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AMERICAS OPPORTUNITY

[Written for the ‘ Evening Star bv Wingfield Scott. J Busines: is resuming its normal in Califomia. With British and Japanese men-ot-war patrolling the steamer routes, with the German fleet believed to be making its headquarters in the Marshall Islands, with war ri-ks easily obtainable and with eschango conditions on London easing up, exporting to Great Britain has resumed (ho ordinary tenor of its way. Frequent cargoes of wheat from Puget Sound and Oregon ports, of barlev from California, and of canned and dried fruits from California, all for England, are going out.. Tin; sea.ro is over- Locally conditions are fairly bright. California U less afiecr d by war conditions in Europe, other (baa cxnoriiiir, than any other part of the rnited Stated The war has scat tha price of sugar soaring, and this sear the beet hUT-ir houses of the West are iu for an exceedingly profitable season, whereas most of men (xpccted a loss, ovmg to the r-'di’ctiou of I lie tariff. The eliminat ion el Go-manv. Austria, and Russia from tbs world's sugar market is responsible for this. What, Ci.liroiniii will do in sugarmnkmg in mis unless tbo war comes to an end—and even’ l hen-is Most of the armar beet seed used in this State comes from Germany, and beat need is now an impossibility except by way of Holland, and mighty precarious by that, route. _ Genera! merchandising is in fair shape. Prices for ail of the products of the State are high, except for dried fruit. The dryers and simpers are in something of a quandary about ilm future. Germany ordinarily could be depended on to rake about one-quarter or the nruues of the Stale, the. norma! crop being about 100,000 short tons and the exports to that country being about 25,000 short tons annually. Fortunately for prices, there is a short, crop this year, and perhaps the* American market will absorb it. Iner® is ordinarily a heavy export trade in other dried fruits to Eurojie, mainly to Franco and Germany, particularly iu apricots. Tint hufi ;ie s s is counted as lost this year. Much fruit was lost, this season owing to the decision of the fruit, dryers to buy nothin'' *hat was not previously contracted for. This" set the average fruit-grower to drying on bis own account, where he could command (ho monev needed to carry lb© crop. The less forehanded bad to let their year's product go to waste. Tin-rc is a tremendous amount of interest iu California at the present time in manufacturing. Whether a!! of the agitation will end in an extension of the manufacturing industries is something that no man can tell. California appear* to be wakening to the fact that it has the cheapest, iron in tha United Slavs, by calling on the Chinese anicle, and the cheapest power. Electricity aiid c’ii have generally replaced coal as a sourco of power, but for soma reason the real meaning of the change was not borno in on (he people until a world upheaval like tho present brought home to them a realisation of how generally this Slate is dependent on Europe aiid on the Eastern States of tha Union for its manufactures. Raising rollon, wo. do not manufacture half of what wo raise. Producing wool, there is not a mill in the State, We ship hides to Massachusetts, over 3,000 miles away, and bring the- hides back in the form of shoes and harness. We rake practically all of tho lima beans used in the United States, ship them dry to the Eastern States, and buy lima beans canned in Indianapolis, 3,000 miies away. The beau situation would be amusing if it were not such a typical commentary on actual conditions. You can go into the heart of the bean-producing district cf California, Oxnard, and buy ‘‘pork and beans" in tins, tha beans raised right there and the canning don© on the Atlantic coast. All of the stress caused_ by the war will change many tilings. It is a certainty that the Linked States will never again depend on Germany to us great an extent for its chemicals. Likewise, there will never again be the dependence on Paris for tho styles. Paris is creating no styles this year—Yew York will be the fashion centre for tlx United States. £an Francisco, October £3,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141128.2.59

Bibliographic details

AMERICAS OPPORTUNITY, Issue 15662, 28 November 1914

Word Count
724

AMERICAS OPPORTUNITY Issue 15662, 28 November 1914

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