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THE ELECTIONS

MEETINGS THIS EVENING,

, Mr G. M. Thomson (Dorolin North), ftt Opoho Chttcch Halrr Mr J. M, Jiixon (Qhalnwra), at Moa« giel Coronation Hall.

MR T. H. DALTON

STORMY MEETING AT SOUTH

DUNEDIN.

HOSTILE VOTE CARRIED.

South Dunedin takes its politics like Ha, only seriously, but strenuously—and Mr T. H. Dalton, who faced » hum crowd in South Dunedin Town Hall last night, was submitted to a good deal of interruption and banter, and although the Prune Minister was himself present in explicit chaperonage of the candidate a* one tor the Government, the audience, by a majority of at least 4-1, passed the following resolution (moved by Mr Gore and seconded by Mr Perry);—" That this meeting thank Mr Dalton for his address, but refuse to accept him as the nominee of the Massey party." Bis Worship the Mayor of Dunedin (Mr J. B. Shaddock), who presided, in introducing Mr Dalton, said it was the candidate's first appearance on the political platform, and he hoped that the audience would endeavor to help him, and in doing so they would be helping him (the speaker) as chairman. He was aware that there were some present who did not belong to the electorate, and he asked them to follow the example set by the South Dunedin people. (Hear, hear.) Mr Dalton. who was loudly applauded on commencing to speak, said* he was gratified to see such a large audience. He recognised that the presence of the Prime Minister on the platform had attracted a larger number than would otherwise have been present He felt sure that he would be given a fair hearing. He was a worker himself, and ho knew workers to be good, true, honest fellows, and he was sure that when they had beard his address they would agree with a great many planks on his platform. The speaker then made sympathetic reference to the death of Lord Roberts, and ho felt that the unfortunate war had robbed the election of a great deal of enthusiasm and spirit. He said soma doubt had been expressed as to hi* ability to win the seat, but he was out to win.

A Voice: You have got a big heart. Ho thought that the presence of tho Prime Minister on the platform was a complete answer to those who aaid he was not the chosen of the party. He was out to wrest the seat from the "present member (Mr Sidey). (Uproar, and a voice : '• You will have to go back to work.") Since the present Government took office they had had a very trying time. A Voice: We have all had a trying time. (Roars of laughter and applause.) 'When the Government took office strikes were in progress at Waihi and Reefton, and later on the Government had to contend with the smallpox epidemic, and on the top of it came tho present war. He thought the Government had done wonderfully well since they had been in office. (Hear,'hear, and great uproar.) As a working man he felt satisfied that the Government had done well for the workers. (A Voice: "No. no," and renewed nproar.) The Chairman then made an appeal for order.

The. candidate, continuing, said: " I don't think you are treating me at all badly, chaps.' (A Voice : " Are we downhearted?" and loud answering cries of "No.")

The candidate said he was a party man. Some years ago he thought of standing for Parliament. At that time it was his intention to come out as an Independent, but he had since come to the conclusion that there was no place in Parliament for Independents. (Hear, hear, and applause.) Some of them had been all the time on a rail.

A Voice: Like Clark. (Laughter.) The Speaker: "Never mind Mr Clark." Continuing, he said that if ho was returned to Parliament—(A Voice : "No chance."—he would support the party at present in power, which, he was satisfied, was going back stronger than ever.—(Cries of " No," " Rot," and cheers and countercheers.)

The Speaker: "They will go back sure enough." Continuing, ho said he stood for principle. (Cries of " Oh! oh!") He would sooner a thousand times be defeated than give up his principles.

A Voice: You will be defeated sure enough. Mr Dalton: "As a worker, I was not born with a silver spoon in my mouth."— (A Voice: "A shovel.")—( Roars of laughter.) —He had been a worker all his life, and cordd lay claim to havinjj •been as hard a worker as anyone in the building. He thought, therefore, that the workers would respect hia opinions, and realise his sincerity. As far as the present fight in South Dnnedin was concerned it would not be bitter.

A Voice: It is all one Sidey. (Laugh ter.)

The speaker said Mr Sidey was a man he respected—he was an honorable man. He (the speaker) did not say that the Massey Government wa-3 perfect. (Hear, hear.) Thoy had done thinjrs which ho did not approve of. A Voice: A great many. On the other hand there were many acts »f theirs which he heartily approved of. For instance, the rate of interest on money had been lowered- to 4£ per cent. A Voice t It's. German monev.

He saw no reason why he should not win public confidence and j?et a seat in Parliament. He had filled a number of public positions. He had lived in Dunedin for 15 years, had been chairman of the Macandrew Road and Kensington School Committees, and president of the Ctiy and Suburban School Committees' Associations. He had also been connected with other bodies. At present he was president of the Sick and Benefit Club at Messrs R«id and Gray**. A Voice: That will get you a seat in Parliament.

Regarding the question of finance, "a ■man named Russell" had said that the Massey Government went in on a pood -wicket. He did not think the wicket, was a good one to bat on. When the Government took office on July 10, 1912, the finances were in an unsatisfactory condition. The balance at tho audit of the Consolidated Fund on March 31, 1912, which stood at £807,276, had been so tar reduced by June 30 that, aitex- providing for-liabilites, only £242,102 remained. In the Public Works Fund there was a nominal credit of £777,083. but against this there were liabilities of £1,649,349. The State Ooal Mines account was also nominally in credit to the amount of £26,101; but there, also, there were liabilities exceeding this amount by £31,200. A Voice: Ko wonder William (referring to the Prime Minster) is looking serious. (Laughter.) During the last two or three years that the Ward party were in power, said Mr Dal ton, each loan had coat more and more in interest, but during the time the Reform party had been in office the rate of interest had been decreasing. This showed the confidence the London money lender had in the Government of Xow Zealand %y the Reform party. (Applause, and cries of " Confidence in the Dominion.") Jle deprecated the raising of short-dated loans such as had been indulged in by the Waxd and Mackenzie Governments. The four and a-half millidn loan floated by Mr Allen was reproductive, and the speaker quoted figures in support of his contention. He maintained that the Ward government had borrowed £16,496.770 in two years and three months, whereas the Maesey Government had only borrowed £14,636,880 in two and a-half vears. The laat Horplus was £426,905, which could have been considerably swelled had the Government chosen to do so. The Massey Government had, during 1913, paid in £103,000, wocivad £vm land soles, to a, separate account to be used for the purchaes- of estates. The Liberal Government put this money into the Consolidated revenue. The policy of the Massey Government bad been one of sound finance. (Bear, hear, and applause.) Despite lones trmmffh the Customs owing to tho ■fcrfke—{A Voice: And tha cost of special constables.)—tho surplus was satisfactory. (Bear, hear, and applause.) When the

Massey GxxrormuWt came into power they set tip a Public Finance Committee to see that nothing "crooked" was done. Nothing "crooked" would have been dono in any cage. Cries of Oh! oh!) I had always Wen «aey to get information from tho. Massey Government, but that could not be sakt of tho previous party. With regard to the Land Question, he faTOred a man having the right to acquire the freehold. He did not, however, condemn the leasehold, which, ho maintained, should be- usod as a stopping »ton© to th© j acquirement of the fee simple. In reference to land settlement, he had no hesitation in saying that the Reform party had 'an excellent record in this reepect. Duri ing 1913 the Reform party had settled 500,3% acre* of Grown land and 2.051 ! settlers were placed on the land. Next year there would be 79C.0C0 acres of Crown land thrown open for settlement. In 1910-11 the Ward Government purchased and settled 14,399 acres, and in 1911-12 44.04? acres; the Mackenzie Government (101 days in office), 52,000 acres. In 1913, when the Reform party had been a year in oflico. they had purchased 141,062 acre*. This was a record to bo proud of. The Reform party had also achieved a record in the matter of purchasing estates for settlement. —False Criticism.—

Mr ft. W. Russell had criticised tiie Goveriun«nt J s action in regard to big estates, but ho himself had 60,000 acres of freehold in the country. Voice: How much is it worth?

Mr Dalton: "If 1 made that criticism with 60,000 acres of land I would hide my face for shame." The speaker went on to say that a statement had been made some time ago to the effect that the Elderslie No. 2 Estate had been purchased hv the Government for £33.420, while it had been valued at £13,000. It hadbien valued for taxation purposes at £13,000, and yet they tried to make out that there had "been dirty work. 'llia fact was that the citato had been bought in the time of the Liberal Administration, and was paid f-n- bctore the Reform party went into office. The Government had a Rood record with the workers. (Oh! oh!) n six years of office the Ward Government had built--210 workers' houses, while the Massey Government had built 305 in two and a-half jears, and 40 more were being erected. Moreover, the Reform party had extended the workers' homes in another direction—to the country—and in the neig'hl>orhood of tho Smithiield Freezing Works the Government had purchased scmo 60 acres, and were building a number of workers' home?, giving about fivo acres each, and the cost was .something like £6OO, with the laud. This would be paid off in 26 or 26j years at the rate ot at.out 16s 6d a week, and the step was one in the right direction, and of genuine help to those working in th? freezing works. —Labor and Strikes.— He> was a worker himself and in genuine sympathy with the walking class. Workers had nob always been paid the wages they should have been paid. Only a short time ago he was told theie was a. man working in a factory in Dunedin receiving only 30s a week. The man had a wife and seven children, and he hud to work on Saturday afternoon U> keep _ his household going. But he did not believe in strike*. '.lhere were occasions when men were justified in striking, but in general strikes were not good to the. working man. He had sympathy with the man who wanted work and could not get it. H*» knew what it was to look for work, and he pitied the man who wanted work and could not get it. This Government were willing to see that even- man got work, to find work for him. Voice: At 5s 4d and 3s 9d a day on the railway works. Mr Dalton went on to say that it had been said that men wore not properly paid under the contract system. Mr Massey had said that the Government wanted a man to get a good clay's pay for a good day's work. Voice: When Massey took the Treasury on he wanted a good day's pay? The speaker continued that if there were engineers in tho Government employ who sweated the men they were appointed by the Liberal Administration anyhow, and he knew that Mr Massey would see that contracts were let at a price that enabVil tho payment of a pro]>er wage. The speaker concluded by recounting tho increased wages the Massey Government had given to railway men, policemen, pott and telegraph officers, and other Civil servants. The increase to tho latter involved £42,000. ' Towards the end of the candidate'* address he was interrupted by tooting on a motor horn and by the process of counting out, and twice the Mayor intervened and threatened to - clear one corner. —Liquor Qitr.-tion.— Asked as to his opinion on the Liquor Question, Mr Dalton said that he favored a bare majority on this a" on every question. Finally, Mr Angus M'Neil moved—"That this meeting accord a hearty vote of thanks to Mr Dalton for his able, speech, and express confidence in him as a suitable representative in Parliament of the Dunedin South Electorate. ' Then the amendment mentioned above was moved, and carried on a show of hands. Finally, someone called f:>r cheers for Mr Massey. but the hoots predominated. A counter "cheer for Mr Sidey was heartily responded to. MINISTER OF MARINE BEFORE HIS CONSTITUENTS. [Pea Unhid Press Association.] WELLINGTON, November 18. The Hon. F. M. B. Fisher, Minister of Marine and Customs, addressed a crowded meeting in the Town Hall this evening. Long before 8 o'clock, the hour for opening, the building was packed. There was a good deal of cross interjection. On tho whole it was of a good-humored character, and tho Minister met his interrupters with imperturbable urbanity. Mr Fisher, who was loudly cheered, said that the Government were confronted with the question as to whether it was advisable or not to hold the elections this year. They had no precedent in British history for postponing the election, and to-day, while the campaign was proceeding in New Zealand, one was also taking place in Victoria. Had the Government determined to postpone the elections, there would have been a cry raised throughout the length and breadth of tho land that the Massey party were hanging on to office and taking advantage of the war. The Government decided to take what he thought was a perfectly proper course, and, he might say, they were in a winning mood. (Cheers.)" He was satisfied that, when the day of polling came round, the people would determine that the present Administration were tho right one to conduct the policy of tho Dominion. Tho Minister proceeded to review the Government's record since they came into office. Recent events had justified the naval policy of the Reform party. They owed the safety of the shipping of this country, and of Australia, entirely to the statesmanship of those far-seeing Australians who declared that they were going to have their own fleet. (Cheers, and a voice, "Labor did it.") "Yes," retorted the Minister; "it was the Labor party.'' Whilst the Labor party of Australia had shown will and sagacious statesmanship in regard to defence, the little hop-o'-my-thumb party in this country did not believe in defence at all. The Government were anxious to pay their share towards naval defence, but they must have up-to-date instead of obsolete ships, and they wanted to provide men as well as mouey, and pay our men colonial rates of wages. In addition, they wnnted to lay it down definitely that tbeir must be one flag, one fleet, and undivided control. ■ The Minister said he hoped the example of Aus- ' tralia and New Zealand in this respect would be followed by Great Britain, so that the Old Country would never be found as unprepared as it undoubtedly was ! when the European war began. The | Government had reduced borrowing. The ' pledge that the Government had previously given was not that they would cease to sorrow, but that they would expend the borrowed money in a more reproductive manner than their predecessors. (Cheers.) During the. two years that the Massey Government had been in | power they borrowed £14,636,880, while, I during a'"similar period, the Ward-

Mackenzie Governments borrowed £16,496.775. Then the Ward Government raised their money at the rate of £4 12s 6d per cent., while the Massey Government loans were raised at the rate of £4 4s 7d. Referring to the State Fire Insurance Department, the Minister said that, notwithstanding statements to the contrary, he had not bartered. Re was not goipg to barter with any private insurance company in New Zealand. He was going to run the State Fire Insurance in the interests of the whole community, and he was not going to be tied or bound in any way. He quoted figures to show that under the Massey Government the profits of the Public Trust Office had increased, pointing out that the profits in 1909 were £10,850, in 1910 £1,738, in 1911 £11,241, in July, 1912 (when the Massey party came into power), £11,241, in 1913 £27,551, and in 1914 £29,220. The question of the seamen's vote next came under the Minister's review. Mr Fisher said he had always thought, and he still thought, that no man, even though lie was a seaman, had the right to vote unless he had been 12 months in this country. (A voice: "What about the postal vote in Australia?") The Minister retorted that the Australian Labor party had excised tlip postal ballot, for they would have none of it He laid down the law that it was not right for a fireman to come one day, say, from the East of London, vote and go out 24 hours after. He suspended the Shipping and Seamen Act because the seamen refused to man the vessels, and would not re-engage, which meant that unless the Act was suspended the commerce of the country could not be maintained. Should the necessity arise again he warned them Hint he would not hesitate to suspend the Act again. (Cheers.)

Coming to more personal matters, Mr Fisher said that when they saw the tattered remnant of the once great Liberal party driven into an alliance with the " Red Feds." they could understand the predicament in which the I iheral party now found themselves. He put the issue to them plainly. They hed two alternatives. One was tc have the Government returned*lo tower and the other was to have the deposition returned to power, with the Federation of Labor sitting on the safety valve. They could not get any Administration back other than the Reform party unless they were prepared to submit to an. allianco b«tweon the Liberals and the Social Democrats. That, he thought, would be extremely distasteful to the people of New Zealand. In repiv to questions, the Minister declared that no blame rested upon tho Government in legard to the Iluntly disaster iinv mora than blame rested with the LiitTalsforthe wreck of the Penguin. He was not in favor of a referendum on the Bible-in-schoois arid suggested that a conference of the Churches be held with the object of endeavoring to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion. He was for 55 per cent, on both the I.ccal Option and National Prohibition questions, though ho thought Local Option was a failure, and ought to bs wiped out. There was much interruption when a motion of confidence in the Government was proposed, and the chairman did not formally put it. Mr Fisher, however, thanked the audience for passing it unani. nieusly. SIR J. G WARD AT WAIKIYVL Sir Joseph Ward addresed a crowded meeting of about- 600 people at Waikiwi Ir.sr, night, and was accorded an enthnsi-i!i-ih; reception. His speech was on much thi' s;uae lines as those delivered at Winton and Bluff. The chair was occupied by Mr W. A. Morris, a former opponent. At the conclusion the following motion was cniried:—"That this meeting thank Sir Joseph Ward for his able address, express confidence in him as Leader of the Liberal party, congratulate him on the patriotic stand in Parliament by dropping party differences during' the height, of the crisis, and sincorly hope that he will not only be returned as our member once more, bub that as a result of the election he will be once again placed at tho head of the Government.'' THE CAMPAIGN IN OTAGO. Mr W. I). Ma«-on. the Liberal candidate for Chalmers, addressed a iarge meeting oi electors in the Anderson Bay Presbyterian Sunday School last night. Mr Thomas Soinerville presided. A supplied report states that at the conclusion of his speech, which lasted for over an hour and a-half. in the course of which rrecial reference was made to the Omarr.mn run, a hearty v.He of thanks to Mr Ma?on for his able and interesting address and confidence in him as the most suitable man to represent the electorate ii Parliament »vas submitted by Mr H. Kcfis. This was seconded by Mr Jas. Jeffery, and carried unanimously. [Mr Jeffery informs us that he seconded a vote of thanks only, and conversation with the chairman Mr T. Homerville, confirms this. Mr Jeffery says as a matter cf principle he neither moves nor seconds votes of confidence or acts on committees organised to further any candidate's card.] Mr C. R. Smith, (he Liberal candidate for Bruce, addressed the electors at Lawrence on Tuesday evening, there being about 500 present, and was accorded a verv good reception. His speech was niainlv on the lines of the one he deliverd at Milton last Friday eight, special emphasis being laid on the many promises made by the Reform Government, and the absence" of fulfilment. The Prime Minister's square deal, like hi.? Government prowere tmpty and hollow. Mr Smith was unsparing in his condemnation of *.he Government's'l.:>«<". I'olicv and of the way in which the Minister oi Lands had interfered in the subdivision of the Omarama runs, where an attempt was made to play into' the bands of the absentee runholder. Tire candidate was accorded a vote of thanks and confidence, which was carried amid loud applause, with only one dissentient. At Fairfield last evening Mr George S. Thomson, Labor candidate for Chalmers, addressed a fairly full house, and received a very attentive hearing. He contended that 'neither the Massey nor the Ward parties were genuinely sympathetic to Labor. Ho stated that on Monday forenoon at Port Chalmers he had been approached and told that the whole of his electioneering expenses and full payment for the time he had given to the campaign would be paid to him if he would withdraw in favor of W. D. Mason. He told his audience, however, that, he had announced at his Port Chalmers meeting on Monday evening last that he considered the offer a bribe; that he had entered the campaign to go through with it; and that in any case he would not stand aside in favor of one of the most extreme Socialists in New Zealand, who was standing as a Wardite. At the close of the candidate's address he was asked a number of questions, the principal of which was whether he was agreeable to accent nomination as a follower of Sir Joseph Ward. His reply was that to be true to Labor he had" to take up the position that both the Massey and Ward, parties must go in favor of the elective executive, truly representative of tho people. A hearty vote of thanks to Mr Thomson and one to the chairman (Mr South) closed the meeting. Mr Thomson speaks at Mosciel to-morrow (Friday) afternoon (to ladies only) and in the evening. Meetings of Mv .T. W. Munro'c committee will "be held in the ronms, Princes sheet, and of Mr A. Walker's committee in the rooms, George street, to-night. A LIVELY MEETING. [SruciAr. to rai: Star.? TIMARU, November 18. Mr F. H. Smith, the Reform candidate for Timaru, had a pretty lively meeting in the Theatre Royal on Tuesday night. Mr Smith is not a fluent speaker}"and nas not even the merit of arranging his matter in orderly fashion. A large section of tho audience, however, did not mind this, as they proved more than capable of fillinjr in the intervals while Mr Smith was turning from one note to another. The Reform newspapers gum up the situation this morning by saying that "Mr Smith appeared quite satisfied for the greater part of the evening to allow half a dozen persons in the rear seats to divide his performance with him." Interruptions were almost continuous during a great

part of the address, and even after the ejection of one persistent offender by the polioe tho audience kept up the sniping. The candidate's speech followed the familiar party lines, though ho made less use of figures than most of his colleagues make. He declared himself strongly opposed to tho aims of the Bible-in-Schools League, and said he would not have a referendum in any shape or form. On the licensing question he declared for the three-fifths majority, but said he had no objection to the. 55 per cent, majority if three conditions were observed —first, that Local Option was entirely done away with; second, that districts which had carried No-license should be allowed to revert to License on a 55 per cent, majority ; third, that if local Lo-license were carried four years should elapse before the closing of the licensed house*. The candidate made no attempt to reconcile his first and third conditions. A substantial proportion of the two hours and a half occupied by the meeting was devoted to a discussion of the allegation that Mr Smith gave a promse to the Waitaki Temperance Organisation not to vote against a 55 per cent. Bill, and broke it when tho Bill came before the House. Mr Smith put his side of the case at the opening of his speech, emphatically denying the allegation, and declaring that the No-license party had done a mean and contemptible thing in trying to induce a political novico to break his pledge to support the three-fifths majority. Whon question time arrived, Mr George Dash, of Waimate, gave the No-license party's version of the incident, strongly contending that Mr Smith had broken a solemn promise. Mr Smith replied that there were people in the audience who had known him all his life, and could say that his word had never been doubted in Timaru. Mr Dash came forward, but was greeted with uproar, and the Chairman cut him short. .Some of the Labor section heckled tho candidate in regard to the Waihi strike and the Huntly disaster, and his invariable reply was that he thoroughly approved of what the authorities had done. By •the time a vote of thanks was moved the bulk of the audience appeared to have had their fill of entertainment, and when the Mayor rose to put the motion most of the crowd were moving towards the doors. The fate of the motion was not declared. Mr Smith had a tilt at the 'Lyttclton Times' in regard to old age pensions. He said that that newspaper accused Mr Massey of having voted against old age pensions, but the fact was, as .»hown in ' Hans'ird,' that Mr Massey voted every time in favor of the pensions. ' Hansard' (vol. 95. page 260) showed that Mr Massey even supported Mr Bnddo's clause providing pensions for widows of any age. In the face of this the ' Lyttelton" Times' said Mr Massey voted ngainst pensions. A paper that said things like that ought to be hauled over the coals. It was most unjust, and should not be allowed. Mr Smith made, perhaps, the hit of the evening in a referenco to himself. " I am not in love with politics.'" he said, "and I don't think politics is altogether in love with me." This naive confession was .greeted with much laughter. Later in the meeting Mr Smith confided to the audience that before he was asked tr> stand for Timaru he had really wanted to get out of politics. " It won't take long," retorted the inevitable voice, and again the audience roared with laughter. IN THE NORTH. Mr T. M. Wilford. M.P., who Keeks reelection for the Hiitt, opened his campaign at Petone last night. He regretted the necessity for making a political speech in the midst of the war. The elections should have been postponed. New Zealand should have followed the lead of England and other countries, where the Leaders of the Opposition had been taken into the confidence of the Government. The candidate referred to the Local Railways Bill as an iniquitous measure. The Huntly disaster was a preventable accident. He would uphold free, secular, and compulsory education. A vote of thanks and confidence was passed. Mr J. M*' Combs, Labor candidate for Lyttelton, addressed a meeting of electors at Opawa last night. He dealt with the business of the last Parliament, and condemned the Government with referenco to the Huntly disaster* He was accorded a vote of thanks and confidence. Mr T. H. Davey, Independent candidate for Christchur'ch East, gave his first address at 'Sydenham last night. He explained that he was opposed to tho Mackenzie Ministry and became Independent, and he intended to remain so. He would pledge himself to neither party on a Noconfidence motion. At the. cloee of the meeting a motion was passed thanking Mr Davey for his address, and regretting that, after hearing his explanation of his position, the meeting could not see their way to support him at the coming election. THE CANDIDATES. The General Election—which will take, place on Thursday, December 10 —is at last beginning to attract some notice, and judging by tho calibre of candidates who are offering themselves in some of the electorates, keen contests are anticipated. Up to the present it is announced that five of the sitting members will not offer themselves for re-election. These are : Hon. J. A. Millar, who retires from the representation Dunedin W«st; the vetoran Mr John Bollard, who retires from Eden : Mr Thomas Buxton, who will stand down at Temuka; Mr E. H. Clark, who will not seek re-election for Chalmers; and Mr W. 'H. D. Bell, having accepted judicial office at Samoa. not again woo the electors of Wellington Suburbs. Then there is Mr F. H. 'Smith, who is leaving Wait-aki in order to throw down tho gage at Timaru to Mr Jas. Craigie. "G."' i»i-gnifioß Ministerial candidate, "Lih." Liberal. " O." Opposition, "I." Independent, "Lab." Labor, "S.D." Social Democrat, and "P." Prohibitionist. NORTH ISLAND. BAY OF ISLANDS. tVernon Reed G. George- Wilkinson G. tDr Buck 0. MARSDEN. tF. Mander O. E. C. Furdie 0. KAIPARA. Ooate.s G. R. Hoe O. E. T. Field G. WA ITEM ATA. tA. Harris G. 11. C. Tewsley 0. GREY LYNN. fj. Payne Lab. Hon. CL Fowlds Lib. |W. H. Murray G. Murdoch M'Lean G. AUCKLAND CENTRAL. +A. E. Glover 0. M. J. Savage S.D. W. Richardson P. AUCKLAND EAST. tA. M. Mvcra O. A. S. Holmea G. AUCKLAND WEST. +J. H. Bradnev G. C. H. Poole ' O. T. Oreaham 0. PABXELL. tJ. S. Dickson G. ,T. -T. Sullivan O. J. Dempsev G. W. B. Storey Lab. J. C. Gleeson O. MANTJKATT. +Hon. F. W. Lang G. J. W. M'Larin Lib. EDEN. C. J. Pan- G. E. H. Potter O. W. R. Tuck Lab. Wesley Richard* S.D. FRANKLIN. tHon. W F. Massey G. A. G. C. GVws O. RAGLAN. ■m. F. Bollard G. W. D. Thompson O. J. JTurniss „ Lab.

WAIKATO. tJ. A. Young , ... ~, G. A. echoles ... 0. TAUMARUNUI. tC. K. Wilson G. F. W. Shortland G. W. T. Jennings 0. TAURANGA. tHon. W. IJ. Herries G, R. D. Stewart ... ... ... ... ... 0. OHINEMURI. til. Poland Rev. J. Clark .: G. THAMES. tT. W. Rhodes : G. E. H. Taylor O. BAY OF PLENTY. tW, D. S. Mac Donald .„ 0. K. 8. Williams G. GISBORNE. tSir. Jas. Carroll 011. De Lautour G. EGMONT. +C. A. Wilkinson G. D. L. A. Aetbury 0. WAIRARAPA. tSir W. C. Buchanan G. J. T. M. Ilornsby •'• O. WANGANUI. tW. A. Veitch Lab. F. Pirani 0. MASTERTON. tO. R. Sykes 0. A. W. Hosig 0. WAIPAWA. tG. Hunter G. A. E Jull 0. STRATFORD. i,I. B. Hine <'. W. H. Hawkins ... * O. TAHANAKT. +ll. J. Okey •... «• D. J. Hughe.* O. PATEA. tG. V. Peaiw G. W. Ritchie «'• J. Morrison "• OROUA. tG. H. Guthrie G. J. Morrison G RANGITIKET. tE. Newman '«. It. E. Hornblow <>• WAIMARIXO. ' +R. W. Smith O. 11. M. Speed <■>. PAHIATUA. tJ. 11. Escotr G J. D. .Matthews O. PALMERSTOX. +ll. Buick ' G. J. A. Nash G. E. 11. Crabb "• J. Thorn WOI'AKI. t.T. Robertson Lab. W. H. Field G. B. R. Gardner 0. WELLINGTON NORTH. tHon. A. L. Hcrdman G. ]}. Holland S.D. W. H. Turnbull 0. WELLINGTON CENTRAL. tHon. F. M. B. Fisher G. R. Fletcher O. WELLINGTON SOUTH. +A. H. Hindm.irsh. Lab. .7. P. Luke G. WELLINGTON SUBURBS. F. T. Moore Lab. It, A. Wright G. .7. E. Fitzgerald O. A. Aislabie •"• ■•- O. WELLINGTON EAST. tl)r Newman G. D. M'Laren Lab. HUTI'. +T. M. Wilford O. A. M- Samuel G. W. Hobbs I. NAPIER. +J. V. Brown O. G. W. Venables ... G. HAWKE'S BAY. tri. M. Campbell G. Dr M'Nab 0. SOUTH ISLAND. NELSON. +ll. Atmore O. T. A. Field G. W. J. Moffatt I. MOTUEKA. tHon. R, M'Kenzie O. R, P. Hudson G. BULLER. +,7. Colvin O. G M. Powell M. If. Gillcu Lab. GREY. rp. C. Webb -... Lab. H. L. Michel G. .las. Bishop I. E. J. Seantlebury ... .: G. WESTLAND. +T. E. Y. Sodden O. J. A. Murdoch G. WAIRAU. +R. MCallum O. ,1. Duncan G. HURUNUI. +G. Forbrs O. W. A. Banks G. KAIAPOT. tHon. D. Buddo O. D. Jones G. LYTTELTON. +J. M'Combe S.D. M. J. Miller G. ELLESMEIIE. tHon. R. 11. Rhodes G. J. C- Free O. ASHBURTON. tW. Nosworthy G. W. S. Maslin ' <). TEMUKA. C. E. Kerr G. .7. Talbot O. CHRISTCHURCH NORTH. !L. M. T*itt <>■ IT F. Toogood G. .7. E. Pethmick Lib. CHRISTCHURCH SOUTH. +ll. G. Ell 0. G. R. Whiting Lab. F. P.. Hughes G. CHRISTCHURCH EAST. +T. 11. Davey I. 71. Hunter -•• S.D. Dr Thacker O. PvICGARTON. tG. Wittv O. B. Bunn G. AVON. IG. W. Russell O. H. D. Acland G. D. G. Sullivan S.D. SELWYN. +W. J. Dickie O. G. Sheat '/; Joseph Hamlet '-'. TIMARU. +J. Crnigie O. +F. H. Smith G. CHALMERS. \Y. D. Mason O. J. M. Dickson G. G. S. Thomson 1.-Lab. WAITAKL Norton Francis GJohn Anstey 0. BRUCE. tHon. J. Allen G. C. R. Smith °- CENTRAL OTAGO. +R. Scott G. W. A. Bodkin O. WAKATIPU. +Hon. W. Fraser G. Joseph Stevens O. OAMARU. +E. P. Lse J. A. M'Pherson O. CLUTHA. tA. S. Malcolm G. j. E. Jenkinson O. DUNEDIN 2SORTH. tG. M. Thomson ... .- OA. Walker ......... ...©.-La&

DUNEDIN CENTRAL. tC. E. Statham G. J. W. Munro 0.-Lab DUNEDIN WEST. W. Downie Stewart G. J.. T. Johnson O. W. E. J. Maguire vS.D. DUNEDIN SOUTH. +T. K. Sidey • ... ..." ... 0. T. 11. Daltoti ... ; ... G. G. F. Bewley Lab. MATAURA. +O. .1. Anderson (». W. G. MehalTey 0. AWAIIUA. Sir Joseph Ward O. J. R. Hamilton G. IXTKRCABGILL. tJ. A. iL-ninn ..; ... O. ,). F. Lillicrap ; G. WALLACE. +•1. C. Thomson ... : O. A. W. Rodger G. tSat in the 1912-14 Parliament.

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Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS, Evening Star, Issue 15654, 19 November 1914

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5,926

THE ELECTIONS Evening Star, Issue 15654, 19 November 1914

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