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DEATH OF LORD ROBERTS.

WELLINGTON, November 15. The Prime Minister has received the following message from the High Commissioner, dated Loudon. November 15: Lord Kitchener received this evening the following telegram from Geineral French : “Deeply regret to t> 11 you Lord Roberts died at, 8 this evening " Lord Roberts was on a visit, to France to greet the Indian troops, a.nd contracted a chill on Tlmrsdav. lie succumbed to an attack of pneumonia >n his 83rd year. ACTIVE TO THE END. Press Association—J!y Telegraph—Copyright. LONDON. November 15. (Receiver) November 16. at 8.45 a.m.) Lord Roberts had been reinarkabh active since the beginning of the war. He dealt with a vast 'orrespoiulence with friends in the a tiny, to whom he gave advice and sympathy, and wan a constant visitor at the Gcvermnenl departments. Ho was apparently in robust health, and the suddenness of his death caused a groat shock.

Time were many references in the churches. Lord Roberts was making a brief vi-il to the Indian troops, of whom he wav t’clomd-in-t hief. He , out raeied a, .hill <>n Thursday, and succumbed iu pneumonia. THE KING'S SORROW. A FITTING SUGGESTION. BURIAL AT ST. PAUL’S. LONDON. November 15. (Received Noveirtier 16, at 12.5 p.m) Tile King and Queen are greatly d)stp’sserl a*. Lord Roberts’s death, and have s-enl. messages of <■.-miolence to his v. (: <■ and family The quest inn of the interment of Lord Rolveris’s remains in St. Pauls Cathedral is being considered.

A TRANQUIL END.

SIR JOHN EREV IPS APT ME-SAGE. Press Association —By Telegraph—Copyright. LON’DON. November |5, (Rer.etvrd November 16, at. 1 To p.m ( Lord Roberts had a rough |>a.‘iage cussing th.> Channel on Wedmt.day. He. was accompanied by his danglitei. and g..v<* m> sign of distress on larding- He visned the British bases aid camp? on Thursday, and on Friday he Inspected the Indian troops. A chill developed on Friday even-,tig, and ho complained of slight pam "it Satin day, wivcli his doctor* relicv<d. He fell into a quiet deep, in -vliiob he uani|Utiiy expired. , , Sir .lollit French, in teirgiupmug a message of condolence |» the widow >m bcbalt of the army, said : " It seems a lit ; ; tming 1„. the life- "I so great- a ddt't tnat tm should have passed av ay in the midst or the t.ronps he loved so well ami "Until sound of the guns. AUSTRALIA'S TRIBUTE. TO “ EMPIRE'S GREATEST SOLDIER." Press Association— By Telegraph Copynghc SYDNEY. N ovembor 16. ■Receiv'd N’eveudver 16, at 9.u.) a.m ) Leading articles in the Ausiialiati Press pay a tribute to Lord Rob. its a? me Empire’s greatest eoldier Tim . Jovern.or-Gvr.eral (h.r I,'iiia.d Munro-FergusoT cabl-.d u* (eiint... Robert* that the Australian forces mourn ihe '.'>?* <>f their Colonel-m-C hie,.

SYMPATHY FROM THE GOLONIcS.

[l>.n Unitkd Puns? Association.] WELLINGTON. November 15. At the request, of the. Prime. Minuter tw Governor s-nt the following .'able lo toe Sriretaiv of Slate for tlv ( oloinc.-: Mvsplf. Tv (. nii'l in p r pr T !, ‘ of New Zealand learr.crl With the d^pe.--' crn-o«- of th - death nt hj leM-.Ma I dl-.l 1 ■. Robert*. who did so mmh to uphold ihe honor and inte C rhy of the Knnure. am. who e-mv-d the low oi toe whole l.n -l „,e. Pierre, envoy our dp-est mnpethv to Lady Roberts and her fam'-V-

-THE PASSING OF “BOBS”

■p n r rl-ath of Karl Ilobe.tr, lias ebbed 11m British nation of one of the most, honored of her sons and Urn British Army of the man who in our generation has most truly served its “rout traditions. As an oilier. Ins rawer was one of unbroken success 1-orlunc-tavored him throughout Ins .service, but the favor she bestowed on him was such aa onlv bravo men desire or deserve—opportunity to display those qualities of personal gallantry, of perseverance, and infinite capacity for patient organisation which have earned him a place of honor among the great names of our military history. Frederick Sleigh Roberts was born at Cawnporo on the 30 th September, 1832, the second son of a distinguished soldier, General .Sir Abraham Roberts, G.C.B. After an education at Eton. Sandhurst, and Addiscombe, ho received in December. iB5l, bis first commission in tho Bengal Artillery, and joined a field battery at Peshaw'ur. His first opportunity came with tho outbreak of the Indian Mutiny in 1857. He served a.s staff officer with the Punjab force, but was later attached to the Delhi arnqy. During the fighting round

A GREAT SOLDIER AND A GREAT MAN.

Delhi he had three horses shot- under him, and was himself wounded in an engagement- on -July 14 By Scpt-em-h-cr ho was well enough to take command of part <>t a. siege batteiy and siia.r? in the lighting that followed the cutty into the i-itv. With Colonel Great hod's column he was present at. the actions of Bitlamk-har, Ahgahr, Agra, Bithur, and Kanauj : he followed Rir C’din Campbell to the second relief of Lucknow, and took part in December in the- Battle of Cawnpore. It- was in January, at the Battle of Kudagunj, that ho won his fust and cm, Rest honor. Me quote bis -own voids from InV ' Forty-om-Years in India ' ; I. caw Y-ounglin.-b.!".:! fall, but- 1 (fluid not go to his as.-idae,re, as a! that momonl Olio of hie .-. e.vr.;- was in dimperil from a- sepoy who was attacking nim with hie fixed bayonet, and bad 1 not helped Dm man and dupedd ol his opponent, he must li.'iv" been killed. Ino n-ext. moment 1 descried in Dm Distance two sepoys making of with a .-tandard. which 1 dotei mined innM, raptured, so 1 rode- after the rebels and o'ertook

I | them. ::!'d while u imr tt.i.ir I he s!:ifl out ' -,r !)■■• 1 1 , 1111 b- of ih-m, whom I i tv, n:b ' 1 ■ !e i in. 1 : j'< i tunal-Iy f >r me i! !I I - • -I I i i * . a i 1 e:i; i <i "II 1!I I mamkiiT I At I lie bottom I.f ; he p:t!><. hj added, as 'll!:.null bv ■■■<•• av V!h- r;rrn : 'Fm tAw ••;w,, act.- 1 «;■. i P ■ Vim .pa : -Cross." Alter Pm mp -.f l.m know , and tiie ban "! k".. iu Hi- u hj" '.'-mt ■ hi -mo Oil silk leave, hj, sl'h i'll, to the , V.U.. le was s i:w; m ni nine,! in I despatch"?, re, cived i*i iiuH.;l t» 'til three i mati.ni v. N\ I.r!.■ hnu'e on ! -ave m lojJ 1 he mavri-d Mi-- v ,„ . Ibm.-, Water:- i 1. j His next i.imi,.i 1m : '" re the I mbeyla War ; i„ ihe ino-.inl..i , i> N’.W. of P.-siiaunr. for 'which he iv. Amd Hi- lie.l.i a l.d Gasp. ‘ -Mid the Abvs - ! i ■ ia :. W :ir ■'! Iho;, ;i, Wlllell I he :-.n;d P u im ! '' ni: m [ m ■ . ! pmain- : 1 v Si,- !’ il". -t N il : p. take lb me Dm ~| p..,,, ,•..!■, _ 1 H- v-i - I in'' ■ tinu s . 11 e i i * i 1 :. - 11 . a i 1 i • i ■ i v 1 lb" T".. i 1 1 ! 'd a 11..,• lev. H- I '' m-ll 'd P ; . L'dia in UM9 a- F;i ; As-kmui ir:i l.T'P'p r.t l and ib:. d --ut m 1871 dr:> LiPbai Fxpedu in y l ''h !m t pari. ! 1 1 r " ■ ip l'i V hum!- 1 mil- ’ '’m ' M T:. A: am - r.f : I." d-' si I ra I !C ] i i of w’m, hj Reverts ’’a-' m • ■ maamb -o.ci 1 1 his • . 1 1 11 i 1 n igi ■ la Via mad.- ■ p a.parmmt ! of the 8.-uh. Hi.- new minis w.-re <" si’i - :; ir-cud Iby c,um> m D-b.i ; -n w--1 pifd m -if th- R‘ ma - "i V • ' - - '' ,0 I India i V UV6. md :■■ j ; n A J 'v-lihMV-m'vbp-L v'’r '' -'d'bnP pr-v-.i L-Bc. Th aah' hi ;AiAmn W,,,. Pmp .;,v. IA ■ ia ■ aimnai! i - ! the 1 Kurnr’u force, rum ..f Guv .ulinmi marchm'uu into AlYbatb-.aia H- ("‘A a iblii nil; it ion a! J ’ i ■■ .i r lv ' d b| a we],dir.•. t ad lb'nd,n;_' ri" m. aa '. P a' .l P'"!P tmitre! the pa-v 1!.- -h.-u Mb ,o take hi, rdae- m, the Army . mvl, hut ■ was recalled in Senli-m’. loo', '-y I m; ■ news of th-' masoi.-re ol tie’ < aviicnnn Mi-ion at Kabul. Hi- van the -..dy imntediatelv ataila’de ,md a le-t.ten-ant -general lie advanced aaauv Amir Yukiib Khan. .V ’he her,.- m I hara-ci ,1m won a iva.'He vidnP, ~:in y Kabul wit hem fui'tli-! o|.; osiu-in, a y-‘ Mowed up lv -era- - a- .be bathe Pt.r. In the ’I'G”- 1 “‘f • Stewart 1 no!, .ornivnl. m ai ~ "hj , t - dciveted him-. If to tim ' ■aiii-atmn "to I ran-porf eori's. b M "- !i needed, for iu .lids' came the new- o| the defeat r.f a Bvili-ii bp_'e‘ie a I Mill wand ; ~,.d ,1m si,me l.mupvmt vvrai I rim-ro-c in Kbandahar. Rebel",v. a-- ordered t.i -la n. a I once th- K-.e-m will, 10.0AO men and )ii s tu'-.v <..rp L hi' l '. v --• - hi - I prea.e-t milisary inuti-oh. Starling on i tngU'l n . lie arrived ,m Jshmidaii:i vai Pie | M-t. having marched 'd • me. . m .It.-. . On ,|,c morrow ho w- n th- bap'e .J Mian- j dahar. For hiv _srvv;-c- ttot-i ■•'’"’ “J I |C i iva- menti'.iied cnrb.t imm- bi oe-oatclies. j (hanked bv br.ll. 11 mi-" of Parliament ; and bv the fb ■Verm .r a d u "d. ere:,ted | K l ' B. and CA Ab. and re . ived a oamn- , etev. tlm medal with bur . lan-, and llm | br.jn/e -t I r. lie 1 hell ".i:U H ane. but j on the arrival the >'e>v- -! * m- d-a-fer j at ,\r.ajuba Hill !.•■ wa- di-pw; -bed to take emr.inand in South Afrt ’.'i, 1" t arrived t-i find that peace had been made. In 1836, as (‘rurnnnr.der-in-Chn t in India, ho undertook the Riirmem War, for which he received the medal, the (t.C. 1.1 ... and a general-hip. In 1800 he received Prince Albert Victor in India : iu 1391 planned the Zhnb and Hunza, Nngar campaigns; in the New Year honors of ]£D2 he \va = raised to the peerage as Baron Roberts of Kbandahar and Waterford, and in 1893 left India for tlie last time with the honor of G.C.S.T. The vear 1895 saw- him appointed I'icld-marslial and Privy Council ]nr, and lie succeeded Lord Wolsoley in the Irish command. At the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria he was honored with a Knightship of St. Patrick. His last campaign began in 1900. The defeats of Magersfontein, Stormberg. and Colenso had filled the nation with horror ; Lord Roberts himself had suffered a, heavy personal bereavement by the loss, in a gallant attempt to save tho guns at Colenso, of his only- son. In December, 1839, he was sent ’out to South Africa as Com-mandcr-in-Chicf. He arrived in January at Cape Town, and the face of tlie war changed with his advance into the Orange Free .State. He relieved Kimberley, Ladysmith was, saved, and on the anniversary of Majtiba (February 27. 1900) CTonje surrendered to him at Paardeburg with 5.000 men. Iu March he entered Bloemfontein, Matching was relieved, and on Juno 5 the British troops occupied Pretoria, tha

capital of the Transvaal. Lord Roberts handed over the final stapes of the war to Lord Kitchener, and sailed for England to take the office of Conmiander-in-Chief in succession to Lord Wolseley. On his return Queen Victoria presented him with tile Order of the Garter, and on his arrival in London he drove in procession with the Prince and Princess of Wales to Buckingham Palace. On January 14, 1902, Queen Victoria received him in audience, and raised him to an earldom. It was the Queen's last public duty; she died 10 days later. At her" funeral the Kaiser decorated Karl Roberts with the Order of the Black Kagle, and he received for his services in Sooth Africa, with the thanks of Parliament, a grant of £IOO.OOO. From this time his life was retired, hut not empty. He bore (be second sword at the coronations of King F.dward VII. and King George I'.. and visited the Courts of Europe as special envoy to announce the latter's accession. In 1905 he resigned his seat on (be Committee of National Defence, and devoted himself to the encouragement of rifle-shooting and the movement, in favor of national military -civice. He became, president of the National Service League. In 1908 be re-pre-enter) the British Army at the Tercentenary of t.lnebee. In the spring of 1914 he was prominent among the supporters of the Covenant for the defence of Clster against tb--> Home Rule Art. As an author be was known by bis study of the ’Ri-c of Wellington' and bis -lining early autobiography ' Forty-one Years in India.' Among other than military honors he--to'-ed on him mav be mentioned doctorates i f Oxford. Cambridge, and Dublin I’iiiv.'-r.i! i:-, and the Order of Merit which he received in 1902. He leaves two da tighter-. His heiress, by special remainder. i- l.ady Aiiecn Mary Roberts. REFERENCES AT THE CHURCHES. It. gnarly a!! Die iity and t nhnrb i.n chip eV“" la.-t e\ i-ning •;nnonnr"ineiit wntrade of th' 1 nation's loss, the news of Lord Roberts's dr- th having Iwen telephoned by ti im-m' *>r of <mr .-t iff. At Ail S.tigs' rlnfvh Dean Fitchett. >••*- fet'-'i- in the di-.iih of l.ord Be bens, ori.tfd a ; nit anii-U. in the 'Hibbard .ban ra! ' : "There is ope duty of the IV’tish (ih/ o at Die present time; men and vo to n voro.: ansi old. rah and poor, nil '- : k •, rnm' pin,-.- everything at- the service of Dr- Stat.-., Vn'iimg must- he kept he k • jam. energy, money. talenr, even life ft. -■ r1 f iim-i he f erlv ofl'ered in this sttpren.e erisis." The Dean .said that these words, the op-aiing i-.i i.ls of the arli.le. might be •;.kr-r. as the last im-spree of Ford Roberts to the nation. ]n them, ho being ipad yet pn leak-'-t hj. At Die l-'i' -t t r )inr.-li. the Rev. Graham H. Raifoui- -poke ~f Lord Roberts as a national hero, and the Co!iinel-iii-( 'hief of Dm Doinintion Kxjieditirnary Force. At Ids iv diiesi, tlx- organist -M> Jesse Thuson) played the Dead Maivh. ]n delivering a speci.il sermon at Dm MVahoHift (’hiii oh. ( argiii road, on ‘V by Hi 1 God Not Intervene in This WarY the Rev. T. Read aiinoiinood u-eeipr of the news of I/.rd Roberts's death.

lin cnterinir the pulpit .it the Rosly.u Presi-vl-ii.-ut (Timt’i I:i-( evening the R-;V. W. Gr:-v Dixon .'m!i<imie"d the death of F-i'D Varsha! Lord Rohetts. and asked Die eoiipi-egati ii to ring the hymn

Now tii" laborer's task is o'er. Now t-V battle day is past. Ib r icu'c was made to Lord Jlolverls.'s i’i aih in praver.s .and sermon, and the oii'ani-l (Mr l.iudLv; plan'd the Dead \ja) r|] ‘ in ‘ Sauk’ At St. Raul's Cathedral intimation of /.o;,/ h’ohej death iras ronveroi) in .% .-in’ i'd | raver composed by Archdeacon Won'iliu i'oc ami incorporated in the inter-ir-.yiin for war prayer. This expressed t i.ankl illness "or siu hj mi energetic. noble life as that of Lord Roberts, and the supplication that there might never bo wanting to tin- Empire a. snceession of men loyal to their Church, anxious to strain corn- nerve to canv out, the great mission of emu I re. In his sermon Archdeacon Wood) hoi pe gave a short account of Lord fk do r; life, eulogising his wonderful devotion, and expressing what, had been (■■id him hv friends who knew the decease I intimately and had lived in Ins iiniiie- viz.. the simplicity of his religion, tin- devotion of his diurchmanship, and ho nm easing labors for the Empire. Tho u. aeon emphasised tho fact that Inins v, litings and by Jus speeches Lord Rolcil.- lin’d done ills very liest to make tho English people recognise tho absolute mwessitv lor having an army adequate to the necessities of the Empire. Tho rev. gentleman stated in conclusion that from ids own obsr-i rations in Germany and by ( a refill study of the Continental problems of 1 the woiiel politic he could fully apprei ■; i■ al! ih;d i.onl Hobcits had done tio stir ilic I’inolish people to the very depth, and ;u a time when twenty Churchmen to one Xoni’oii foi mist had gone to thc_ front the 1,..c0ii was gtaditiilly hut reallv sinking into (he iiyind of the nation. The last v, ,of I,’it'd Roberts, as we had them in i,ls at tide in the latest issue of ‘Hih--I.< n's .iounini.' ought to be taken as a rail to every thinking man in (he Empire..

Ai South’ Dunedin T’lobyUu i.m Church lln' Rev. 'it, Vainn.'iid intimated the rc-.-cipf Ilf the news of tho death of Earl Roberts. ami paid a iribntc to tho long, f.i ji hfnl . and splendid services rendered by him to the Knifiiro. Ho must he regarded a- a (led fearing man. a loyal and brave soldier, and n mo>t distinguished general, K. whom the Empire owes a very great debt of gratitude. In the special prayer ottered for I'uidiiiiet! and the succors of

(,;ir tiftus in the present war crisis, thanks v.ore offered for the life work oj the departed general, and blessing sought for the bereaved relatives. The National Anthem was also sung.

.At the Moray ’ I‘la-e Congregational fTurrli the Rev. W. -Saunders, wneu announcing the death of Lord Roberts. made dei idy a ppm iativo referenee to the great services ho had rmdricd to ihrr Kmptre. especially in India and Afn’ia, during as manv M-;t« as mcasurid the lull ppan of most lives. Mr Saundns spoke o; him as ;• great soldir-r, a genuine patriot, a i. id utl.-man. especially in his relation.: with ids troops, whose heart he completely v. on ; abo a.% a good husband. and in ail respects a true man. WhaU can one pay la-tier * asked Mr Saunders. than what was sai I long eco hv David of one wlioiif he honored "Know ye .not there is a prince ai’d a gicat. man fallen inis day in Israel." At Knox Church Professor Dickie said that the whole British nation was mourning the death of I hat able, brave, and }ialicit o' so --her. Karl Koberts, wno had reudmed such signal s.Tvhe to his eotint,v. Throughout his j*.ng life he malutn'iiied a humble and sincere trust in and

reliance upon <l"d. and he (the preacher) vcn'.uied to believe that Ear! Roberts v\,i; 11; 1 live in our nation's history more by what he was 'ban by what he did. The hvtnn ' N’o-.v ill' Laborers' Task is Done'

fu;:L'. *liid ilit- Dead March was played in an impressive manner by the organ if t .Mr Paget <»a]-;;, I!).-■ congregation st-a nding lii,. while.'

lliir Rev. D. Dutton made the .announce iiit'iit* at Oivi irhaiii Pr.-ehylt-rian rimrch (in.i the >.)ganDt Mr Madio.i j-layrd lh. it.:;:i .Man ';.

The IU-v, W. f-corgic, who conducted the rcrvi. q at Si. Clair Presbyterian Church last night, announced the death just before the prayer, and ashed the congregation to Join in’the petition that God would comfort the Borrowing family and strengthen the Empire in the hour of its great, loss. The rev. gentleman t-poke feelingly of Lord Roberts's great achievements as a soldier, and laid stress on his anxiety for the physical and moral welfare of his troops. The R-ev. W. h-pence, who was officiating at North-east Valley Presbyterian Church, made the announcement concerning Lord Roberts's death, and a special prayer was offered. Tho congregation were deeply sympathetic. Canon Curzon-Siggers referred at St. Matthew’s to tho death of Lord Roberts as being an ideal death for such a noble man, as he bad doubtless gone to France to show his sympathy with his old commands, and thereby acted up to the high standard of sympathetic consideration for his soldiers wnich had made him the idol of the British Armv. -is a soldier he was firm, just, simple, brave, and the story of his life is that of a tine, true soldier, fearing no man because he feared God so much. Of his death one felt that it was a glorious ending (in the incident of his consideration for others) to a glorious life. The Dead March, was played! during the service by Mr Wolf, F.i.G.C.M., before singing 'Abide With Me.’

The Bev. J. T. Pinfold at Caverrftam Methodist Church made touching reference to the deceased soldier, and a special praver was offered. Similar reference was made bv the Rev. E. Drake at the Roslyn Methodist Church, where the National Anthem waa sung.

At the Methodist Central Mission service in the Octagon Hall reference was made by the Rev. \\. Walker to the great loss that had been sustained by the Empire by the passing away of Earl Roberts, especially at this critical period of its historv.

At Trinity Church the Rev. W. Arthur Hay made reference to the death of Earl Roberta. The preacher said ; "This event will cast a gloom over the British race as great as is likely to be. created by any individual event in the present wax. Lord Roberts was likened to one of the old Hebrew caplaint.. The picture which lives with ns is that of an oid man of indomitable fire and energy flying across the British Isles, stirring the. hearts of hia compatriots to make the supreme sacrifice for hearths and hemes, and awakening them to tlie need for defence against the German hordes. He was a. simple Christinn, a distinguished soldier, one of Britain’s most celebrated sons. The- lines which we insDnetiv-rh- apply to this hero are those penned by Tennyson on tho death of the Duke of Wellington ; He is gone, who seemed so great ’. Gone ' But nothing can bereave Kim Of the. tone he made his own. Being he;e ; and we hel.evo him Something for advanced in state. And that lie. wears a truer crown 'llian any wreath that man can wcava him. Speak no more of his renown ; Lay your earthly fancies down. And in the vast cathedral leave him : God a.-cept him. Christ receive, him." HIS WONDERFUL MEMORY. A sergeant-major who served under Earl Roberts, and who is now resident in Dunedin. toils a story which illustrates two of the generals characteristic virtues—hia astonishing memory and has great courtesy to the men who served with him. "[ liist met Earl Roberts about 1685," says the sergeant-major, "in India, just before be was mad' l Commander-in-Chief of the Indian army, it was at AJlaliabad, where, he i ante l-.» in.-nee-.- «-.ur regiment.. I had j] mouths’ scrvu’O at- ih**- was «t corporal, and had occasion to take him sev'ici message,-. He asked me my name, and said : ‘ I hope you will go on and be a good soldier.' I saw him next at Quetta tLaiu-iio-taii). in April, 1691, after the Ziiob Vall w exiediiion, under fdr George WTo - . 1 was m hospital, suffering from Indian fever. He recognised and ad<liei,;d mo by name at once, and taking rim bv the arm (I was very thin) said he le'p.d 1 would bo out soon, and get up n; IV muscle. Not until 1896, in Dublin, did 1 meet him again, when ho came to insj-eet the automatic flushing apparatus installed at the Ship street barracks. I was deputed to take him round, and. again lie knew me instantly, and epoke very kindly. J saw him, but not to speak with.’ after the battle of Bergandal, in the South African War, but when I had rune back to mv employment in Gape Cdlonv, and just before lie returned home, I met him in the train at Kenilworth. He shook hands with me ’With Jus left hand (his right was injured), told m hj« h;ul been to see an old officer of my regiment, and that he hoped to meet me again. W(, did meet, in 1905. at Kunberlev station, when he had come out for a trip to Victoria Falls. Ho knew me at once, and asked mo to call on him at the Kimberley Sanatorium when lie returned 'rom his trip. I did so, and bad a most interesting conversation, mtti him mil- previous meetings. While we talked Ids daughters took my two children and entertained them.”

\t the conclusion of to-day s meeting of* the executive of the Otago Patriotic and General Welfare Association, the Mayor, who presided, made feeling reference to the death of Earl Roberts. He said no man had done so much in the cause of the Empire as the deceased soldier, and he moved that suitable minute be recorded m the association« books. This was seconded by Mr John Roberts, and carried in silence.

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Bibliographic details

DEATH OF LORD ROBERTS., Evening Star, Issue 15651, 16 November 1914

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4,101

DEATH OF LORD ROBERTS. Evening Star, Issue 15651, 16 November 1914

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