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MILITARY CAMPS

XAKAPAU AND ORINGI COMPARED. Officers and men attending camps m wet weather have vivid recollections ol sore throats and feverish chills inseparably connected with damp feet and sudden changes of temperature. At the Oringi camp in 1913 the medical sUifi were £ept busy up till all hours; and there were over 1000 minor cases ol sickness reported at the ambulance. At i'akapau in 1914, despite the exception ally severe weather, only a few dozen "reported sick," and the general healtn of the men was remarkable good. Now for a solution of this seeming paradox 1 At the Oringi canteen there was no "Flueuzol," but plenty of othei preparations. At Takapau the position was reversed. The canteen contractor; pinned their faith solely to “Fluenzol,’ of which over two gross in the aggregate woa purchased by the troops. In many Instances one bottle would go the rounds of ft tent and be the means of checking taore than one incipient sore throat or feverish attack. Comment is needless! °

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141114.2.96

Bibliographic details

MILITARY CAMPS, Evening Star, Issue 15650, 14 November 1914

Word Count
168

MILITARY CAMPS Evening Star, Issue 15650, 14 November 1914

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