high pressure on election night, and that it is unreasonable to expect that any interruption therewith can be permitted. Every effort will he directed to having tho returns published promptly in the manner above indicated. OTAGO CENTRAL. "Our Own" wires: Mr Bodkin had a splendid wind-up meeting last ni.u'ht. and met with a fine reception. He is sure of a big majority in this part, of the electorate. CLUTHA. Our Tapanni correspondent telegraphed this morning:—Mr J. E. Jenktnaon addressed a fair meeting h-ust night, and abused the Government in place of announcing the Opposition plans for tliefuture The poll here started early, and is likely to bo a full one. Mr Malcolm is certain of a majority of votes. THE ISSUES. WHAT THE~PAPERS SAY. [SrECIAL TO THE STAR.] WELLINGTON, December 10. The 'Times' says: "There are momentous issues depending on the verdict of tho people to-day. Is the work of the democratic acrievement to go on "'. Are the conditions of employment to bo further improved? Are great estates to be made available for closer settlement ' Is money to become cheap and , plentiful once more? Is representative government to be converted into a farce, or tr> become an effective reality? Are the squatters to be compelled to bear their fair share of the burden of taxation? Are duties to be removed from the necessaries of life ? Is the right to freedom of conscience to bo maintained ? These, and many other questions which are dependent for their solution upon the supremacy of the popular cause, will be determined by the votes of the people today. If democratic electors are mindful of the traditions of the glorious past, if they are resolved upon tho accomplishment of even greater achievements in the future, if they are intent upon a happy, prosperous, and contented future for their children, as well as better conditions for themselves, they will voto the Massey party out, wrest the power of administrative control from the squattocracy, and re-establish a Liberal Government in power by a. substantial working majority, so that they may continue their labors for tho Attainment of higher ideals and the promotion of the general welfare."

The ' Dominion * says : " There is no need at this late stage to review at length the issues which are to be determined by the electors to-day. They have seen the bold attempt made by a party of dangerous extremists to substitute mob tyranny for constitutional methods. Staoding alone, ths irresponsible and disorderly Red Fed. faction would bo comparatively insignificant, but the political alliance of these Labor Socialist extremists with, the Wardist party constitute a menace, which no citizen can afford to ignore. Instead of standing up boldly for the popular rights, freedom of speech, and the protection of the community against lawless aggression, the Ward party have chosen to pander to the extremists in the hope of gaining office by their aid. The electors liavo the opportunity to-day of striking a great blow for political and social freedom—freedom of Bpeech and the maintenance of those conditions which mako individual happiness and prosperity possible and facilitate democratic progress. A blow can be struck only by voting for tho supporters of the Reform Government. The alternative i» to vote for a sot of Social Pests, or for weaklings who are prepared to let them work their will. This is emphatically on occasion when not a single voto should be wasted. Greatly aa they preponderate in point of numbers, the men and women who stand for clean public life and good government * cannot afford to. take any risks. Every vote wasted in this election, is a point gained for anarchy; every vote cast for Reform" is a □ail in. the coffin of the Red Federation, who- stand for anarchy."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141210.2.40

Bibliographic details

THE DAY OF DECISION., Evening Star, Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

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1,109

THE DAY OF DECISION. Evening Star, Issue 15672, 10 December 1914

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