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THE FIGHT FOR FLANDERS.

GATE TO CALAIS STILL SHUT.

NO APPRECIABLE CHANGE.

VIOLENCE OF STRUGGLE UNABATED.

RUSSIAN ARMIES ADVANCE.

FRICTION AMONG THEIR ENEMIES.

BRITISH GUNBOAT SUNK BY SUBMARINE.

UNIVERSAL PRAISE FOR H.M.A.S. SYDNEY.

Press Association —3y

Telegraph—Copyright,

ANOTHER OUTRAGE REPORTED

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun ’ Services.)

LONDON. November 12

I lie Herman.-, shot ihe Mayor of tlan-l/.aerae fur d -fending his daughter against assault by soldiers.

GERMAN BIG GUNS

DAMAGED BV OUR ARTILLERY

AMSTERDAM, November 12. (Received November 13. at 8.55 a.m.l T'hteo German Kin guns damaged by Britisli artillerv fin- have been brought la Lieg-

INEFFECTIVE MORTARS,

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Suit’ Services.)

LONDON. November 12,

The new German trench mortars, instead of having decimated tile Allies, bury thole shells in deep holes, giving the suldieif mud baths, hut wounding none.

the allies

stand FAST

ALONG WHOLE LIN I

despite VIOLENT ATTACKS

ON THEIR LEFT WING

PARIS. November 12

(Received November 13. at 9.20 a.m.) A communique states : The violent-action continues on our left wing, with nnim portant alternate advances and U’treats. Tim battle front, which runs through Lombartzvde. Nicuport, Ypres. _ and YommMce to tho e.->u of Armentieres, remains generally unchanged sime the evening of November 10. The' British repelled attacks, eepceially tbose made by the Prussian Guards

We have field our ground along (he remainder of I lie line, and silenced the German artillery near Craonne (op the Ais.ne. be twee -1 Sniesons and Rbeims), and we slightlv progressed around Beny-au-Par.

IN FLANDERS

NO GERMAN HEADWAY,

ALLIES HOLD TIGHI

TO LINE OF THE YSER

LONDON, November 11 (midnight!

(Received November 15, at 8.35 a.in.) Official : The enemy continued their efforts, but without result. The enemy's counter-attack at Lombartzyde i? Lambersarte, near Lille) was repulsed. The enemy vainly attempted to debouch from Dixmude, otr the loft bank of the Yrer. THF. CAPTURE OF DIXMUDE. MODK,ST GERMAN ACCOUNT. AMSTERDAM, November 11. (Received November 13, at 8.55 n.m.) Air official message from Berlin states that Dixmude, was stormed by the Germans and over 500 prisoners and a number of machine guns wore captured. OF LITTLE SIGNIFICANCE. ALLIES HOLD VITAL LINK. LONDON, November 11. (Received November 13, at 8.35 a.in.) The Paris newspapers point out. that Dixmude was merely a. heap of smouldering ruins. The Allies merely retired a few vards, and etill strongly hold the line of the Vs"r (on which river Dixmude is situated l. THE ALLIES’ STRENGTH. AND THEIR LOSSES TO DATE. PARIS, November 12. (Received November 13. at 9.20 a.rn.) It is estimated that Franco has four millions of men under arms, and has lost aOO .COO in killed, wounded, and prisoners. It is estimated that Britain has 1.800.000 men under arm-, and lias lost 50.000 in killed, wounded, and prisoners. [lt is evident, from the figures given ns to the numerical strength of the British forces, that the term “under arm:-’’ is meant to include reserves now available, and does not refer merely to those now at the front.]

HOW CAPTAIN M'NAB DIED

WHILE TENDING THE WOUNDED

WAS FOULLY BAYONETED

LONDON, November 11

(Received November 15, at 8.55 a.m.) A despatch rider states that Surgeoncaptain Angus M‘Nab was bayoneted before the eves of the London Scottish Regiment while he was bandaging two wounded men. It was bright moonlight at the time, and Captain M'Nab, who was unarmed,; was wearing a blue tunic with the Red Cross on his arm. When the London Scottish saw the foul deed thev gave orders that no prisoners were to "bo taken, and drove back the Germans, giving no quarter and receiving none.

OTHER CASUALTIES

LONDON, November 12,

(Received November 13, at 8.50 a.m.)

Captain Leroy Burnham, who has been wounded and invalided Home, is the Bishop of Perth’s son. Lieutenant Riley, of the Wiltshire Regiment, is a prisoner, but not wounded, in Germany. HONORING THE BRAVE.

LONDON, November 12.

(Received November 15, at 9.20 a.m.) Queen Alexandra was represented a.b Gordon Wilson’s memorial service, held in Christ Church, Mayfair. Many notable people attended the service.

PERSONATING A GURKHA,

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘ Sun‘ Services.)

LONDON, November 12.

An observer with the Indian troops gives the following example of German “slimness ” :

A figure silhouetted against the moonlight and wearing a Gurkha uniform approached the end of a trench, and said: “The Gurkhas are to move further up, as another Gurkha contingent is advancing to their support.” . The officer was puzzled, and asked : “Who are you?" The answer, in good English, was a repetition of the order. Tho officer, ’ still suspicious. said; “If you are a Gurkha, by what lioat dkl you cross to France?” The figure instantly turned and fled, but when yet within a few yards was riddled with bullets. The Germans were ready to swarm tho trenches had the ruse succeeded*

AN EYE-WITNESS’S ACCOUNT

GALLANT LONDON SCOTTISH

ALMOST ENVELOPED

HOW THEY EMERGED

FROM A TIGHT CORN’EH

WELLINGTON. November 1

The Prime Minister has received the following cable message from the High Commissioner, dated London, November 12 : Olfiebd : An eye witno.-s with the British Headij na iters Si aif reports that before a chronological record of the course of events can be resumed a. short description must be given of tie- |->art in th" battle that took place hist October played by the London Scottish Regiment. Rofercnee has already been made to the action, and the ( omui.-inder-in-lThief's message to the officer commanding that regiment has been quoted, but, no details (,f what happened haw U-on given. The event forms an otto, hj in the military history of the. Briti.-h Empire, as it, marks the. first- time a. eompleo- unit of the Territonal army has been thrown into the fight- alongside si.-i .-r units of regulars.

Briefly, what, happened was this: On the Saturday, being ordered to take np a section of the firing line in support, of our rat,dry. and having advanced to a position under a. heavy fire from field guns, howitzers, and nrn-hine guns, the battalion of London j-eottish reached a jioint wliere further movement forward was impossible. There the. battalion maintained themselves until dusk, when they proceeded to ontreneh.

From 9 p.m. till 2 a.in. on the Sunday the Germans made niimcrwis attacks on the Scottish lino, but all wore repulsed by rifle fnv. -\t 2 a,.in. tin* enemy made a great effort, and assaulted the front and left of the position in great force. .V considerable number of German troops succeeded by a detour in getting round the flank of the regiment. A lingo proportion of the.-c were engaged by companies acting as a support reserve: others penetrated* between the first and second liites of the trenches, and assailed the firing line in the rear. For a while, there was thus fighting with rifle and bayonet on both the fund and immediately behind the firing line. The reserve company, still farther behind, made bavonet charges against the enemy who had got round, and so prevented the entire envelopment of the battalion.

At dawn it was discovered that large numbers of the enemy had, according to their custom, worked round the flanks with machine guns. A retirement was therefore carried out. This wa« effected under a cross-fire from the machine guns. Naturally in an encounter of this nature the battalion suffered heavy lose. Though unable to maintain their position, the London Scottish acquitted themselves gallantly, showing coolness in a situation of peculiar difficulty, and they inflicted far more damage on the enemy’ than they received.

THE FIGHT FOR YPRES

A DETAILED ACCOUNT.

Oa the Sunday the full violenre of (he enemy’s attack fell on oui’ Irft. Their main efforts were directed slightly to the south of Ypres. Such was tho force of the on--slauyht and the weight of artillery sup porting it that our line was temporarily driven back. It was toon readjusted, however. and by evening tho situation in this quarter wnt. tho tamo as it had been 24 hours earlier.

_ That night .shells were thrown into \ pres. Farther south the (rormans during tho previous night had retaken tho village of Messiues. and had captured Wyltchaete by 11 o'clock. But our cavalry, working in co-operation with the French, drove them from the latter place by a, brilliant bra one t charge, but did not occupy it. A few prisoners were taken. Tliev "ere only 17 years of age, and said they had had practically no training and but little food. Borne had never fired a rifle.

llio fact of Messince being still retained in hostile hands necessitated a slight adjustment of our front centre. Apart from this there was no change in this quarter, the bombardment continuing all day. During fha action round these villages tho Germans moving across our front suffered greatly from the massed tire of our hoi so artillery at short range. Though they fell literally in heaps, they still canto on with admirable determination. Kouth of the River Lys some trenches which had been lost tho previous night were recaptured. Otherwise the situation remained unchanged, and no attacks were delivered against us, tho enemy contenting themselves with bombarding our trenches. One heavy battery was knocked out by our artillery fire.

One prisoner, captured on the. first clay he entered tho field, stated that in Ids opinion Germany realised that she had failed in her object, and was only fighting to obtain good terms. During the afternoon a German aeroplane was captured quite) uninjured.

On the Monday on our left the pressure was kept towards Ypree. At first our line -was forced back,, but it was restored towards evening by a vigorous advance carried out in co-operation with the French, who rendered very timely assistance. The maximum effort of the Germans was to the south of Ypres, as if to drive a wedge between that town on the north and Arnuntieres on the south. The bombardment of our positions in this quarter was especially heavy, though it was well replied to by the concentric fire of our guns and those of tho French. The French counter-attacked in the direction of Rythchatetc, which remains disputed ground, fiercely blazing amidst a hail of shells from both sides. To tho south tho enemy advanced In force, but were checked. Farther away, towards our right, a hostile attack in tho neighborhood of Armenticres met the same fate. On the extreme right several assaults wore repulsed, though at, one or two points tho Germans gained ground slightly, obtaining possession of Nouvo Chapeilo. The inundation of Nieuport reached tho enemv’s trenches, rund it is slated that two of their heavy guns and some field artillerv had to bo abandoned.

The Tuesday was a comparatively uneventful day, and this enabled our troops to gain a much-needed rest. In front of Ypres the German infantry attacks ceased, but to tho south, in the neighborhood of Wytschaeto and Hollo boke, they made, unsuccessful attempts to push forward, effective counter-attacks being delivered by tho French ami British. In this quarter the fighting was severe. South of the river Lys minor attacks against our trenches wore beaten off. It seemed ns if the violence of the Germain efforts was abating, even their cannonade being less heavy.

THE RUSSIANS

CLEARING POLAND

CROWN FRINGE’S BLUNDERS

AUSTRTAXS IMSGUSTED

WITH SELFISH GERMAN' DIRECTION

FETROGRAD. November 12.

(Received November 13, at C.55 a.in.) The German Staff excuse their defeat at Warsaw by blaming the difficult roads. The Staff are really trying to rover the fiown Prince's failure in toe centre, which lei- driven back headlong, while the wings dd their ground, thus causing a general retreat. There is renewed evidence of AustroGennan friction, principally because the Austrians are compelled to fight as a rearguard in covering the. Germans retreat. The majority of the casualties oi recent engagements in Roland were among the Austrians. The Austrian prisoners are more friendly towards their captors than towards their German fellowprisoners.

DIFFICULT GROUND TACKLED IN EAST PRUSSIA.

LAKE REGION REACHED

PETR OCR AD. November 11

(Received November 13. at 8.55 a.in.) Official : The Russians in East Prussia have approached the ('astern outlets of the Masurian Lakes. There have been engagements la vtn nine to our arms at Goldapp. Olava, (1 Mlawa), and Soldan. Our vigorous offensive in Galicia continued, GERMAN GENERAL. ALLEGED CAPTURE BY RUSSIANS. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ’Sun’ Services.) LONDON. November 12. it is reported that at the battle of Sieradz the Russians raptured the. German General Von Makenge with his Staff. [Sieradz is in West Poland, between Lodz and Kalisz. ) A BALTIC MINE. RUSSIAN CRUISER'S ESCAPE. DUE TO PICKET BOAT'S HEROISM. LONDON, November 12, (Received November 15. at. 8 55 a.m.) The Petrngrad newspapers record (he patriotic self .sacrifice of a Russian picket boat. Her crew o>' seven men. real! dug that it was impossible to signal a warning to a swiftly-appr, ..n-hi-ig Russian cruiser, saved Hie latter by rushing (he picket boat full speed on to a mine in the Gulf of Eirdand. A terrific explosion followed, which killed six of the boat's ciew. The Tsar has decorated the sole survivor. INDIANS AND TURCOS. KAISER COVETS THEM FOR SERVICE WITH TURKEY. COPENHAGEN, November 12. (Received November 15, at 8.55 a.m.) The Kaiser has ordered all Mohammedans eajitmvd from the. Allies to be sent. In Constantinople to serve with the Turkish army. INDIA'S LOYALTY. (London ’Times’ anti Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) LONDON. November 12. The p.'O'-ess of passing resolutions affirming complete loyal’y to the British cati.-r proceeds steadily throughout India. TURKEY AND EGYPT. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney 'Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 12. Feverish preparations are continuing in Syria against, Egypt.

TilF GOLDFNTS ESCAPE

1! I! lITSH ADMIRAL COURT MAUTTAI.LED.

HIS ACQUITTAL RETORTED

LONDON. November 12. (Received November 13, at 9.20 a.m.) Tho ‘Globe’ states that a court martial acquitted Rear-Admiral Ti on bridge respecting the, Goeben'.s e.-eape to the Dardanelles from the Mediterranean.

GERMANY'S CEREAL STOCKS

PRICES SOARING

(London "limes’ and Sydney ‘Sun' Services.)

LONDON. November 12. A German agricultural report shows that wheal has risen in price by 29 per cent., rve 30 per cent . oats 26 per cent., and flour 60 per cent., as compared with An-

gust rates. Another source slates that the barley stocks are diminishing rapidly, and the Government are hesitating to reduce supplies to brewers, because a shortage of beer would dishearten the population. IN SOUTH AFRICA. QUASHING tST REBELLION. A.MXKBTY PROCLAIM El). CAPE TOWN, November 12. (Received November 15, at 9.10 a.m.) The Union Government have m'odalrncd an amnesty, in which (hey announce that those who surrender will not be prosecuted under the criminal law, but will be allowed to return to their homes. Tim amnesty, however, does not extend to those who have been guilty of breaches of the rules of civilised warfare. COLONEL MARITZ REPUDIATED BvllLS RELATIVES. PRETORIA, November 12, (Received November 13, at 9.10 a.m.) Six of the Maritz family, all relatives of the rebel lead ear, are now- serving witii tho Government forces. They have published a letter in the ‘ Volk stem' to Colonel Maritz, stating that the family will shed their blood in order to wipe out the stigma be has brought on thoir name.

THE SYDNEY'S VICTORY.

A WEEK’S FESTIVAL. SYDNEY, November 13. (Received November 13, at 9.15 a.m.) Tho One Million Club have started a movement to celebrate the Sydney’s victory with a week’s festival of Australian drama, interlarded with patriotic speeches and other items to arouse enthusiasm. Tho proceeds will bo devoted to relieving the Sydney’s injured and for making presentations to her officers and crew. GLOOM IN GERMANY. THE GREATEST HERO OF THE WAR. AMSTERDAM, November 12. (Recived November 13, at 10.20 a.m.) The Gorman Press admit that the loss of the Ernden is painful, since British trade in Indian waters is again secure. The news, has caused a deep depression following on the proud days after tho Chilian engagement. Germany regards Captain Muller as the greatest hero of the war, and proudly recalls the fact that tho British had always praised his bravery and chivalry. TUI' STORY OF THE FIGHT MELBOURNE. November 13. (Received November 13, at 9 15 a.m.) Hie Eastern Extension Cable Company report that communication with. Cocos is fuilv restored.

The manager, in an interview, said that tho staff on tho island were aware that they were under the protection of (he British Admiralty, though warships were seldom seen. As soon as the Kronen was seen approaching tho 8.0.5. .signal was sent out, and also a rush cable to tho Naval Office at Melbourne, whereon they must have acted very promptly.

A remarkable feature of ihc affair ivafthat tho Kmden, which mint have hoard the distress signals, did not shell the wireless mast.

Ak soon as the landing party stopped ashore they commenced to put the cable out of aciion, hut, as a. result of their long experience, the staff were able to baffle the raiders- to tome extent, special precautions having been taken to meet such an incident. 1311011 the .Sydney hove in sight, the landing party took to their boats to rejoin the Kmden, hut. the captain apparently decided that it was too risky to wait to pick up the boats.

The party then put back and wafehed the fight, from tlie land, and remained ashore till night, when they seized the 40-ton schooner Ayesha and sailed away. Although the raiders made sure of a substantial food supply, tins is not likely to embarrass the cable staff, who have no further news of the Ayes ha. UNIVERSAL PRAISE. WHAT' ITAfA*. PRANCE. AND INDIA THINK. LONDON. November 12. (Received November 13, at 9.10 a.m.) The British newspap-’rs continue to give jwoiiilnenwi to the Sydney’s exploit, and publish extracts from Mr Massey's Papakura speech. HOME. November 12. Many newspapers refer with admiration to the. destruction of the Erode,n and the chivalrous Ireatmont of the captives. The ‘(Romaic d’Jtalin ' says that the victory shows the enormous resources of the British Empire, and emphasises the part Australia, is playing. PARIS. November 12. The ‘Tents’ says: "We hasten tosalide the first victory of the young Australian Navy, which rnmjrensal.es to some extent for Admiral Craddock's defeat.'' COLOMBO, November 12. There are constant referen, es m (he newspapers and public spec, h--s throughout India to (lie iinportan-v of the Australian fleet's services -ei behalf of trade security, and profound relief is expressed that the Eluden is destroyed. THE HIGH COMMISSIONER'S CABLE. ENEMY'S HEAVY CASUAL’IY LIST. WELLINGTON. November 13. The following message has been received by the Prime Minister from the High Commissioner, dated London. Novrm-b-r 11 : Official: The Admiralty announces that 1b- captain of Hie Linden ami Prince I'Tanz Joseph Huhenzollorn (the Kaiser’s nephew; aiv both prisoners and u.iuounded. Unofficial ; The losses the Kmden were 200 killed and 30 wounded. Ihe Admiralty diieets that tin- honors of war arc to he accorded to the survivors, a.nd that the captain and otfireis are not to be. deprived of their swords.

A GUNBOAT TORPEDOED

IN' FULL VIEW OF T HOI'S AN OS. THE SLTSMAI!INK AGAIN SCORES, I.UNIX IN, November 12. The Press Huicau repoits that a Gorman submarine, torpedoed the gunboat Niger in the llmvr.s. Tile. Niger foundered, bu*. ail the wllhcis and i 7 of the crew were saved. Thousands of spectators on tin- ;-m front were watching 100 ships anchor, <1 in the I.Viivn-, when suddenly an -explosion of smoke was scon rising, !he Niger was two miles out. The on iiiTPiii-fl caused gioat. excitement. Seoi. s oi .-born boats wore launched, niid the crew were rescued. The N'igt j r stink in 20 n.innbs. Three of the survivors wore injnied by the explosion. A siibnir.i inc was coon by the torpedo boats which were piatvolliieg the Downs, hut they failed to catch the intruder.

The following cable message has been received by the Prime Minister from the High Comnii.'idoner. dated London, November 12 fiioon).-

Official r Tho Niger was torpedoed by a submarine this morning in tho Downs, and foundered. All the ollicers and 70 of the crew were, Raved. It is thought that there was no loss of life.

[The Downs roadstead is off the eastern coast of Kent, opposite Calais. The Niger was ii. torpedo gunboat of ft 10 tons, with a speed of from 19 to 20 knots an hour. She carried two 4.Tin quick-firers, four or five 3-pounder or 6-pounder quick-lb ers, and two to five torpedo tube.-. She was built. 1892 95-1 DETAILS OF THE DISASTER. ri'T.LIG COMMENT. LONDON, November 12. (Receive.! November 15. at 8.59 a.m.) The Niger was anchored and the e.vew were dining at tho time of the disaster. When the captain saw tho torpedo ho called out to close the watertight dnons. A few ficcondt; later site wait struck justaft of tho foiemaat, and an explosion followed . A member of tho ci--w saw (lie submarine come to the surface some distance a way, but she disappeared in a few moments

The Niger commenced to settle, and the crew quietly mustered. Many soon jumped overlsaird, relying on their lifebelts and life collar?. Lieutenant commander Muir, after a, last search for any of the crew remaining, jumped into the sea as the, gunboat sank in eight fathoms. There is much comment in Deal over tho fact that some small cruisera were lying in tho Down? near tho Niger for two days, and only put Id sea yesterday in a half gale. It is suspected they are covering tho submarines movements. MATE STEAMER COMMANDEERED. LONDON. November 12. (Received November 13. at 9.10 a.m.) The Government have tommandecred the Otwav. There will be no diiect mail to Australia next week.

N.Z. EXPEDITIONARY FORCE COMMITTEE.

LONDON, November 13. (Received November 13, at 12.10 p.m.) Lord PJunket presided at a meeting of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force Committee The Hon. T. Mackenzie announced that Fir George Pragnell had given the commitee the use of his firm’s new residential club, with 150 bedrooms, at Blackheath as a convalescent homo for New Zealander?. The War Office provides the necessary hospital accommodation. Lord Islington has been appointed chairman of the Imperial Advisory Committee, vice Lord Emmott.

AUSTRALIAN METAL MARKETS.

MELBOURNE. November 13. (Received November 13, at 10.10 a.m.) In the House of Representatives Mr Hughes gave on explanation of the recent searches into the control of the metal markets. He stated that these had long been to a great extent in the hands of Germany, or corporations winch are British, have been controlled and chiefly owned in Germany, the gicat part of the profits finding its way to German pockets. Though precautions had been taken to prevent the products themselves reaching the enemy, there was reason to believe that attempts' were being made to trade with, tho enemy. The Foods Board recommended substantial increases in the prices of wheat, bran, and pollard.

NO RIGHT TO SUE

SYDNEY. November 13. (Received November 13, at 10.10 a.m.) In connection with the application of the captain of a. seized German steamer to demand his expenses and cha before handing over the cargo to the owners tho Registrar of the Supreme Court, ruled that an alien emeny had no right to sue.

GERMAN TENDERERS NOT WANTED.

AUCKLAND, November 13.

The City Council last night accepted the tender of Ru-hardson, M’Gabe. and (V for cables—overhead £845. ! ad sheathed £1,210 Bs. Y.L. cables £1,516 subject to the committee being satisfied that, the firm are British. 5 lie.- was a unanimous expression .if opinion on the pait'ot the ( oiinciiloie that evert' cr.r-.* idionld be exei ej.-ed to prevent city 'ontracts being given to Gentian firms or to (leiman liiins in.ifionorading under British mintes.

DUNEOIN WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION. To-dav is " Smokers’ Day, and boxes are at tile Early Sett leva' Hall and at sevelal of tlie. tub;.< eord.-ts :n t.he (.Tty l_* receive tiie eontrtbusioiis of tile l users of the fragrant weed. What is. asked iVr is a monetary donation equal to an a vet age week’s expend it in bv eaeli on tnVia.cco and mutches, and this will be forwarded to England f<*r the purpose uf providing the n;..-n who an lighitng our battle.-, with a Christmas box in tin- form of a whilf o' hre-ey eaeli. Many offerings had been made- up to neon to-day. and it is hoped that the m-pom-e to i in- appeal will be. a libera! one. 'lb- boxes will bv left an tin- hall and in the simps over Satin-lav (i.o-moiiowl.

Tin? !a<lies who at?- pioviding afternoon tea, at the. Art Society's exhibition tomorrow .ire Lady M'Le.m. .Mrs ,1 dill Roberts. and Mrs- Sim. Ktere will be- music, too. The public are reminded that half lb-- proceeds from the sab- of admission tickets to the exhibition gel's l I the Lady Liveipool fund. There ladies who have any ks iea ly for the Qu« ni Mary land at - : -qvesied to send them in to tin bail a- - u as possible. ' Mr (). M. Tin a-.- n. M.P.. has rn-eiv-d the folKw;-,;.' t-Kgr.iin flout le. i Minister of Internal Al':'e.us ilim If a. H. D. lii-lb, in ref -rem - ■ the n-qu.,,' bv tuDunedin \V..m--.;'s Ass-.-.at im, that all goods far t i>e Po'it.iu: and !• !g cm re-1 j t fund sKnd.l I an -1 free o;. the vain ways:—" lb- G-w< tnitu ut have arranged to pay railway Height nn g-'-nds lor Belgium ‘to port w b-re lat.-r inmqim-is Halt, but dttlie-ahv C la’ <ai I t.nce sera go «t that, p u-!. and !■ ■-1 i: - nm.-l for the- present mnlinue to store ihr m. Am Hying f arrange t-t-arage a! ‘ in 1 ro-t. but quaulity so large that extreme ditlivulty anticipated." Tim secretary iMiss Biutl states that th- Miniso-r has evidently misunderstood lira nature of the request.. All the Women's Asset .mi -n stsfc.d was for ire,. railage on the go. id a sent Rom country distriGs to Dunedin. Me-srs .Mackerras and Haz.letl .and the National M'-rl gr.-.'-o and Ag-'-nev Company ha?-' been good enough I■> provide all necessary storage mini ami to arrange for shipment _lToin Dnntdin.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

THE FIGHT FOR FLANDERS., Evening Star, Issue 15649, 13 November 1914

Word Count
4,311

THE FIGHT FOR FLANDERS. Evening Star, Issue 15649, 13 November 1914

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