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FIERCE ASSAULT ON BRITISH

BRILLIANTLY HURLED BACK.

REPORTED RUSSIAN REVERSE

SETS BERLIN AGLOW. TURKEY INSULTS AMERICA. TOTAL BRITISH NAYAL LOSSES 6,000. Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright.

IN FLANDERS AND ON THE AISNE. MINOR CHANGES TO ALLIES'"ADVANTAGE. PARIS, November 18. (Received November 19, at 8.45 a.m.) A communique states : The German bombardment from the sea to tho Lys is being continued with considerable activity, especially at Nieuport. To tho east and south of Ypres wo repulsed isolated infantry attacks, and the Zouaves, with a brilliant bayonet charge, carried a wood near Bixschoote which had been contested for three days. The British have maintained their front. The bombardment of Rheims is being continued. We regained our western front at Chauvoncourt, despite German counterattacks. We forced the Landwehr battalions to withdraw from Sainte Marie-aux-Mines. The Germans there lost half their effective troops.

DETERMINED ATTACK

ON BRITISH POSITION.

BRILLIANT COUNTER-CHARGE

AT CRITICAL MOMENT.

The High Commissioner reports under date London, 18th November:—

Official: The first division of the British forces was yesterday subjected to a heavy attack, first of artillery and then of infantry, the brunt falling upon two battalions of the first division, who were shelled out of their trenches. They, however, recovered them with a brilliant counterattack, driving tho enemy back in disorder for 500 yds.

In an attack made on a brigade of our second division the enemy were repulsed with hcavv losses.

STRANGE FIGHTING

IN FLOODED TERRAIN.

LONDON, November 18.

(Received November 19, at 8.45 a.m.)

In the flooded area, especially round Dixmudo, Oostkerke, and Kaskerke, there are many German detachments at isolated outposts and farmhouses. Some of them have died of starvation, and the Belgians picked off many others. Seventeen Uhlans were shot in attempting to capture a floating lop.

WARSHIPS HELP AGAIN,

REPARATION PROBABLY Dlv

AND HIT MILITARY TRAIN.

AMSTERDAM, November 18,

(Received November 19, at 8.45 a.m.)

The ' Telegraaf' says the Allies' -warships on Monday bombarded a factory on the canal from Zeebrugge to Bruges, which was used by the enemy for military purposes.

Tho bombardment also demolished a military train, and killed many Germans.

VERDUN FORTRESS

NOT EVEN BESIEGED

(London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Sern'e**.)

LONDON. November 18.

A Parb report says that the so-called siege of Verdun, reported from Berlin, is entirely without foundation. RUSSIAN REVERSE REPORTED IN’ NOP.TTTERN POLAND. GERMANY’S VETERAN GENERAL. AMSTERDAM, November 18. (Received November- 19, at 8.45 a.m.) The Germans claim a great victory for General Hintienburg over tho Russians who were advancing on Thom. The streets of Berlin were decorated, and the Kaiser has congratulated General Hindenburg. DEFENCE OF CRACOW. GERMANS UNDERTAKE IT. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services,) LONDON, November 18. Tho Germans have taken command of the defences of Cracow, and have relegated the Austrians to the Carpathians, causing further dissensions between their allies.

M AND ED.

BLUEJACKETS LANDING,

WASHINGTON, November 18. (Received November 19. at 12.15 p.m.)

JAPAN AND TURKEY.

FORCES COMPARED

THE FORMAL BREACH,

RUSSIA'S NUMERICAL ADVANTAGE.

(London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Services.)

LONDON, November 18

'The Times's' military correspondent estimates that the Germans' three armies and the Austnans' three armies in the eastern theatre total two million men. The Rwssians have seven armies, totalling three and a-half million men.

A WAR LEVY

ON BUKOVINIAN CAPITAL.

rETROGRAD, November 18. (Received November 19, at 11.45 a.m.)

Details of tho recent Russian annexation of Bukovina (in S.E. Galicia) show that the Cossaclcs made a dramatic entry into Czevnowitz (the chief town), accompanied by bands of choristers. General Arintmoff summoned the townsfolk to the steps of the Municipal Palace, and levied on them a flno of 600,000 roubles, in revenue for the amount the Austrian General Daulann had exacted from Kameniez-Podolski (across the Russian frontier), whore General AxintinofFs daughter had been obliged to sacrifice her own jewels General Arintinoff threatened that unless the fine were paid immediately he would train hia big guns and level Czexnowitz to the ground. The populace were terror-stricken. Finally the ArchWahop persuaded the general to accept 200,000 crowns. THE GENERAL RELENTS. PETROGRAD, November 18. (Received November 19, at 12.45 p.m.) For two whole days the City Fathers and priests travelled the countryside begging. The peasants,came to the Town Hall weeping and deposited thair trin-

ROME, November 18.

(Received November 19, at 8L45 a-m.)

WIRELESS IN JAVA

AN INTERNED GERMAN BOAT,

BATAVIA, November 18.

BELGLAN CHILDREN.

AMERICA'S OPEN DOOR,

kots. The Jews sacrificed their ritual candelabra, and the archbishop contributed SO,OCX) crowns’ worth of silver and even the altar furniture. Finally the burgomaster broke into the shops of the goldsmiths, who fled. When the money had been collected General Arintinoff caane to the Town Hall and said : “ City Fathers, you look fagged.” After inspecting the treasure he said: “Take it back; I only wanted you to experience tho heartburning of Kamenioz-Podolski.” THE “LITTLE FATHER.” (Ivondon ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) LOXDOM, November 18. Th© tear has visited the hospitals. He spoke kindly words to the wounded. The Austrian and German wounded in one ward greeted him with a threefold ‘ Hoch !” Passing a column of marching Russians, ho alighted and conversed with them. He ascertained that 85 per cent, of their wounded in the early stages of tho war had returned to the ranks, WINE PROHIBITED AS WELL AS VODKA. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) LONDON, November 18. A message from Petrograd slates that, following on the prohibition of the peasants vodka, a wider regulation prohibits the use of wines by the officers and the wealthy. TROUBLE AT SMYNRA. TURKEY'S WARLIKE ACT AGAINST ui. CRUISER. ATHENS. November 18. (Received November 19, at 8.40 a.m.) Tho United Stales cruiser Tennessee, anchored off Vourla, sent a launch to seek permission to enter Smyrna. TTio forts fired on the launch, which, however, returned safely to tho ship. Tlie commander of the Tennessee then intimated that ho would enter, forcibly, if necessary [The Tennessee is an armored cruiser, carrying four 10:n guns and sixteen 6in guns os her main armament.]

The, State Department ha 6 been informed that tho Turkish forts at Smyrna fired on the American cruiser Tennessee. It is understood th-it the cruiser is fiending bluejackets ashore in order to protect the Consulates,

Mr Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, admitted that fears are entertained for the safety of the American Consulate, but eaid no action would be taken until further information was available. NEW YORK. November 18. (Received November 19, at 12.45 p.m.) Tho Tennessee incident at Smyrna is officially confirmed.

A message from Constantinople states that the Japaneso Ambassador departed on Tuesdav.

ißeceived November 19, at 8.40 a.m.) Commander Lupeke, of the warship (?) Preussen, which is interned in Sabang Bay, and Voltz, the wireless operator, have been arrested on a charge of violating Dutch neutrality. Although the vessel's wireless installation had been dismantled, the authorities discovered secret antenna in an erection in the maet. [The boat mentioned is not the battleship Preussen, but probably an aimed merchantman of that name.]

(London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.)

LONDON, November 18. The Chicago ‘Tribune’ has started a scheme for tiie adoption of Belgian children by American families, or of providing them with homes for three years, after which they may return to Belgium. IN SOUTH AFRICA. rebelliojTdying out. DE WET ADMITS FAILURE, CAPE TOWN, November 18. (Received November 19, at 8.45 a-m.) At Vaurensburg 154 Brandfort rebels, after an interview with Do Web, became convinced of the disastrous consequences of the rebellion, and surrendered. Beyers and Wolmarans, when leading 1,500 rebels westward of Buhontoin, were pursued for 18 miles, losing four killed and 22 wounded, while 100 were taken prisoners. AUSTRALIAN ITEMS. THE PACIFIC ISLANDS TRUST. SYDNEY, November 19. (Received November 19, at 9 a.m.) The newspapers express appreciation of the handsome compliment paid Australia by Japan and Britain in handing over to Australia the administration of the Pacific islands, which, it is .recognised, will also involve heavy responsibility. PNEUMONIA ON TRANSPORTS. MELBOURNE, November 19. (Received November 19, at 9 a.m.) Official: The four members of the Commonwealth First Expeditionary Force who died at sea mefoombed to pnegmontfr

ILLICIT TRADING.

DOES NOT INCLUDE THE GOOD HOPE.

MUST ADD 875 MORE,

ALSO 1,000 INTERNED

LONDON, November 18

(Received November 19, at 10.40 a.m.)

THE WAR LOAN,

MELBOURNE, November 19. (Received November 19, at 10.20 a.m.) The Federal Attorney-General (Mr W. M. Hughes) states that so far the raids by the Commonwealth, authorities have disclosed no evidence of trading with the enemy. THE WHEAT SEIZURE. SYDNEY, November 19. (Received November 19, at 9 a.m.) The seizure of wheat by the Government has considerably affected trade, and several firms have stopped buying, thus causing unemployment to a number of men. The New South Wales parliamentary Opposition consider that the echemo robs the producer for the benefit of the city consumer. THE EMPIRE’S NAVY. THE DEATH ROLL TO DATE. 3,677 OFFICERS AND MEN. 465 WOUNDED AND 6 MISSING. LONDON, November 18. (Received November 19, at 8.45 a.m.) In the House of Commons Mr Churchill announced that the total naval losses to date wore 222 officers and 5.455 men killed, 37 officers and 428 men wounded, and 5 officers and 1 man missing.

The naval casualties first cabled do not include the Good Hope's 875, nor the 1,000 navals from Antwerp who are interned In Holland.

GREAT DEMAND FOR PROSPECTUS

, LONDON, November 18. (Received November 19, at 10.40 a.m.) There is a great public demand for prospectuses o£ the. £350.000,000 war loan, but no rush, as they are obtainable at every hank and money order office. The principal banks have subscribed for £100,000,000 irrespective of the needs of their customers. THE NEW ZEALANDERS. The High Commissioner for New Zealand on September 30 administered the oath to a company of 200 young New Zealand men of an average age of' 23, all picked men—men from Oxford and Cambridge and all the medical schools, artists or actors, and. in great numbers, engineers of ail descriptions. Many were not in England when war broke out, but came homo post-haste from the mines, the railways, and the farms of South Africa or South America, and all eager to get to work before the New Zealand contingents arrive. They are the first men from the Oversea Dominions to form an advance company in England. They are of exceptionally fine physique, averaging sft 10m in height, and have passed tests far more severe than ana usually applied. INGENIOUS SANDY. Many honors may yet come the way of Earl Kitchener, says a goeeip in the ‘ Daily Citizen,’ but doubtless he will trcasuie none more than the great compliment paid him by the soldiers in the Expeditionary Force, who practically to a man have rigorously obeyed hie injunction with regard to the “ courteous and no more ” i treatment of women. There has been, however, one backslider, an amorous Highlander, who, when caught by his company officer embracing a bonnio Belgian girl, suddenly remembered the War Minister’s advice. Immediately all the old Adam that was in Sandy showed itself. Drawing himself to his full height, and frowning until his eyebrows almost touched his chin, he exclaimed to the lassie: “ Ah’.u ruie sne sure that ye mistook me f’r ye fopyther, wha’s bin fechtin’ at Liege. Onyway, dinna ye come kissin’ me again, fr ye’ll be get tin' me in an awfu’ row, besides makin’ a perfec’ scunner (scandal) in ma regiment.” GERMANY AGAINST THE WORLD. Mr Robert Blatchford, who ventured to foretell in the ‘ Clarion | that the Germans would not get into Paris, is still confident that they will bo. hopelessly beaten. “ Germany,” he said recent!, ”is fighting against Prance and the two largest and most powerful Empires in the world. She has against her in other parts of the world the Japanese and tho Beers. She has the hatred of China, and she has the suspicion of Italy. And apart from these material forces, she has the moral disapprobation of Russia, France, America. Britain, Belgium, Portugal, Spain, Japan, China, Italy, Holland, Denmark, Norway, Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. Of course, there is Turkey. But ’f Turkey interferes she will bring down ( upon her Italy, Greece, and Rumania, and , she will march across the Bosphorus with t her tail between her legs. And a good Job, too.” ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE OVERSEAS. Reports received by the authorities of the St. John Ambulance Brigade overseas show that the various divisions throughout this Dominion are continuing quietly and unostentatiously to work for the cause of tho sick and wounded in tho war. All tho nursing divisions have been engaged in preparing clothing and material for Queen Marv's Needlework Guild, which has been established at tho headquarters of the Order of St. John in London, and in addition many divisions have entered enthusiastically into tho task of collecting funds which "are urgently wanted at St. Johns Gate for furthering the work of providing succor for the sick and wounded. During the past few weeks shipments of material have been forwarded by the following nursing divisions, viz. i Auckland, Moirinsvilfo, Hamilton, Christchurch, Sehvyn, Kaiapoi, Greymoutn, Hokitika, and Dun edin, and in addition the following nursing divisions have consignments almost ready for despatch Onehunga, Thames, Wellington, Wellington South, Wanganui, Palmerston North, Masterton, Napier, Tlmaru, Westport, Caversham, Green Island, Oamaru, and Invercargill. Other i divisions will also follow. The following | list of remittances show that many of the i units Have been extremely active in this . direction: —Auckland Corps, £5; Auckland Ambulance Division, £5; Auckland Nursing Division, £sj Morrinsvillo Nursing Division, £l2 12s; Christchurch Nursing Division, £24 9s ; Solwyn Nursing Division (Christchurch), £22 17s M j Ashburton Nursing Division, £6 17s lid ; Oamaru Ambulance Division (collected by friends in the Kurow district), £2B 11s 6d j Hampden Nursing Division, £l6 0s 9d; Palmerston South Ambulance Division, £7 10s; Palmerston South Nursing Division, £7 10s j Dunedin Nursing Division, £24 10s 6d. BS2 MEN FROM ONE FIRM. The members of the staff and works of the British Thomson-Houaton Company, electrical engineers and manufacturers, Rugby, with branch works at Willesden and Coventry, are answering the call for men in a whole-hearted manner. Up to the present 852 have enlisted. It is the company’s intention to pay half-wages to those of its employees who have enlisted, and, wherever possible, to reinstate returning employees in their former positions on the cessation of hostilities. In those positions where fresh help has to be employed to keep the works going no male candidates will be considered who are not over 35 years of ago or who cannot give proof that they are medically unfit to enlist. Lord Kitchener has sent through Major-general Rawlinson - a letter to the managing director, expressing his appreciation of the company’s attitude.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141119.2.61

Bibliographic details

FIERCE ASSAULT ON BRITISH, Evening Star, Issue 15654, 19 November 1914

Word Count
2,442

FIERCE ASSAULT ON BRITISH Evening Star, Issue 15654, 19 November 1914

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