Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE CENSORSHIP.

I don’t quite see what is the matter with people who ate continually harping on the English Censor. You don’t seem to see that it’s the correspondents who lack energy and wit to get the news who are filling the papers with dismal accounts of the London censorship, while the correspondents who expend energy and have the wit are getting the news and laughing in their sleeves. 1 have staff writers who have been in England, Belgium, and Prance for 10 weeks. During the time I have received from them by way of London about 40 mail stories and five cable articles, two of which were 1,400 words long. They sent me a duplicate of every story, letter or cable by steamer passengers. I have carefully compared the cable stories and many of the mail articles. Not in one case was a word missing or a word changed or a word inserted. 1 have critically examined all envelopes, and have yet to see any evidence of tampering. No doubt the London Censor slashes at stuff about firing lino operations of the army and political matter which may give encouragement to the enemy. But the United States of America did that against its own papers during the war against a bunch of Bcmi-savageri in the Philippines, and again last spring during the war in Vera Cruz, which they sav was not a, war. What right have we in the United States to criticise censorship? Moreover, why criticise London censorship and not German censorship? Have you seen a news letter from Germany coming by any other route than by Loudon which said anything eke than that Germany at war is a Garden of Eden and her armies winning consistently everywhere, all the time? 1 haven’t. The burden of criticism from Germany and elsewhere is that America gets its news with an English and French flavor. Rot! There arc more American correspondents in London and Paris to-day than can fill fill the American newspapers. Practically everything printed in America to-day on the great war, excepting the special signed articles, 1b written by American reporters abroad. One interest alone has 10 American men and women on the field. When their copy is touched by the Censor they are mighty sure to make a shriek about it. And I’ll back these 10 people against all the world as writers of the truth as they see it first hand. Where do our people manage to get? To Germany? Not on your life! The only one permitted inside the German boundaries, after strenuous efforts, was a German American in our employ, and he was arrested twice. What do we get from him by mail and cable? Nothing that shows that he wrote it. Just Garden of Eden reports and victory. Neither Car correspondents nor any other correspondents showing reasonable discretion have been arrested in England or France. Have you heard of any correspondents penetrating Germany who have net been arrested? Of course, they are released with apologies —after there’s been lime to examine their trunks, satchels, pockets, and rooms.—Correspondent ‘New York Sun.’

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141130.2.49.9

Bibliographic details

THE CENSORSHIP., Issue 15663, 30 November 1914

Word Count
517

THE CENSORSHIP. Issue 15663, 30 November 1914

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working