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ENEMY GOING EAST.

FLANDERS BEING EVACUATED.

THE NEXT LINE OF DEFENCE,

LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7, at 9.25 a.m.) The 'Observer's' Amsterdam correspondent says that a mystery envelops the movements of the German forces in Belgium. They are apparently largely a " bluff " to deceive the Allies, giving the appearance of a strong offensive, while they are all the time sending large forces eastward. The Germans have constructed a wall of concrete, 60 miles long, from Eccloo to the south-west of Brussels, whither they will retire if the Allies take the offensive

ENEMY CONFIRM IT.

VERMELLES ABANDONED,

AMSTERDAM, December 6.

(Received December 7, at 10.50 a.m.) An official message from Berlin states : "We have evacuated Vermelles in accordance with our concerted plan. Its further retention would entail needless sacrifices. Before retiring wo blew up the buildings which remained standing. [Vermelles is in France, between Lens and La Basseo.]

FORTIFYING THE RHINE

GERMANY LOOKS AHEAD

LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7, at 10.50 a.m.) Private letters from Germany state that foreigners have been expelled from the eastern banks of the Rhine, which are beinj; prepared for powerful defence works.

GERMAN TROOPS,

HARDSHIPS AND SUICIDE,

(London ' Times' and Sydney ' Sun' Serrices.)

LONDON, December 6. The Hague reports state that the morale of the Germans is seriously affected by the hardships of the battle of the Yser. The number of suicides is increasing, especially among men with families, who feel that, even _if th»y escape unhurt from the war, their health will have been permanently impaired.

TRENCHES LIKE BROOKS

(London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Servioes.)

LONDON, December 6. Tho Dutch Press state that the weather is rainy and stormy. Somo of tho German trenches are like brooks. The soldiers remain in them two clays, and then have a day's rest.

V CORPORAL'S STORY

NO PRISONERS TAKEN,

AND THE REASON WHY,

LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7, at 8.20 a.m.) Corporal Minns, of the first battalion of the Queen's, who was wounded at Ypres, reports that his section was instructed to capture a house. They were handicapped by a woman whom tho Germans forced to stand at the door in front of their bayonets, while her child was held at a window from which a German maxim was firing. The section captured the house, and lost 13 men in doing so. They found the child pinned with a sword to tho windowframe. Thev also found 23 Germans in the cellar. r< I left my men," added the corporal, " and they took no prisoners."

STEADY PROGRESS

ON WESTERN FRONT.

PARIS, December 6.

(Received December 7, at 9.15 a.m.)

A communique states: Near the house in Pocscle (mentioned in another part of this issue), we destroyed a small German fort.

We were successful in a duel of heavy artillery in the Champagne district. The *" sapping " war continues in th« Argonne, where we are slowly advancing. We advanced slightly south and east 11 Vareunes, where we silenced the German artillery. FRENCH ARTILLERY. A LESSON~LEARNED AND SUPERIORITY ACHIEVED. (London 'Time*' and Sydney 'Sun' Service*.) LONDON, December 6. The London ' Times's' correspondent says that the French artillery on the Aisne during the past month nave been demonstrating their superiority. It was not realised at first that shell-firo 'was so important, and supplies were such that it was necessary to use it sparingly. Ample supplies are now available, and the French gunners ara maintaining oxcellent practice, notably in the destruction cf wire entanglements. KING GEORGE. HOME FROM FRANCE. - WENT INTO THE TRENCHES, THOUGH WARNED OF DANGER, LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7, at 8.45 a.m.) The King has returned to London after his visit to the front. The Central News Paris correspondent states that at o, certain point of His Majesty's tour the Staff suggested that it was unsafe to visit the trenches, which had recently been the object of the enemy's artillery fire. Tho King replied? "All the more reason why ! I should go. There is, no reason why i I should not take risks. The soldiers take them."

The King then, went into the trenches and chatted with the troops. ,

ANOTHER V.C. A BRAVE HIGHLANDER. LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7,. at 8.45 a.m.) The Victoria Cross has been awarded to Private George Wilson, of the Highland Light Infantry, who attacked a hostile machine gun near Vcrheuil on September 14, shot the officer and six men, and captured the gun. CAP AND TUNIC FOR WIG AND GOWN. (London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Services.) LONDON, December 6. Five hundred British barristers are now in the forces fighting at the front. THE ZEPPELIN SHEDS. NO MORE RAIDS WANTED. (London ' Times' and Sydney ' Sun' Services.) LONDON, December 6. A Swiss engineer relates that a great network construction has been built to protect tho Zeppelin sheds at Friedrichshafen. The scntir.ek and anti-aircraft guns have been doubled, and five powerful searchlights installed in the lulls to illumino tho whole district. STILL IN* DARKNESS. (London ' Times ' and Sydney " Sun' Senrioe*.) LONDON, December 6. A Zurich journalist, after a tour through Germany, declares that, while much dissatisfaction has been caused by the defeat* of the Austrians, the Germans are still convinced that they are going to win. Grciit hopes are reposed in the Jehad, and the populace are daily expecting to hoar of serious disturbances in India.

DEVASTATED BELGIUM

GERMANY SUPPRESSES EVIDENCE.

A TWIN .'IE OF CONSCIENCE

ANTWERP, December 6. Received December 1, at 9.15 a.m.)

Germany is laking measures to severely punish thf photographing of the. ruin caused by the war.

AT YPRES.

WANTON DESTRUCTION

LONDON, December 6.

(Received December 7, at 10.50 a.m.) An "Eye-witness" with the British Headquarters confirms the wantonness and vindictiveness of tho bombardment of the Town Hall and the Cathedral at Ypres, which began after the failure of the final effort to capture tho city, .ind ceased immediately the buildings had been destroyed. It served no military purpose whatever.

A PEN PICTURE

BY AN AMERICAN-

LONDON, December 6. (Received December 7, at 9.15 a.m.)

Mr Waters (representative of the 'American Christian World ') has returned from Belgium. He saw oevr 1,000 poorly clad women in Antwerp, many snuggling babies to their breasts, waiting in the snow and slush for doles of food under the shadow of a big hotel where the German soldiers were making merry. Between Antwerp and Brussels tho road was full of refugees tramping homewards to their ruined villages. It was like journeying through a huge cemetery. There were graves everywhere, always between ruined houses. T"ho graves were marked with bayonets, caps, helmets, and in one caso by a child' 6 shoo. Desolation reigned all round—trees felled, crops run to seed anil rotting, women grubbing in the ruins of their former homes.

Only two weeks' food supply was held in Brussels when he left.

AN UNHAPPY- MAYOR

(London ' Timt*' and Sydney ' Bun' Senrfcea.)

LONDON, December 6. Tho Burgomaster of Moix writes that he is confined to prison and subjected to the treatment prescribed for murderers.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141207.2.54.2

Bibliographic details

ENEMY GOING EAST., Issue 15669, 7 December 1914

Word Count
1,158

ENEMY GOING EAST. Issue 15669, 7 December 1914

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