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ENEMY’S DILEMMA.

CALAIS OR RETREAT? PRIVATION AND DISEASE PLAY HAVOC IN THEIR RANKS. DESERTION RIFE. LONDON, December 2. Mr Donohoe, the ‘Daily Chionicle’ war correspondent, says that the tier mans in Belgium are buffering acutely from me winter. As a triumphant march on Calais was anticipated, no winter quarters were provided, and many, being without shelter, are dying like flies. Desertions are daily increasing The Dutch treat military fugitives with every consideration, and supply then, with clothing and warm tood. The flooding of Flanders has had a disastrous effect on the Germans. Pneumonia, rheumatism, and typhus have attacived many of the unwounded, and the death-roll is heavy.

But perhaps the Germans’ worst and most feared enemy' remains. It lias been found impossible to adequately feed the armies facing the Allies. Every available train is being utilised hurrying food to the front. Fresh troops are arriving, largely intended to repince the killed, wounded, and victims of disease. The German Staff are between two conflicting resolves, being unable to decide whether to fling away a fresh army in an attempt to reach Calais, or cut the terrible task short and quit a country which has entombed so many of the Kaiser’s bravest soldiers.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141203.2.16.2

Bibliographic details

ENEMY’S DILEMMA., Evening Star, Issue 15666, 3 December 1914

Word Count
201

ENEMY’S DILEMMA. Evening Star, Issue 15666, 3 December 1914

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