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THE LATE LORD ROBERTS

EULOGIES IX PARLIAMENT. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) LONDON, November 18. In the House of Lords Lord Curzon fair] that' Lord Roberts as a general never knew defeat, and more than once retrieved the trembling fortunes of armies. He conducted great operations with amazing rapidity and astonishing success. He was not merely a commander of troops, but their comrade. In the House of Commons Mr Asquith said that Lord Roberts was crowned with honors, distinctions, and every title. Ho I could have enjoyed the remainder of his life in well-earned and glorious repose, but while in conversation with him (Mr Asquith) a fortnight ago Lord Roberts said j he was anxious to be useful in any capacity. His death came where he (Mr Asquith) believed he would have chosen to die. IMPRESSIVE. SCENES. LONDON, November 18. There were impressive scenes nt Bon logne when the remains of Lord Roberts were embarked. Thousands of British and French troops lined the square near tho station, and many Judges and civil officials witnessed the removal of the body to the steamer. THE FUNERAL PROCESSION THROUGH LONDON STREETS, CHARING- CROs"s~TO ST. PAUL'S. ONE OF THE GREATEST SCENES IN HISTORY. Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright. LONDON, November 19. (Received November 20, at 11.45 a.m.) The funeral of Lord Roberts ranks .among the greatest spectacles in the national history. It was a cold, gloomy day, with showers of sleet. A salute, of 19 guns announced the departure from Charin.-.r Cross station. The Guards and other regulars, also Territorials and colonial troops, lined the route of tho procession through the Strand, Fleet street, and up Ludgate Hill to the cathedral. There were pipers and the Scots Guards' Band, also horse and footguards, an Indian mounted battery, horse artillery, the London Scottish, and King Edward's Horse. The coffin was enveloped in the Union Jack, and was surmounted oy Lord Roberts'? sword and baton. His charger followed. The many generals present bore Lord Roberts's medals and insignia. FIELD-MARSHALS, ADMIRALS. AND GENERALS AS PALL-BEARERS. A REPRESENTATIVE CONGREGATION. LONDON, November 19. (Received November 20, at 1.10 p.m.) Next came the pall-bearers—namely, Field-marshal Lord Kitchener, Sir Evelyn Wood. Lord Orenfel), Lord Methuen, and Lord Nicholson; Admirals Seymour and Lord C. Beresford; Generals Sir James Hills-Johnes, Biddulph, Hunter, Gaseloe, and Egerton. The route was from Northumberland avenue along the Embankment, New Bridge street, and Ludgate Hiil. It was thronged with enormous crowds. Many old soldiers who had served under Lord Roberts were provided with reserved spaces in the cathedral, which was packed. Tho King occupied a special stall near the catafalque. The congregation included Mr Asquith, Lord Lansdownc. Lord Crewe, Mr Bonar Law, Mr A. Chamberlain, Lord Beauohamp, Mr Balfour, many peers and M.P.s, the High Commissioners and Acnts-General, and seVeral Indian princes. WITHIN THE CATHEDRAL. MANY OLD COMRADES, BUT FEW DRY EYES. THE " LAST POST" FROM THE DOME, LONDON, November 19. (Received November 20, at 12.50 p.m.) Many officers who had served under Lord Robert* were present. All those still on active work wore khaki, and thosci who have retired their full dress uniform. One veteran wore, the infantry uniform of the time of the Indian Mutiny. Dr Inge (the Dean of St. PaulV) conducted the s-orvice, the Bishop of London read the Collects, and tho. Archbishop of Canterbury gave the blessing. It was a most impressive service, and them were but few dry eyes ax the Royal Artillery Band played ' Chopin's Dead March. Trumpeters sounded the l.nex Post from the gallery in the: dome. After the ceremony the body was hrouirht to the front of the chancel and the public passed by the catafalque, which was tho same as that used at, the Duke of Wellington's funeral in 1852. Sentries t-tood at the corners leaning on reversed arms. j

Do'pito the. wind and rain, thonsain<ls waited in tlie, oueue for hours, and then filed by through tho t*vo doors into the cathedral.

Those present included many soldiers and wounded Belgians.

At last night's quarterly meeting of the School Committees' Association Mr Wilkinson moved—-"That this meeting, having leai-nt with the deepest regret 01" the passing away of that noble patriot and brilliant soldier Lord Roberts, desire to express their sincere appreciation of his sterling character, his strong sense of justice. and the conspicuous services he rendered the Empire in many a critical period of its history, and trust that his fine example of genuine patriotism maintained right to the close of his long and useful life will have an inspiring effect and lasting influence on the youth of tho nation." This was s CC . onded by the president (Mr J!. Benthamj and carried in ;ilence, all members standing-

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141120.2.56

Bibliographic details

THE LATE LORD ROBERTS, Evening Star, Issue 15655, 20 November 1914

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779

THE LATE LORD ROBERTS Evening Star, Issue 15655, 20 November 1914

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