Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE KING'S VISIT.

A WEEK AT THE FRONT. AX AERIAL BODYGUARD. LONDON, December 8. An "Eye-witness" with tho British troops at headquarters furnishes tho following story of the Kind's visit: On .Monday Hi 3 Majesty inspected the base hospital.*, inehniiiiir" the Indian.-*'. Me reached Sir John l'renelfs headquarters in the afternoon, and spent Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday touring round inspecting the different army corps. Complete units, except the men actually in the trenches, generally paraded on the ■roadside. After the King drove, through, taking the salute of each unit, three cheers were given, the spontaneity showing the j>enuine enthusiasm that had Ken aroused by tho Sovereign's presence among the war-worn troops. At several places the troops formed a hoilow square, and the King presented decorations, including Victoria Crosses. On Tuesday morning His Majesty visited the Indians, and received the Indian Princes. In the afternoon he met MM. Poincare and Viviani. and conferred the Grand Cross upon both and General Joffre; Grand Crosses ot St. Michael and St. George upon Generals Mandhtty, Durbal, Connea, and Demity and Maitres Dubois and Grossetti. On Wednesday tho King motored 70 miles, inspecting the Third" Army Corps. He visited the convalescent homes and inspected the men in trench kit. consisting goatskin coats, woolly Balaclava caps, and sandbags lillod with, straw for tho legs.

On Thursday His Majesty visited the First and Second Army Corps, and watched the German bombardment of Ypres and lighting on the Yser Canal. On Friday the King inspected the headquarters, including the Intelligence Department, where 3,000 messages aro handled daily. In the afternoon he went to the Belgian frontier, where King Albert received him. On Satin day he inspected the Flying Corps. Throughout His Majesty's visit tho aviators maintained a continuous aerial patrol above the Royal party, ensuring their safety. Finally His Majesty issued an order expressing his admiration for tho splendid manner in which they had fought a powerful and relentless enemy. He was particularly impressed by the soldierly, healthy, and cheerful appearance of the troops, and concluded: " 1 assure you of my proud confidence and the gratitude of myself and your fellow-countrymen." KITCHENER'S ARMY. TRADE UNIONIST RECRUITS. LONDON, December 8. j Two hundred and twenty-five thousand j trade unionists have enlisted, of whom j 103,000 are miners and 45,000 railwaymen.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141209.2.10.2

Bibliographic details

THE KING'S VISIT., Issue 15671, 9 December 1914

Word Count
381

THE KING'S VISIT. Issue 15671, 9 December 1914

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working