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IN SOUTH AFRICA.

LOYALIST SUCCESSES. PRETORIA, December 2. (Received December 3, at 8.40 a.m.)

O—cial: The rebel General Weasel's commando on Sunday attacked Commandant Emmett. The rebels were repulsed, losing three killed and 18 wounded. Five loyalists were wounded.

Commandant Trichardt captured 14 rebels elsewhere.

Among Commandant Emmett’s prisoners are Captain Vandani (General Wesscl’s adjutant) and a well-known character who was prominent in the capturing of Harrismith.

LOSS OF THE BULWARK,

A SURVIVOR’S NARRATIVE,

LONDON, December 2.

(Received December 3, at 12.35 p.rn.)

Stoker Duffy, who is in hospital, states that he was breakfasting when the explosion occurred. There was no time to wonder what had happened. The vessel trembled, and he found himself going down. He held his breath when below the water, and then he found he was free of the vessel. His chest felt fit to burst when he came to the surface, but he took several deep breaths before he was again sucked down. He again came up, and when the smoke had disappeared he found that the great ship had gone. This gave him a terrible feeling, but he got hold of a hammock and held it until a boat picked him up. SIR ROGER CASEMENTS ANTICS, LONDON, December 2. There is much comment over Sir Roger Casement’s action, in view of his public position. Many demand that he bo deprived of his pension. His friends suggest that he is suffering from mental derangement. CANADA’S INDUSTRIAL LIFE. OTTAWA, December 2. (Received December 5. at 12.50 p.m.) Mr Watters, president of the Dominion Trades Congress, states that the letting ofEnglish Army contracts in Canada is an admirable feature of War Office policy, thereby giving much employment at a critical period. Labor conditions throughout the Dominion still required attention and Government assistance. There, were large numbers of unemployed, despite the heavy recruiting.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141203.2.45.8

Bibliographic details

IN SOUTH AFRICA., Evening Star, Issue 15666, 3 December 1914

Word Count
305

IN SOUTH AFRICA. Evening Star, Issue 15666, 3 December 1914

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