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AN INNOCENT JUDAS.

[By Charles Proctor.] (Continued from Saturday's Issue.) CHAPTFK XX. TUB MJIKTINO. Marion -lanced up from bar book at her ooiiin Bernard, wk> was -whistling and abstract edlv drumming his knuckles on the window of the drawing room. • I am trying to read." she remarked, reproachful! v. "Eh?" Bernard wheeled round, quickly. "Sorry," he added, as he realised' tliat he hail lien rebuked. " Didn't menu to di* u-tH you. Inteve&fc>ng book?" "Very." Marion replied, and resumed her readirg. "1 *av, von're a regular glutton for siding—what':" said Bernard, after u few moments of silence " Can't be bothered with h.oks myrolf Won't you come out for a walk in' the pirk? Do you a u..rld of nood." •'No., thank vou. I was. out this mornbig. and T feci a little tired." answer*! Marlon. coiicealir.-.' her impatience, llaven'r vou nnytrnig m do 'his wfttrri:«int" They were alone in th* drawing room of the Cedar.-. Caj.tain and Mrs .Mostyn having none to town immediately after lunch to'pay a call, and Marion had looked fi>.-ward to,i restful afternoon. "No. notiiiiig doing to-day." I'.t-rnnrd said, moving restlessly about the room. "Don't know what to'do with myself, as a n'atter of fact." " T»o you ever do any woik':'* iuquii-ed Mi.rion. "turning .her hook faw downwards mid looking up at him. "" f— er-—mean. ; invc. voir no profession?" ■•What!" Rernard looked a little startled. "Meant to go in for the army," he explained, after a pause, hut got nioughed at Sandhurst. Uolteu sort of exams, you know. Might have- tried again, hut the old man—the pater. I mean—wouldn't run to it. Then I had a <diot at the Civil Service—nearly went off my head • ■ramming—bub somehow I didn't get 'he hang of~the bally hnsiness. and couldn't pjiss So I got sick .if the whole thing." He paused ai;ain : then, evidently feeling that he had not given a very sat-is-fi.cfory account of himself, he continued : • What I should like to do is to travel —see the world, yen know, and ge.t some sort of appointment in the colonies. Need* a loc of influence, though, to get jobs like .hj it. I suppose I'll settle down to something sooner or later; go into Parliament oi— ct —something." "So you don't do anything at pre.-ent?" Marion asked. • Well. yes. to tell -lTie> tiuth, sometimes 1 sell motor cars." Bernard answered. "Sot ia n ?hop. vou know," he a<l<3«t. hastily. "1 Tecommer.d a car to any chap "that's after one—boo = t it up. don't vou know—nnrl then, if he, buys it. they pay me a 'jind of profession, and a iniin iau make .oiite a lot of money." "Indeed! Have you sold many motor "•mis this season?" "Well, not very many. People don't buy ar« often, you know. I've sold one. and I've spoken to one or two other fellahs. Might do 6ome inure business soon. I'm very keen about :t. really. Wanted ths jieople to give me a car as a kind of sample, but the silly asses wouldn't—didn't see that- it- would mean a. lot of In-siness for them. Awfully unenterprising sonii- people aie. Wanted me to take i hook and "a photograph of the car to -how my friends, an if I was a bally coniii eicial traveller! Made m> quite angry."' " Really!" commenttd Marion, and took til. her book again. " 1 say. Marion t" exclaimed Bernard. •* Wont' you come out?" " -Vo. [ would much rather uot. 1 want to read," said Marion. "Why not uo for a walk alone? You might happen to meet someone who 'va.nts- a motor for Christ-mas." Bernard considered the proposition for » few moments, then groped for his monocle and fixed it in his eye. ■' P'r'aps you're right, but I'd rather go for a walk with yon." he said, at lengtlu " I say, vou're not cros-; with me, are you, Marion !*' " Why. of course uot. Why should I lie?" exclaimed Marion, in some surprise. '■ I'm awfully glad !" Bernard responded, fervently, flushing uncomfortably. "We f—er—we are going to be pah, aren't " 1 hope we shall be good friends," Marion returned, wondering if she would ■cer manage to get. rid of him. "'Right-o!" ejaculated Bernard, seeinngly highly plea~t:d. " See you later, Marion." Marion breathed a -igh of relief when :he door closed behind him, settled herself more comfortably in her chair, and took tip her book once more. For half an hour sin- was left- undisturbed, and site was engrossed in her cading when the maid tapped at the door ind entered. " A gentleman to sec you," announced he girl, holding our a .miiill silver on ;'hieh lay a visiting card. "A gentleman to see rue?" exclaimed .Marion, lookingupinsurpri.se. "Who -" She had taken the card from the tray a-, she spoke, and her voice stopped suddenly, and her heart, too. seemed sudlenly to cease to beat, and the blood drained out of her face as she read the name inscribed : "Mr Ttaeburn S. Chostcitoii."'

For the space of perhaps leu ,iH.onds Marion sat staring at the visiting card; then >sho became aware of the fact that the servant was regaidinig lier curiously. "Show Mr Chesterton in. please." "sinsaid, quickly, and rose hastily from her chair, drawing in her breath diarplv and inwardly praying for strength. l'aeburn entered th<» room quickly, and die observed instantly, despite her own imitation, that his face was very white, and the hand that held his liat was trembling. For u few moments there was dlence, each staring at Iho other, and neither offered to shake fiand-. Then Kaebum spoke. " Mark«Sanip.s.>ii pave me your he .-.aid, and his voice sounded stilted and formal. " I trust yon will not regard my vidt a= an intrusion."

Had he spoken her name, had he begun >•> asking for forgiveness, Marion would have broken down. But thecnlil, formal words seemed to free/n her heart

"Won't aou dl down?" she =aid, and Wii- glad that her voice sounded calm.

" Pray dnn't apologise." "Thank you." Raeburn seated him.-elf. cleared his throat, turned hi* hat round between his hands. and continued, quickly t ''l .saw Mark last night, and—and was forced to explain to him what happened—l mean, that—that th*>re had been something between in." Nobody, listening to the halting, nervous speech, would have imagined that. Raeburn Chesterton was a brilliant orator. "'lndeed?" Marion'* voict< was .still steady. "' Yes—er—riamp.son seemed to think •hat I had been—been unjust: that you .veiv suffering unjustly, and he made uie promise to call. No, that isn't exactly what I mean. I wanted to toi you, and ■*ent to him to ask for your address, and when we discussed the matter "

•I fear I don't quite understand/' interposed Marion, her pride touched by the blundering words. "Am Ito understand that you discussad me with Mr Sampson, and are here at his suggestion? - ' "In a way—ye.s, although I intended to ;di in any case." Baeburn had recovered from his attack of nerves now. and spoke with more confidence. " I will be perfectly frank with you. You know I have "changed my party, and possibly you tan wirmiso vrny 1 was compelled to do so!" "I read the report of one of your speeches in which you explained the» reasons far going over to the opposite side: bub how does this concern mef' responded Marion. " Because vou know that the betrayal of nty secret—the 'Dailr Record' scoop—waa the real reason, and by revealing; that fact yon have it in your power to rum me and drive- me out of political life. It »•«.« because I suddenly realised that that I wanted to ae* yon in the firet place."

"Do you mean that you thought it possible that I should reveal that?" asked Marion, feeling as if she had beeu stmck with a whip. Raeburn hesitated, daiting a quick glance at her. But Marion's whit© face revealed nothing of tho inward turmoil of emotion; did not warn him that already, bv his curt, business-like explanation, and his implied fear that she might betray Iris secret, he had wounded her deeply—nay, more than that, had turned the knife m tho old wound. "I—no, I did not think so; hut 1 deemed it advisable to »>ee you, to reassure myself on the point. I may take it, then, that you have, not the slightest intention ever to reveal the true story of the ' Daily Record' scoop and my resignation?"

For a moment Marion felt as it she were being strangled ; something seemed to have g her throat, and she had a wild i> : to scream—to cry out—but efoe conquered the hysterical impulse, and drew a loiy. shuddering breath. "You may." she eaid, and recognised the voice as her own. ".Not even ' thitty piece* of ailver ' would induce nw» to reveal the secret."

She rose a» if to dismiss him as she spoke, but llaoburu .sat still, his face flushed now, and his big hands opening and closing nervously. "Thank you." he eaid. "I can't understand why "you took the ' pieces of silver' in the first instaaiew. Did you need money, or was it with.the intention of temporarily wrecking my career and compelling me to go over to the other side—to your side? 1 want, the truth, want to know why you did it. Was it all planned, or did you net merely upon » momentary Jmpulso without pausing to consider the consequences? 1 insist on knowing." His tone was masterful and his expression stern a* he looked up at Miiriou, who was standing very still and rigid. Moet women love a masterful man, provided always that he is masterful at the right time: and Ttaebum Chosteiton had cliosen the very worst time. His tone and hcarjrg slung' Marion to .Midden resentment : her eyes kindled, and a Hush leaj»t into her pale cheek*. "You insist!" 6he exclaimed, haughtily. '• You forget yourself. Mr Chesterton." "Ye?, f do* insist,"' said Raeburn. vehemently. "I have a right to know, and 1 demand the truth."

He rose from his chair as he *.poke. and faced her. breathing quickly. •' You know fidl well what the betrayal of the secret meant to mo," he continued, quickly. "You know that T was forced to resign", that my carter to the party to which I wp.<= c.tU'ched was prematurcly brought to a close. You know that I was compelled, in Jin own interests, to go over to the Opposition, and that 1 have had to tight against ridicule and suspicion. All this Vou know—or should know. You are iespo"nsiblo.'and 1 want tolcnow now whether vou did it in order to force me to abandon' my party or for some other reason."

-*I (IttlT your jij,-hr i,> Marion passiom-iirly jetorled. "You refused to jive mo a chance to explain -when [ wished'to <lo so; you refused even to listen to m*\ and when I begged your foieiveness you replied with a bitter. .-conift'l u'ibe. Why .should i oxylaiu

r.mr.' '• 1 wan* the truth." said Raeburu. clog, gedly. "I have been accused twice of treating vou badly ; have been told that I have"broken votir heart : and 1 want to get .'it ih<- tmth of the matter. My career —mv political career—depend*- — " '• \Vhat Li votir carcw to mo': " rlaslied cut .Marion, scornfully. "1 came between vo« and vour ifliwr. you said, therefore 'vou cast 'we aside, reviled arid insulted me. You wart the truth, you say. "Well. T<»u shall have it! You are only here because vou feared that T might mtertere «<'ain " with your eareor. because you dreaded that '['might reveal to the world vhat I know: that HMiurn Chesterton vaht-es nothing on earth hut. public favor and power." . '•That isn't tine." Kaeburn interposed, hastily; " not wholly true. Mark Sampson cuggeaisd " . . "Oh. have yon no shame?" cried .Marion, interrupting. '" You dare to tell me that vou diseueied me with Mark Sampson. ami cam* at his suggestion!" - If I have been unjust [ want to make aisKmdn." protected Harbin n. j-till blundering s>;id)v. '•'l am "lad to- know that you have some «hreds of conscience, left!" said Marion, bittcrlv. "A man who admit* c-hamjing his party solely for the sake of peace :ni(l |>owpr," who voices sentiment* in which he has r.o belief, who a*+s and lives a. lie for the t-izke of his career, and luthlesslv tramples dowi> anything that cornea between Viim and his ambition, does not apped to r:e a* capable of admitting thai lie has been nnju6t." TTneburn'* fac-e. was white as a corpse, now. He had winced under th* lash of Marion's irony, and hi* eye? blazed with ■"' You forget that, vou are to blame." he rasped out. -You played a .Judas trick on :ne. " . "That is fal*-:"' u'led Marion. I played no trick on vou. 1 was innocent of anv intent to injure yon. Kvcn if 1 had been guiltv, /Iws that justify you m pluyin.' a Judn* trick mi the country : _ " r -I loved yo-i—l ftill love you.' «ud n-r'bnrn. gaep'mglv. •That wns why " He stopped, at a, loss for words, and Marion stared at him in a siurtk-d fashion. Ifrd he known it. he had for a moment touched the ritjht note, and said what he .-hculd liave said at iii.st. Cut the next moment, he blundered again. "You spoiled my c-aiecv." hj- resumed: '•but if only you will explain, tell me the whole tiittli. perhaps -" " Perhaps vii". will condescend to iWyive me?" interposed Mai ion. .satirically. "You loved me. you say? But you did not trust me. (•••ndemncd me unheard, and <nred less for me ihr.it your t-areor. Pray 4, |M,f think of allowing me in any way to interfere with your caiecr again'" Kachr.in slated at her in si lon.-e for a full minute; then he turned away abrupt!v and picked up his bat ami glows. Hi* fac was flushed a train, and he looked fuiioitt-. •• F was right'." in? .snapped «.ut. 'You never cared fir me Voti are entirely hi'nrtk'is." He strode out of the n«m, banking the ilo;ir behind him. and Marion laughed mteevly, took a iter- forward, halted, then suddenly aarrk to the floor with a little moaning cry. fllAPTlvn XXI. A rKOC(»AT. AND AN KNU AIiKMKST. "S> you have had a visitor, Marlon?" it-marked Mrs Mostyn, when she and the Captain returned later in the afternoon. Marion nodded and forced a smile. Site had tried to remove all traces of tears, but. hrr aunt was quick to notice that her fac;i was white- anil h-r cheerfulness obvkxisly assumed "Yes. a--an old friend—Mr Ch«rterurn." .Marion r«-.-.p»r•!«'. "Mr Sampson, :t appears gave him my address, and lio caJled." "Mr Chesterton? \'"t Mr tliestorvon, the member -jf Parliament. 1 suppose?" "Yes. He used to ba a friend of my father, ami I met him again when I w«tr> with. Mm Arnold Power." "Indeed?" .Mrs Mostyn looked curious, but Marion changed the" subject almost abruptly. " Vou are not looking well, my dear," her atmt remarked, suddenly. " lias anything upset you? Mr Chesterton didn't bring you any bad news, I hope?" The tell-tale scarlet flooded Marion's face, hv.t she was determined not- to satisfy her aunt'ci curiosity, or even hint at what was distressing her. " Why, what bad news could Mr Chesterton bring, aunt?" .she responded, carelessly. "Mr Chesterton talked about himself—as he usually does.'' "But, my dear. you—er —wu look ae if you "had "been crying!*' "I feel a little wretched and out of sorts," repliod Marion. " Don't worry about me, aunt." "I can't help worrying about you, Marion, dear," naid Mra Mostyn, quickly. "I do so want you to be comfortable and happy, now and in the future, and 1 should hate to think anything of anyone was making you miserable You are. qiute sure that I dj2 fifithing <*> M&Jt? 11 * de^r ?'-!'v

"Quite sure, aunt," answered Marion. " You axe very kind, and really T am most comfortable. It is foolish, of me to lie miserable." Mrs Mostyn was silent for a few moment*; then*she. smiled and patted Marion encouragingly on the shoulder. "1 suppose we nil feel a littl* bit 'dumpy' now and then, dear," she said. " 1 must tell Bernard to try to cheer you up." Morton forced a smile, but rusde no response, and her «unt patted her shoulder again and bustled out of the room. Once she had closed the door behind her, Mi* Mostyn's smile vanished, to bo replaced by a frown of annoyanoo and vexation. " She's keeping something back." she whispered, as she went in search of her husband. "There must he. something between her and Kaebiirn Chesterton." " Nonsense, my dear, nonsense.'" said Captain Mostyn." when she had related her tuapiekms! "Why should you jump to the conclusion that because the girl looka as if she had been crying there mus*, be sown understanding between her and Chesterton ?" "Why should he conic hero if there was nothing (between them?" snapped Mrs Mostyn. "Do yon think a celebrity like Racb'urn Chesterton lias nothing better to do thau to waste his time in calling on acquaintances in the suburbs?"' "Pooh! Do you think a man in Chesterton's position would want to marry a penniless nobody 1 t suppose he called out of sheer .good nature —happened to -be in tht> neighborhood or something of the sort. No need to fly into u panic, my dear."

Bernard Mo.dyn strolled into the room while they were still arguing, and was immediately (bombarded with questions. " I thought so!'" exclaimed Mrs Mostyn, with a sort of despairing (satisfaction, when Bernard liad explained that he liad been out by himself. Alar ion having refused to m'company him. "She must have known Mr Chesterton was coming, and got. rid of you. AM our plans liavo fallen through !" "All bally rot, mater!" Bernard protested, when he had at length succeeded in grasping his mother's meaning. "If this Chesterton johnnv was a particular pal of hers and wanted to marry her. she woidd be looking as pleased as a. dog with two tails, instead of down in the .mouth." "Don't you know that some girls cry becaueo thev are happy?" asked his mother, with art expression of resign a - lion.

"lihT Cry because- Oil, I say.' What bally rot ! Then how the deuce is a chap to know whether they're crying because- they're happy or because- they've £«it the hump'" "Shut up!" snapped his father, impatiently, '''['he whole tiring is ridiculous." "It isn't ridiculous.'" retorted Mr* Mostyn. with asperity. •• Bernard will have to be very camful .and exeat himself U> hoi-.'or v., shall be 1,-t'l in tho lurch." She turned t<- I'ernard. who was scratching his head despairingly and twiddling hi? eyeglass a* lt» stared at hot

"Dont, for goodness sake, mention Eyeburn Chesterton's name to Marion, or lei her guess that v.-e have been discussing Iter," -she continued. " T!e unsparing in your attentions; j-henv her that you love her, agree with e/vei'ythinjr that she say.s. and " "And be a man.'" concluded his father. " Pull yourself together and propose to her. Go on proposing—wear her down until she ae-cept-t you." '•Jolly food ideN, dad.'"' ejaculated Bernard. '' I'll do it I Perseverance, and all that nort of ihinu—copybook maxims —what? Don't yon Iret. 'l'll pull it off all rlyht."

'• Wait a day or two. Bernard." cautioned Mrs ZVlostyn. ""Don't try to rush matters, or yon will spoil even-thing." Even while this discussion was in progress Raeburti Chesterton was striding up and clown Mark Sampson's sitting room, furiously relating the rwult of his interview with Muriou.

" I tell you eho's health;.-^—luterly heartless !" he cried, as Mark protested that there must be .some explanation. "I 'numb-led mys-elf, apolojjis.-d. asked her to condescend to explain, and site ridiculed nn—treated me with seo.n an<l contempt." "I. can't er<dit it." said Mark, with aperplexed shake of his big head. " Women are eternally bewildering. I could have sworn, once" I heard your story, that if only you gave her the opportunity to explain all would !>-- well. I r.in'tr- -I don't believe that t-he tricked you, that- tdic made pretence to K.vo you in ortler to worm tout secret-* from you."

"What <lo you Inuieve. then?" asked F.aehurn, passionately ""Would she have betrayed niy trust if she loved rue? Wonld .she have treated me. with contempt and ridicule to-day if she still loved me—as you suggested—and there wa-s some innocent, explanation of her seeming treachery ? Can you find anytliinir U> pay far her sifter what I have told yon''"

He flung hini£=<'lf down in or: armchair and struck the padded arm .'avagely with his clenched list " Cod ! That 1 should have b-ren such a. fool!" lie cried bitterly. "I loved her—trusted her —and, thrice-accursed fool that T am. I love ner yet! It. drives m-> mad to thii:k of it—to think that I should !>.•• breaking my hear, over a woman who care* not a." sin:w for me. who used mo for her own ends and then «-ast me aside. She docr-n't care. Mark ; I toll you -she doesn't care !"

"Ave you sun: Una you showed lift' that von cared?" ayked .Murk, quietly, after a puns*-. "Yes. and the fact seemed to a-mu.-e----her." responded liaehurn, rising to his feet again and huttonfiij; his toat. "Yes. poemed to aimisc b"r ; but I'll show her 1 don't cii-v-!- —show her that I <:.•'.-:> iro on to the vnv ion in spite- of her--vet. siuuv her that f have no need, for her:" "What do you ine::n?" "1 am goin.' to tale the risk of her betraying i'no a se".:iid time, ,iu.d pi-opo.so to l.iidv Violet, iho Primo .Minister's daughter-. 1 am soiritf to set married a* won as possible, and \ lit Minion Lancaster out of my memory— out of my life for ever."

" Rao. okl chap, don't !" Mark : but llaeburu would not listen, volutin out of the room and longing the door behind him. -I WOIKI.T." said .Mark. ahmcl. after .dttiiiji very Mill for a. time—-''T wonder if it was remonse that was eat-in k away Marion's happiness, her Ji re? But no! 1 can't be-lieve. it! -be never betrayed Cheater ton. I won't believe it. The foal has blundoied somehow—some-where—a-ud perhaps I. could put matters to right*. Yet why .should T? Why shotdd I put myself'out to give. .Marion back to Rao Chesterton?" Lens after the- Ihdit h;'.d faded he pat on in the chair suckim,; .'o,an empty pipe and debating the matter with himself, and at latit his mind was made up. " I will leavf> him for the- preent to work out his own salvation, - ' ho decided. '•lf he. is fool enough to make no effort lo put him.self with Marion, then he must put up with the consequences. 1 shall <:ive turn a week or two. and then call on Marion and try to put- matters right. If I fail, or ft' Chesterton has committed tome folly in tho meantime, I am left to play my own hand. 1 care for Marion, and, "if Chesterton won't make an effort to win her. 1 will! Let it go at that. I'll try to play the game." He "let it <*o at that" for the space of a fort-night-, and did not attempt either to see or communicate with Raeburn. of whom he had no news.. Meanwhile Marion had resumed her daily round at the Cedars, sometimes .shopping with her aunt, occasionally visiting a theatre with Bernard Mostyn, and always being 'bored by the- attentions and clumsy compliments of the latter. It. was after dining out and visiting a. theatre that Bernard, well prompted by his father and mother, suddenly «wne to the point. He was on Iris way home with Marion in u taxicab, and for fully five minutes had been-fidgeting with his monocle and coughing nervously. " I say, Marion," he burst out, suddenly, "we get on awfully well together. don't we? What d'you say- to making a match of it?"

''Making a- matoh of it?" repeated Marion, <iW racked ly. " 1 don't quite

She had been lost in thought, had scaTcelv heard what her cousin said, and certainly had not the remotest idea that he was proposing. " Yes, get married—you and I—what?" stammered Bernard. "I'm really frightfully gone on you, Mariou, and we'd be awfully jolly together—what?" "Don't bo absurd!" said Marion, rather sharply. *' The. idea ia quite ridiculous, Bernard. I could never think of marrying you."

"But—er—l say, Marion, I hope, you'll conFiider the matter," spluttered Bernard, with ludicrous earnestness. "Tho people at homo would be awfully pleased, and —er —f—er—well, I think it would he a good thing for both of_ us. Think it over, won't you ? I'm a jolly decent sort of chap, you know, and I'll do anything yon like for vou."

" You arc, as vou say, a jolly decent chap, but I don't want to marry you, Bernard," said Marion, decisively. " Pleaso don't tliink any more about it."

But although Bernard said no more then, he was compelled to think n great deal about it during the next couple of days, for his father and mother nagged him incessantly, accusing him of having blundered.

" Keep on proposing," Insisted Captain Mont vn. "Wear down the opposition." " Refuse to eat when at table," advised Mrs Mostyn. "Go about with a melancholy, despairing expression, and make it clear to Marion that your heart is breaking." "You can't expect a dmp to live without eating!" protested Bernard ; hut he did his level best to carry out his instructions.

His mother, too, was unremitting' in her efforts on his behalf, and threw out many hints, all of which Marion affected to ignore, so that Mrs Mostyn was driven at last to speak more plainly. " I am so worried about Bernard. Marion, dear," <she remarked, entering the hitter's bedroom a3 Marion was doing her hair. "Ho is dreadfullv unhappy, and I can guess the reason. I do hope you will be kind to him. dear. 1 know ho would make you happy. For my sake " She covered her face with her hands suddenly, and rushed out, leaving Marion feeling very uncomfortable. " I don't want to marry him."' said Marion, apostrophising her reflection in the dressing glass. " I don't ca.ro for him. and if I am to be pestered like this I shall go away. I shall tell Bernard and aunt so to-morrow."

Uut the morrow brought news—news. that came, near to causing irretrievable disaster. Marion went down Into to breaknut. to find her uncle and aunt already ."t-ated at the table, and Bernard standing with Ills bands in his pockets glowering out <>{ the window.

"Wood rnorniiii;, my dear," said Mrs Mostyji. pleasantly. " I have some news for vou."

.Site took up the muruing paper as she spoke, and glanced at a patagraph. "" Ye<?:" .-aid Maricii inquiringly, .seating herself, after nodding smilingly to her uncle and llernard. -who were both watching her covertly. "What is it, aunt?"' "Your friend. Mr Raubuni Chesterton. is going to he married,"' announced Mrs Mditvn. " O'h :••

Marion paled very .-slightly, but. otherwise save no .sign of what was passing throuerh her mind.

■'Yes; his engagement, to Lady Violet Vansart is announced in this morning's papers. Quite a. romance, it appears. It seems that it wae Lady Violet who persuaded Mr Chesterton to a,bandon his old partv and join force* with her father. Theie ii> quit* a lot, about it in the paper.'' Marion took the proffered paper with » steady hand, read the announcement, then handed the newspaper back to her aunt. "How interesting:" she remarked, quite steadilr.

"Isn't its" gushed Mrs Mcstyn. " S<jems to be a 1 ear love, match. I suppose, you will have to write and congratulate Mr Chesterton, Marion." (To be continued.)

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AN INNOCENT JUDAS., Evening Star, Issue 15653, 18 November 1914

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AN INNOCENT JUDAS. Evening Star, Issue 15653, 18 November 1914

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