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IN THE BALANCE.

THE FIGHT ON THE FLANK.

ENEMY REINFORCED IN FLANDERS.

BRITAIN NEEDS MORE MEN

FOR A TWO MILLION ARMY.

OPENING OF IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

EMPIRE WILL CONTINUE TILL HER CAUSE HAS TRIUMPHED.

REVOLT AGAINST THE YOUNG TURK PARTY.

GERMANY APPROACHES RUSSIA.

PEACE OVERTURES REJECTED.

Press Association—3y Telegraph—Copyright.

NO RESPITE. VIOLENT FIGHTING CONTINUES FROM ARRAS TO THE COAST. PARIS. November 10 (midnight*. (Received November 11, at 9 a.m.) Ofiicial : The bnt.tlo in the north con tir.ues with great violence. KXEMY TAKE DIXMUDE. BRITISH HOTLY ENGAGED. HOLDING ENEM VS ONSLAt'GnTS.

MORE MEN NEEDED

PARLIAMENTARY LEADERS SUGGESTION.

LONDON, November 11. (Received November 12. at 8.30 a.m.) A letter over the signatures of Mr Asquith. Mr Ronar Law. and Mr Henderson. M.P. (Labor), has been published, suggesting the form of a household census showing those between the ages of 19 and 58 who arc willing to rnlist.

A TWO-MILLION ARMY.

MORE COLONIALS WANTED

PARIS

November 11

(Received November 12, at 9.35 a.m.) A communique states: Tho battlo was resumed with pailicolar intensity between Nieuport and the Lys. W.« maintained our front and rcoccupicd l/mibartzyde. Tho Gwmaiis have taken Dixmude, but. we hold the outskirts of this village, also the canal from Nieuport to Ypim-. The British trmps attacked at. several points, and stopped the cr/.'iny's tierce offensive. The remainder of the front is unchanged. except that we progress north of SoLssons and west of Vailly.

LONDON, November 11 (Received November 12, at 9 a.m.)

Mr Lloyd George has announced that another call for a. further large contingent from abroad is to be made. The fact, of Britain having 2.000,000 trained men would alone, be. a big element in a final settlement.

THE COST OF WAR

ANOTHER BIG LOAN LIKELY

LONDON, November 11,

(Received November 12, at 8.30 a.m.)

HIGH COMMISSIONERS' CARLE

The £500.000.000 i? JCICO.OOO.OOO) war credit voted early in August 'is almost epent. Judications are that the Governmont will rcs«»rt to a £200.000,000 loan, to cover operations to the end of the financial rear.

WELLINGTON. November 12.

The Hid 1 . Commissioner reports under date London. November 10 (5.10 a.m.) : Official : Fierce righting continues _ between the sea -iin'i Armenticies. l*7th r.:des assuming the offensive. The enemy were repuWd. Pio2\\iS has been made near Bixichoote and Ypres. Tho British repulsed the eneniv along their front. An ;idvanoe. was also made in the region of Loivie. between Berry-au-Bac and Rheirns.

TIIE CONQUERED CAPITAL

OPPRESSED BRUSSELS

RELIEF WORK NULLIFIED

COWARDLY GERMAN PRETEXTS.

Fresh attacks in the Vosges were repulsed. The movement of Germans with artillery is in progress through Liege and Antwerp.

AMSTERDAM, November 11

(Received November 12, at 8.30 asm.)

A German proclamation issued in Brussels states that the. citizens have not obeyed the instructions to continue their occupations and they have also failed to execute works ordered by the authorities. The German Government therefore threaten to stop the distribution of food by the American Relief Committee unless those who ought to be employed agree to work. The National Relief Committee, through whom the American Relief Committee work, have i.-sued a reply, in which it is pointed out. that the Germans are using the Belgian railways for the transport of troops, and it is impossible to remove the coal which has accumulated at the pit mouths. The iron industry is at a standFtill, lacking ores, which cannot bo imported ; while manufacturers are unable to reopen their factories. The committee add that the bootmakers, who continue at work, are contributing 20 per cent, of their wages to the relief fund. Hence it is inconceivable that the German Government, after authorising the acceptance of food, should stop its distribution on the pretext mentioned

THE GRIP ON BELGIUM

AND THE PATH TO CALAIS.

(London' Times* and Sydney ' Suu' Services.)

LONDON. November 10. It is e;i!cul»ti'd that the. Germans have concentrated 4.200.000 i?) men between Yum; and Arras. They have sufficient artillftiv to hlas-t away amountain. Around Biusseh flio invaders are working feverishly at fortifying' the town. They aro using a steam entrenching machine and an e!>-'rnioi'6 quantity of cement.

TflE GF.fiMAN PRESS

ANANIAS XOWHERI

LONDON, November 11 Received November 12. at 8.45 a.m.)

German newspapers continue to publish picturesque reports of alleged damage by aeroplane, bombs at. Dover and London, also sensational accounts of the bombardment of the Yarmouth forts, at which England is represented as shivering in her shoe*.

LONDON, November 11 (Received November 12, at 8.45 a.m.!

The, American relief organisation is daily distributing 400,000 meals in Brussels alone. Tne committee complain of Germany imposing heavy tines for slight offences—instancing a fine of £200.000 on Bi'jf.sels for a squabble with the German Guards. These fines are nullifying: the effect of relief in kind.

THE INTERNAL ASPECT.

(London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun ' Services.)

LONDON, November 10. A shattering revolutionary outbuak by

the unemployed is predicted in Germany

PEACE OVERTURES ALLEGED

ITU- USES OF CAYALRY

FROM GERMANY TO RUSSIA

DEFINED BY THE KAISER

SCOUTED AT ONCE

(London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun ' ServicM.)

LONDON. November 11

(Received November 12, at 8.30 a.m.)

LONDON. November 10.

When the Kniscr was in Belgium at the beginning of the month, and reviewing a large foue. of cavalry, ho is reported to have : " Perhaps" wo. made ;l mistake in failing to foresee during peace, all that our cavalry would now bo doing. Our cavalrv fought both with bayonet ami spade," but 1 hopft they may ajzain use tho saddle and lance, if, with tho help of God, who has already given us po many victories, we succeed in surrounding the onemv."

The Rome correspondent of tho 'Morning Post' states that Germany, alarmed hv the Russian successes, has made preliminary offers of peace to Russia. The Ens. sian Government, however, have rejected the overtures.

KING AND ARMY

MESSAGE TO CENERAL FRENCH

LONDON, November 11. ([Received Norember 12, at 8.30 a.m ) The King has sent the following Message to Sir John French:— The splendid pluck, spirit, and endurance my troops have shown in their desperate Tight for so many days against vastly superior forces fill me with admiration. I am confident as to the final results of their noble efforts undor your ablo command. Sir John French replied:

Your message was received by the army with feelings of deepest gratitude and pride.

HUNGARIAN CAVALRY

PARIS, November 11. (Received November 12, at 10.5 a.m.)

It is believed that the Hungariancavairy in Belgium have been almost annihilated. The two latest lists of casualties include. 867 Hungarian names of distinction.

TURKISH EQUIPMENT LOST.

LENT BY GERMANY. PETROGRAD, November 11. (Received November 12, at 9 a.m.) Tho cargo of the Turkish transports sunk by tho Russians at Zun.guJdi.ak (cabled on November 7) included artil lery, aeroplanes, automobiles, and uniforms for 60,000 troops. The Russians rescued 248 soldiers and several German officers.

TURKISH FEELING

OUTBURST AGAINST GERMANS,

ATHENS, November 11.

(Received November 12, at 10.5 a.m.)

It is reported that an extensive conspiracy has broken out in Constantinople against the Young Turks and Germans. Five of the ringleaders have been shot. On Sunday a crowd attacked some German non-commissioned officers. The German Consul has protested to the Government.

THE VICTORIA CROSS

FOR A TWICE-PROVED HERO,

LONDON, November 11. (Received November 12, at 9 a.m.)

Sergeant-major White, who carried Lieutenant Roberts (son of Lord Roberta), when mortally wounded at Colenso (in trying to save the guns), out of the danger zone, has been notified that h* ift

to receive tho Victoria Gross for gallantry at Le Cafceau. Sergeant-major White went back for his wounded captain. He placed the captain on his horse, and galloped safely through, though ho himself waa wounded in both legs. IN SOUTH AFRICA. JVEBEL REVERSES. CAPE TOWN, November 11. (Received November 12, at 9 a.m.) ' One hundred and twenty rebels were killed and wounded and twenty-five were taken prisoner in a- fierce, encounter with Colonel Kirk Van dcr Venten at Zand fontein, near Warmbuths. Twelve loyalists were killed and 11 wounded. Colonel Manie Botha, the well-known fighting commander in the Boer War, with 200 loyalists, dispersed 400 rebels outside Kroonstad. TSINC-TAO. HOW THE JAPS STORMED IT. A CHARACTERISTIC ASSAULT. TOKIO, November 11. (Received November 12, at 9 a.m.) The official account of the taking of Tsing-tao is couched in minkst teims. Nevertheless, it shows that the storming <if the fort was characte.iiscd by the same di'xczrd of life, whicii the Japanese showed in the Russian War. A detachment of engineers, who exploded the enemy's magazines, led the assault at heavy cost in lives. ; The Japanese mounted the parapets, amid a hail of bullets from magazine guns. and were blinded by fire shells which the enemy exploded to'reveal the position of the assai!ant6. Alter Fort. Moltke was taken the Japanese ordered a. halt, and thus deadly encounters in the. streets of the city were avoided. JAPANESE BOAT MINED IN KIAO-CHAU BAY. ' LONDON, November 11. (Received November 12, at 8.45 a.m.) A Japanese torpedo boat was while mine-sweeping in Kiao-chau Bay. l'ho majority of the crew were saved. SOME OF THE SPOILS. PEKING. November 11. ! (Received November 12, at 12.50 p.m.)- i The Japanese captur.vl a destroyer, two gunboats, and five, transports at Tsing-tao. They hope to raise the sunken Ka.ise.rin j Eliza bet Ji.. OPENING OF PARLIAMENT. THE SPEECH FROM THE THRONE. EMPIRE DETERMINKD TO TRIUMPH. LONDON, November 11. (Rereivcd November 12, at 8.45 a.m.) Many of the usual features were, absent j at the opening of Parliament. j Khuki-clad troops, including Tcrrito-j ria'ts, colonics, and Indians, linul the route, but the State, coach wab not used. The K:n»'s Speech was devoted exclusively t<« the war. particularly to Turkey's participation. It stated that, Great Britain strove, to preserve friendly neutrality, despite Turkev's repeated provocation ; but, bad counsel's and alien influences had driven Turkey into a policy of wanton aggression. "The Speech paid a tribute to the Army and Navy, aid alfo to the loyalty of j Mussulman subjects. It concluded with the statement: " The | whole Empire is determined to secure, at j whatever sacrifice, the triumph of our i atir.s and the vindication of our cause."

DISCUSSION IN PARLIAMENT

MR BONAR LAW'S CRITICISM

REPLY BY MR ASQUITH

MURE MEN NEEDED

THE PRESS CENSORSHIP,

LONDON. November 11. (Received November 12. at 12.30 p.m.) Speakiug in the House of Commons, Mr Bon.ir Lav." (Leader of tho Opposition) said we. had reason to be proud of outfinancial position. Economic pressure had already affected Germany, and it, was inconceivable what pressure would be experienced when the Germans realised they must be beaten. Some explanation was necessary why Mr Winston Churchill, and not Ix'i'il Kitchener, went to Antwerp in connection with what was a. military operation. Also, how the Germans were able to concentrate a superior force in the Pacific. He thought the Pre*--; was muzzled more than was necessary, and he suggested that a small eommitteo should consider a new seheme for soldiers' pen-

In re-ply, Mr A.-.-piit.h. said the rosponsibilify for the. Antwerp expedition lay with the. Government ;i,s a whole. They had witnessed tho solidarity of all parties in the United Kingdom, and had received a sympathy and support unpai.'illekd in history from rill quarters of tho globe. Our troops, in conjunction with our gallant Allies, had frustrated and defeated Germany's first The, Government intended to ask for a considerable vote, also for more men. The war might last a long time. but the Government doubk'd whether it would last ax long aa some people, originally predicted. Tho longer the war lasted the more would the Empire's great reserves of strength show themselves, and it would maintain its position until complete victory was achieved. In regard t-:> the. censorship, wo must act in conjunction with our Allies. The subject was one of military consideration.

THE CAPTURE OF THE EMOEN

MELBOURNE. November 12

(Received November 12. at 9.20 a.m.)

In the ]!ou;e <>i' Representatives Mr Fisher made ;i statement covering the facts already cm bled. He added thatCocos Ishnd had sent a. wirrJcfs message for help just, before the Germans destroyer] the installation, and this tho Sydney picked up. The Sydney was only recently out of dock, and therefore had the advantage of speed. The Prime Minister concluded by saying lie thought there was not a. soul iii Australia that, was not pleased that such an opportunity had arisen, and that such a fcucoess had been achieved by their own ship. The statement w.s pinctuated with frequent cheering.

DAMAGE TO THE CARL!

MELBOURNE, November 12 (Received November 12, at 9.20 a.m.)

The managei 1 of the Eastern Extension Cable in Sydney elates that ho understands, but ho cannot say for certain, that the cable was cut, but had been temporarily repaired. He was unable to say ■whether the damage prevented traffic going through Co:os, but messages had been, received from it. In any ease, the bulk of the traffic went by the other route via Darwin.

THE BRITISH WAY.

LONDON, November 11

(Received November 12, at 9.35 a.m.)

There is general satisfaction at the fact that the Emden's commander is unscathed.

.1 APANS CONGRATULATIONS.

LONDON, November 11

The Japanese Ambassador has telegraphed to Sir George H. Reid congratulating Australia on the destruction of the Emden.

WJaAT OUR ENEMIES WILL LEARN.

(London *,Time3 ' and Sydney ' Sun ' Sendees.)

LONDON, November 11. ' The Times' says editorially : "We are now only getting 'into our stride. Before the war is done our enemies wjll learn how inexhaustible is the might of tJbe Empire and her dsag&cn."

THE POPE'S INTENTIONS.

CLondon 'Times' and Sydney ' Si.n ' Services.)

LONDON, November 11

The Pope has expressed his intention of participating in the peace conference at the conclusion of the war, with a view to the transformation of the law of guarantees into an international agreement binding on all the Great Powers.

WOMEN AND DRINK

(London "limes' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.)

LONDON. November 11

The Homo Secretary (Mr M'Kenna) promised a deputation to consider the prohibition of the salo of liquor to women bofore midday. He said that since the war there ha<l been a reduction in the quantity of drinking throuchout Great Britain." but an increase among women. WOULD DIE TO THE LAST MAN. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) LONDON, November 11. Speaking at Glasgow, Mr T. P. O'Connor, M.I.V, said he was gratified to hear 5.000 Irish Nationalists in Glasgow singing the National Anthem for the first time, in their historv. It was another manifestation of the unity of tho Empire. Every Canadian, Australasian, and South African would die to the last man rather than exchange the free Flag of Encland for the militarist enslavement of Prussia.. GERMAN LOSSES IN EAST PRUSSIA. PKTROGRAD, November 11. (Received November 12, at 12.30 p.m.) The Germans in tho recent fighting in East Prussia lost. 70 per cent, of thei" officers. Tho Russians captured four howitzers, 62 guns, 60 machine guns, and immense quantities of ammunition, also 023 German officers.

AUSTRALIAN ITEMS.

THE EMDEN AFFAIR. SYDNi-A", November 12. ('Received November 12. at 10 a.m.) The Governor and Premier of New Zealand have pent congratulations on the Sydney's destruction of the Emden. BRISBANE, November 12. In the. Queensland Legislative Assembly the Premier's motion expressing satisfaction at, the immortal honor won by the Australian cruiser Sydney was'p.isfed with much enthusiasm. MILITARY SERVICE. MELBOURNE, November 12. Tho Federal House of Representatives passed a two million Supply Bill. An amending Defence hill lias boon introduced. Its provisions include one requiring all male inhabitants resident for six months in Australia to register their names for defence purposes.

STREET NOMENCLATURE'

MELBOURNE, November 12.

Some of the suburban councils are altering German-named streets to British. In one instance -Bismarck" street becomes "Kitchener" .street.

DUNEDIN WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION

SMOKERS' DAY

The smokers of Dunodin are asked to give to-morrow an amount equal to their ueekiv exp.'ndituio on tobaccr. and matches. This is little enough, surely, for the. stay-at-homes to contribute toward-, providing the men at the front with the luxury of a " real good smoke"' The ladies ask that the amounts be left at, oj sent to. the Early Settlers' flail during thj day. Boxes -in'which contributions may be' placed are to be left, at a number of tobacconists' shops, and will be available all day to-morro.v. The first donation to the. smokers' fund came to hand to-day in the shape of a cheque for £1 IPs fioni the smokers and non-smokers of Wcdclcrburn, per Mr Alex. M'Lenmm. Many busy helpers were at work with sewing machine or needle this morning, while "male assistants were busy packing and trucking eases to be sent away. Mrs C. Miller lias sent 10s for the British and Belgium fund, and "A Little Boy '" 5s for the patriotic fund. Hoods "" nil kinds continue to come in for the various fund*. PORT CHALMERS. A juvenile enteitainment of exceptional merit was well attended yesterday evening in the Foresters' Hall. the. entertainment was a. patriotic one. the proceeds to be used to supplement the goon work being done, by the local Ladies' Committee to succor ihe war waifs. The Port Chalmers Band turned out, and the public response, was so generous that the ball \>as filled and further admittance had to be refused The entertainment il-eif was a delight. It •was the operetta .' Ci-.sie in Toyland.' and the singe was a veritable fairyland. Dame Trott's village -cbooi was humorously represented. The costume- were specially prepared for the pi"c". mid the Queen of the Dolls, with hrr two little were vcrv eh.-mriiii.'. Santa Clans participated. The orchestra was L ;ood. The cnt--. tainmeut, which reflect; the greatest cred.t on Mrs .f. Morgan, who trained the children, will be repeated this evening.

HOT BAYONET WORK

BLACK WATCH CHARGE.

A private in the famous Black Watch—from which regiment Lieutenant Patrick Kin loch Campbell, of New Zealand, was gazetted as missing-—who was wounded at the battle of the Marne, and who is now at Notley, gives the following account of the fighting in a letter to a friend:

••' It was in tho battle of the Maine (hat T got bowled over, and a funny thin? about it is that I was homo in time to read the account of our great victory in the paper. My regiment was acting advance guard, and my company was well in advance, when we came to a hill covered with thick brushwood. Some French cavalry were sent out to do a bit of scoutin?:. 'They caine ba-ek and reported the hill clear. " Well, we continued our inarch along the road, but just as we came under the nill the Germans opened a terrible fire on us. The hill was entrenched from top to bottom, but tho trenches were well hidden m the hrti'b. The ib'st line was onlv about 90vds from us. and the first volley bowled 'over a lot of my company. There were also two companies of the Cnmerons attached to us. There was nothing for it but the bayonet, and before you could say ' .Tack Robinson ' we were in their first line of trenches. They ran like rabbits. Then we ccX reinforced by the remainder of the regiment, and the hill was taken."

TRIBUTE TO OUR DAUNTLESS READ.

SDIPLE, BUT TMPP.ESSIVI

At the opening of a patriotic entertainment list night at Port Chalmers a simple but impressive tribute was paid to the memory of those who have died for the Empire in the present war. The Mr.vor referred in appreciative terms to the splendid manner in which the glorious traditions of Britain's arms has been maintained on land and sea. Special icferenca was made to the dauntless British seamen in the naval battle off Valparaiso They never had a- fighting chance against larger ships and guns of greater calihre. but they never dreamed of declining battle. DauntJessly they steamed into the firing line, fought li'-c Britishers, and dit-d with honor. - The Mayor said ho regarded it as the mo<t stirring event of the war, and he asked the audience to stand in silence and thus record their heartfelt trihute tc- the Empire's honored dead. The hall was crowded, but the response was prompt and unanimous.

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Bibliographic details

IN THE BALANCE., Evening Star, Issue 15648, 12 November 1914

Word Count
3,332

IN THE BALANCE. Evening Star, Issue 15648, 12 November 1914

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