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The Evening Star FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1914.

11.i1.5j. IjL'i.wahk. a fire-Dreadnought

battleship of 15.CC0 tons, carrying lorn - 12m guns, and having « complement of 780 men, was blown tin in Sheerr.ess Harbor at 8 o'clock yostorday morning. V~ nion only being saved. Tho list in silence. Such is til? tenor <f :i brief menage received in this i.H'n.v ;iL half-past 10 this morning. The news, i-t it ho said ipiito frankly, is sad new?, aiid more than offsets the general trend of tho tables. T'no Xavy, unlike tho Army, canot lm indefinitely extended as the < utromo of popular appeals and of more or K-.h irrelevant addresses. For all practical purposes the moment war comes thd Xavy, as far as its personnel is concerned, crystallises into an ascertainaMy kin.wu quantity. It is not possible to do more than hasten the completion of ships already on the stocks, nor, after calling up ail available reserves, to make seamen. In a few months yon can make a soldier out of an intelligent youth who has done something in a rifle ,or cadet corps, but you cannot mako a seaman under three to four years. Some authorities say that five years are needed, and yet others hold that wliilo it is possible U> mako a. Dreadnought in two years, ittakes seven in which to make- an able seaman. And it is these things, in the ease of a nation which depends wholly upon its ability to maintain its supremacy at sea, that constitute the anxioua factor when less- or disaster overtakes any unit of tho British .Navy. Tho total personnel of tho Navy on ?.larch 31 last was 146,000 officers and men, and tho Royal Fleet, Naval and Naval Volunteer Reserves would be little it' any more than S),GCO. In other word*, when lvnglanu tUclarcd war on August 4 laet she had less than 200,000 officers and seamen to man her Navy, and there are- no means by which tho number can be materially augmented. Tho fato of England and of the Umpire is dependent, in the good providence of God, upon the braiii3 and nerves and morale of this comparatively small number. Every life, therefore, is an asset of exceptional value, and even- incident connected with its loss has been, perhaps, more closely scanned than havo the deaths of many thousands of gftuuiii fellows on kind. Hut Email though tho numbers ot our seamen v.er.i in comparison with the myriad hosts on land, the ships and .personnel of the British Navy constituted a greater and mors l magnificent aggregation of naval strength than was ever before known since men first fought on the sea. There has- bee:: no Armada of the past to equal it, and there is no navy in being to-day that can approach it either in ships or in men. Germany knew this, and Germany has acted accordingly. At the outset of the. war there were thoso who said that the German Fleet must co:no out and mako a swift, sudden, aggressive attack upon the? British Fleet. Four mouths have passed, and the German Fleet has not so far done so; but it has not been idle. It has done what it said it would do —sought to wear down British patience, to weaken tho nerve of our men, to destroy their moral?, and by means of the submarine, tho mine, and treachery endeavor to reduce the fighting strength of tho British Fle«;t to something like the level of its own, when, and not before, it will put all to the hazard of battle. Germany has done'well, as well, we imagine, as she could have hoped for. Over 8,100 British seamen and officers, a larger number than Nelson's three groat battles cost the nation, have been put out of action without a single decisive big engagement. The mine and tho submarine are responsible for the chief British losaos, though the Good Hope and Monmouth went down in fair fight.

The Price of Admiralty.

How the Bulwark came to her swift and, awful end w» do HQt 22$ dafißftfttx

know. Thero was an explosion, and when the smoke cleared there was no sign of the battleship. She and her men had sunk for ever boneath the wave. Mr Churchill told the House of Commons that tho exports were convinced that tho cause of destruction was internal not external; but how or why it was <»o wo do not know at this hour of writ" ing. What seems only too certain is that ' over 750 brave men have been added to tho more than 4,300 who have already paid the "price of Admiralty." Wo mourn their passing deeply, sorrowfully, sincerely, and we do so knowing that their deaths can and will have no other effect than to awaken the Empire to register anew its unalterable determination to seo this war through, even though its course be marked by over new Gethsemanes and ever fresh Calvaries. The story of our Empire and of our sea supremacy is one of centuries of sacrifice: Wo have fod our sea for a thousand years, And she calls us, still unfed. Though there's never a wavo of oil her waves But is marked by our English dead. Wo have stra'wed our best to the wind's unrest, To tho shark and the shearing gull, If blood bo the price of admiralty, Lord God! we ha' paid in full. Yes, we have paid the price not once but a hundred times. We paid it yesterday, and we shall pay it again to-day and tomorrow and always until our destiny is fulfilled and war shall cease to curse tlw earth.

Tire Licensing Amendment Act, 1914, came into force on the

Licensing second day of this month, Restrictions, and responsible members of the "trade" would do v-pll to make a careful note of the inrv.ortant amendments to the licensing law. When the Bill was boforo Tarliament r.ublie attention was focussed on the pro- * vosal to reduce the majority required ; '.:> carry National Prohibition from 60 ; to E5 per cent., and after that proposal ; had been rejected by a narrow majority ! in the House of Representatives general interest collapsed. It was popularly bc■ieved that the Bill, now robbed of its :nost vital purpose, was nothing moro than a formal measuro proposing a number of technical alterations to the existing law. As a matter of fact, many of the provisions of the Bill, which wcro adopted by Parliament and made operative, us from the 2nd inst., represent radical alterations. Many licensed victuallers who have wisely taken legal advico upon tho actual purposes of the amendments describe them as " annoying restrictions." In such matters description is determined by tho extent of individual interest in the operative effect of the. legislative changes in tho law. Those who would legislate intoxicating liquor 'out of the affairs oE men will undoubtedly accept the recent amendments as very necessary restrictions on a "trade" that in tho pvist has invited determined attack became of the loose and foolish manner in which several licensees conducted their business—a slackness that has alienated the support of moderate men and women who do not believe in Xo-Jicen.se as a complete remedy of the evils of intoxication. It will be of common interest to note a few of tho principal alterations which were effected by the latest (by no means the last) lic-crneing legislation. It is now illegal to "sell, supply, or send ''any liquor intended to bo taken into a " no-licer.sert district except on and in "pursuance of tlu. terms, of an order "iig':cd by and s'.af'ng tho address and "'occupation of thi> purchaser thereof." The penalty for a first offence of this naturo if £b'' or one month's imprisonment, £IOO or three months for a second oiTeii-e, arid for a third offence £IOO or six months, with possible disqualification for holding a, license. This provision in tho amended Act may be an "annoying restriction,'' but legislators apparently believed ino doubt they had good grounds for their belief) that it was necessary, in ovder t<> voslrijt a too free distribution of liquor in Xo-licenoe districts. The address and occupation of purchasers have now to be i-tated— a provision which renders ilk-gal the piaeticc with several licensees of sending liquor in pursuance of a telephone order stating that a written order would follow. There, are always licensees who- will foolishly persist in " playing " with tho provisions of the law, and thus incur hauler restrictions. It has taken a long time- and many salutary lessons to teach a ccitain class of licensee and liquor trader (the clas-6 is diminishing rapidly) that the quickest way to Xational Prohibition is to brvak the licensing law. Another important provision in tha amended law ia that it is now illegal to supply 'iqnor to any person under 21 for consumption either on or off licensed premises. Heretofore licensees could supply bottled liquor vo any pereon over 13 years of age. Few people will challenge the wisdom of this provision, and it ia to be hoped that all licensees will faithfully honor its terms and eafeguard its purpoee. Licensees should note, too, that the season oi good-will towards till men does not relax the legal restrictions upon the distribution of liquor into No-liccnsa areas. Licensees cannot mako a Christmas present of any liquor to any resident in a Xolicensu district without an order from eucii resident. After the fiict oi April, 1915, no person under 21 (male or female) shall be employed in any capacity in any bar, public or private, during tho prescribed hours for selling liquor. Tire penalty for a breach of this provision has been fixed at £lO. The aim of the Legislature is ckaily in tire direction of increasing tlw restrictions against, tin supply of liquor to youths, and against, tho employment of youthful pcnu>ii6 j;i licensed bars. These restrictions may bo annoying to several licensees, but the majority of men and women in tho trade will readily acknowledge the wisdom of the purpose of such legislation.

[The remainder of cur leading matter wit! again bo found on page i of this tSSUO.J

Mr W. C. MacCregor drew laughter and applause from tho audience at the Garrison Hall last night when he said, in the course of his remarks on the war: "Jf \va may judge from our newspapers, we aro ourselves engaged in several wars. Besides the triennial parliamentary war between the ' ins ' and the ' outg,' we have at least three civil wars hero in Otago. First, there is the old struggle between the Prohibitionists and the publicans; thou we have tho divine* themselves ranged in hostile camps over tho Bibk-in-Scnools Question —engaged in looking for proselytes when they might be encouraging recruits, and hunting heretics wlien they might be chasing Germans. Finally there is our old friend the National Peace Council, engaged in their abaurd propaganda." "Would it not bo better," asked Mr MacGregor, " for these good people to compose their differences until after tho war is over, and thus remove what might very well be a pernicious influence on the young men upon whom we are calling to volunteer to fight -for us in this gre.it and serious conflict?" The expenses oi the Presbyterian General Awembly for the sitting at Auckland next year are estimated by tho Rev. W J. Comrie, tho treasurer, at £I,OOO. This was stated; during a discussion yesterday.

Mr Faulin telephoned at 2 p.m. : Squally gale- from S.W. to S.E. ; heavy ram, sleet, and hail. An Auckland wire says: A fire fit Otahuhu at midnight destroyed a two-story dwelling owned by Mr J. Andrews, and occupied by Mr S. Brunette (watchmaker and cycle agent) and Miss Harlis. (confectioner).

A scene o£ unusual enthusiasm took placo in the Garrison Hall last night when, in response to an invitation by Mr .J. A. Park, some 40 or 50 recently-en-rolled volunteers stepped en to tho "platform. Tho cheers which greeted them wero loud and long, and as they canve down again into tho hody of the hall the audience broke into that ancient hymn of praia 9 ' For they aro jolly goad fellows.' Subsequently some 26 new recruits cams to the table and handed in their names to the officers. Each ono was accorded an ovation, and when the band ployed ' Soldiers of the King' the enthusiasm rose to a high pitch. One one occasion there was tremendous cheering as the well-known figure of a popular exMayor waa seen walking up the passage, but this turned to hearty laughter when lie hastily took a vacant seat instead of proceeding to the recruiting table. In connection with the shortage of flour, ifnrraway and Sons announce that, having been unable to get supplies of wheat at any price, tho flour department of their mill at Gren Island is temporarily closed down.

According to the roll as printed there were 142 ministerial members of the Presbyterian Assembly entitled to sit at the session that ended yesterday. Looking over that roll to-day, our reporter who attended continuously can pick out 60 who fpobe. By tliis reckoning, 92 did not contribute fo the debates. A lew of these P2 may have risen to ask a question or something of that sort, but they certainly did not 'speak" In the ordinary senee of the term. Even amongst the 50 set down as the talkers, eom.e 6aid very little. It is eafe to assert that the groat bulk of the speechmuking was done by not more than one-fourth of the ministers present Hevt-nle-cn presbyteries were represented. The representatives of four of the.-o Presbyteries—Tarauaki Wairaiapa, Timarti, and Dunstan--were virtually silent all the tinv?. Of Dunediu's 53 minister*, 17 spoke; Auckland had 7 speakers and 8 who did not »rv?ak, Wellington 5 and 2, Christchurch 4"and 10. Wvstland enjoys the sole distinction of having no siknt representatives. Her three men were heard.

A representative meeting of the Church Worship Society was held in Jackcon s Hotel on Wednesday moraine- The Rev. W. Gray Dixon presided. In the course of his address tho president made feeling reference to tho death of Hey. A. Thomson, late treasurer of the society. The uddrwa vis .given by the Rev. J. P. Fleming, of the English Presbyterian CluiroL Considerable discission took 1 placo on matters connected with uniformity in the worship of tho church. The following were appointed office-bearers for the vear :—E-ev. W. Gray Dixon, president"; Revs. J. Paterson and R. E- Davies, vice-presidents; Rev. P. C. Dnrwan, treasurer; Rev. R. Francis, secretary.

At the representative scesicn of the South Canterbury Methodist Synod increases wero reported in church membership, in Sunday school scholars, and in attendants at public worship. Resolution*? wero passed anent the licensing poll, on the gambling evil, and alio on the prevalent cf sexual vice. The proposal to establish a conference «xpcn«ca fund was apm-oved, tho details to be left to conference. Tho proposal to extend the term of ministerial appointments beyond five years to any ono church was approved by 17 votft3 to 7. The conference remit that each extended appointment he -only made by a 75 per cent, vote o? the conference was felt to be undemocratic, and it waa considered that the question should be determined by a. face majority. In order, however, to provide an adequate Rnicguard it was decided to recommend that such appointments he made by a 55 per cent, majority of conference. Tho Rev. G. F. Stockwell was elected representative to the Christchurch Conference. It was decided to hold the next Synod in Oamaru. Tho Public Service Bill makes it an offence, punishable by a fine of £SO, for a member of Parliament to try to help a Civil servant. Mr A. E. Glovor, Opposition candidato and ex-member for Auckland Central, thinks that every public ser-vant-with a legitimate grievance should have the risrht to approach the member for his electorate. With charming candor ho said tho other evening : " I bolievo I owe the country about £1,300 already" for helping aggrieved public servants. In consequence of the speeding-up of tho trains in the North Island, tho ferry steamers will leave Wellington from tha Ist prox. at 7.45 nightly, instead of 8 o'clock, as at present. This extra 15 minutes may mean catching, the first express'from Christchurch when the weather conditions cause a short delay in the run down.

It was noticeable at Mr Field's meeting at Nelson the other night that u large number of women, while listening to tiie remarks of the candidata, wero busily engaged in knitting socks for those who arc fighting tho battles of the Empire in Europe.

It appears that the Stamp Department has been levying toll on receipts for tho " separation " allowances of members of the Expeditionary Force—a clearly illegal proceeding—and the fact v:as brought under the notice of the Defence Minister while he was in town the other day by a gentleman interested on behalf of himself and others in a like position. This morning he received the following wire from the Kon. Mr Allen:—''On inquiry, I find that payment on allotments made to relatives of the membors of the Expeditionary Forces are in the nature of payment of salary, and aro exempt from stamp duty under the Stamp Act, 1308. I cannot understand your being required to stamp recoipt, ■ and will inquire from the department as to why the demand was made,"

The nrrivnla in New Zealand from oversea durinrr October totalled 3,205, as compared with 3,863 in October, 1913. The departures numbered 1,240, as against 1,860 in October of last year. In tho Supremo Court at Auckland yesterday a verdict for defendant was given in tho case in which Alfred Cuthberi Story, medical practitioner, formerly of Karatonga, sued William Henry Crovo, island trader, Auckland, for £SOO damages for alleged wrongful arrest. Food prices wore discuwed by the Labor Representation Committee at their meeting last evening, and the following resolution was carried:—"That this committee, in view of tho alarming Press reports that only soma few daye" supply of flour is in hand in the Dominion, enter their emphatic protest against the apathetic attitude adopted by tho Government, and at once call on them to assume the responsibility of protecting the people from the rapacity ot the holders of foodstuffs; and, further, call tho attention of the public to tho full powers conferred on the Government by the Regulation of Trado and Commerce Act, passed on August 10, to seize wheat, flour, or other foodstuffs for any purposo, including 'sale to the public.'"

We hear that Whitcombe and Tombs have purchased tlie freehold of the property from the Excelsior Hotel right down to the premises of Messrs Ferguson and Mitchell. It is the intention of the new proprietors to start early in the year the erection of a three-story building, "a beginning being mado at the northern end.

It was unfortunate that rain should have fallen yesterday for the People's Day at the Show, but the society were lucky compared with last year, when it rained heavily from early morning. The takings for the two days this year amounted to i £4lO, or about £l5O more than what was ; taken last year. This is very satisfactory when it is remembered that the mem- , bership of the society has increased, and ' that this year over 2,000 ladies' tickets 1 wero issued to members, entitling admis- ! sion to both the ground and stand. On ' the whole, the display of stock this year j was better than 12 months ago. It was 1 about the best show of sheep ever seen horo. The results of the woolclassing competitions open to students of classes held under the direction of the Education i Board will bo known on Monday

The special jury case Waters, Ritchie, and Co. v. Shief and Co. set down for hearing by the Supremo Court on December 10 will not come on till the following day, the 10th being election day. At the monthly meetnig of the- Moray Place School Committee Mv Andrew M'Giil occupied the chair, and all the members of committee were present. It was decided to distribute the usual number of prizes nfc the break-up in December this yoav. Mr A. M'Ckary was appointed a member of tho committee to fill a vacancy caused by a member removing from the district. The head master reported that there were now 348 pupils on the roll, and that this attendance was keeping up very well. Through the assistance of a number of citizens the bamd boye have got into uniform, and are making good progress under Bandmaster Lake. The Visiting Committee reported having visited tho school and found the work going on satisfactorily. Messrs Swan and Gregg were appointed a visiting committee for the month. As tha echool is required for a polling booth on election day, it was resolved to give the children a holiday on that date. The Duncdin Athenaeum Committee wrote offering a prize of a member's ticket for general knowledge in history and literature.

Tho cable car which left M.ornington shorllv before 8 o'clock this morning came to grief near Maitland street owing to ono of tho front wheels breaking. The traffic was interrupted for eomo time until the car was lifted off the line, unci business people had to walk to the City. The annual meeting of delegates of the various collio clubs was held in Duncdin on Wednesday evening. It was resolved—- " That tho prizes for the championships be awarded on the samo percentage as last year; that an association be formed of the present affiliated clubs, with power to add to their number, an endeavor be made to include all South Island clubs, with a view to a South Island association ; that ! the annual subscription from affiliated I clubs towards the championship funds be i £2 2s; that a committee of three from j affiliated clubs be set up as trustees for the championship fund, and the money be lodged in the P.O. Savings Bank in their name, the trustees t-o be Messrs Purdue. Watt, and Scott; that £3 be paid out of tho fund of the Taieri Club towards remuneration of their secretary for extm work incurred; that all entries for tho championship evonts be in three days aho:;*! of d;;te of trials; that the annual meeting of delegates he held during the championship trials at the place where the trial; are being held ; and that Mr J. P. Walls be appointed secretary to the meetings of delegates." The ballot for the next championship trials resulted in StrathTaicri being allotted them. A memorial service, to tho late Surgconlirutenant Ernest Webb will be held in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church on Sunday, 23th November, at 6.30 p.m. The executive of the Otajro University Students' Association would like as many f-tudents as possible to attend the service to honor the memory of their iate comrade. Seats will bo reserved for students. "Have ono with me." "Thanks, T wi".. ITi hare Watson's No. 30, please."—[Adv;.] A glass of Speight's beer at lunch and supper is better than rill the tea in China.— [Advt.] The Railway Department advises that on av.d after December 1 the train leaving Dunodin for Oamaru at 3.13 p.m. will stop at Port Chalmers when required to pick up or set down passengers. Watson's No. 10 is a little dearer tin a most whi£kies, but is worth the money.— [Advt.J Rheumatic patients should take Broadway's Rheumatic Cure, price 3s 6d: gives immediate relief. Wilkinson and Son, pi-e----scri;it ion chemists.—[Advt.] Mrs Don will give a special address o-.i ' No-license and Prohibition' at the Central Mission service, 6.50 p.m., on Sunday nest.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1914., Evening Star, Issue 15661, 27 November 1914

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The Evening Star FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1914. Evening Star, Issue 15661, 27 November 1914

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