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A CALL TO ARMS

[This hitherto unpublished poem by Tennyson has been most kindly sent to us by the present Lord Tennyson. It has been adapted to a melody by Emily Lady Tennvson, arranged with symphonies and accompaniment by Sir Frederick Bridge, and is to be sung at the Albert Hall on tiro afternoon of Saturday, October 10, by Mr Kennerley Rumford and the Royal Choral Society conducted by Sir Frederick Bridge. Tho poem seems almost as if it were written for tho present crisis.—‘ Spectator,’ October 3.) 0 where is he the simple fool Who says that wars are over? What bloody portent flashes there Across tho Strait of Dover? Nina hundred thousand slaves in arms May seek to bring us under; But England lives, and still will live, For we’ll crush the despot yonder. . Are we ready, Britons all, To answer foes with thunder ? Arm, arm, arm 1 0 shame on selfish patronage— It is the country’s ruin— Come, put tho right man in his place, And up now, and be doing! O gather, gallant volunteers In every town and village, For there aro tigers—fiends, not men— May violate, burn, and pillage I Are you ready, Britons all, To answer foes with thunder? Arm, arm, arm! Up steut-limb’d yeomen, leave awhile The fattening of your cattle— And, if ipdeed ye wish for. Peace, Be ready for the Battle ! To fight the Battle of the World, Of progress and humanity, Ip spite of his eight million lies And bastard Christianity! Are we ready, Britons all, To answer foes with thunder? Arm, arm, arm! • Texxtsox.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141205.2.68

Bibliographic details

A CALL TO ARMS, Issue 15668, 5 December 1914

Word Count
265

A CALL TO ARMS Issue 15668, 5 December 1914

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