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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

"SCOTLAND FOR EVER."

Prew Association—By Telegraph—Copyright.

TAR IS. November 10.

Reinforcements continue to arrive to support the German right, and tho British in many positions are outnumbered by 10

to one. The Indians are fwhtine with an enthusiasm and dash which ' have electrified their British cnmpn.tiions. The Gurkhas at night continually discard their rifles. and. armed with kukries. creep from their trenches, signalling <>>" » system known onlv to themselves, and soundlessly killing the" German sentries, make openings for the British troops. Twenty Path.ins south of "Ypres. overpowered * the German sentries noiselessly, and then the rest nf the party crept forward and suddenly thin:: fireballs in th" air and dashed to the trenches. For 10 minutes the Pathnns hacked and slew the half-awake, wholly-bewildered Germans, who were sleeping" preparatory to a night attack on the "British trenches. Hand-to-hand fighting at Messines (between Ypres and Arment it-res) continues. The Scots Guards and Scots Greys brilliantly bore the burnt of several attacks. Onco a devastating shell tire raked the British lines, and retirement was imminent. When the shell tire ceased German masses were pushed forward to sweep tho trenches. The Scotsmen leapt out and awaited the charge. The conflict was short and sharp. The British lost heavily. but flung- back the enemy. A FRENCH EXPLOIT. PRUSSIAN REGIMENT ANNIHILATED. LONDON, November 10. Correspondents report that the Germans are making desperate efforts to pierce the allied line at Wameton, north-cast of Armentieres. Two French battalions on November 3 ambushed the Bth Regiment of Prussian Infantry, which was occupying a village five miles from Warneton. One regiment hid in tho wood during the night, and another crept up to a farm on the other side of the village and cut down a German batterv before it was able to tire a shot.

When the fog lifted the regiment in the wood dashed at the village. The Germans were surprised, but rallied. Then the second Tegiment appeared in their rear. Three hundred and tiftv Germans surrendered, and the rest were killed. Not a man escaped, and the. whole battery was captured.

THE FRENCH HEAVILY ENGAGED

BETWEEN ARRAS AND THE OISE

PARIS. November 10,

The high ground running from Arras to Roye (between Amiens and Laon) forms a sott of frontier between the armies. The French are content to repel attacks without attempting to seriously assail the strong line, of German positions in the higher hills to tho eastward. Occasion ally the French carry out victorious hand-to-nand encounters "at villages occupying strategical points. Arras, dominated by the German big guns thundering from the heights to noTth-east of the town, commands six highways strategically important to operations .northward. The Germans made desperate efforts recently to gain a foothold in the suburbs, and thero was determined house-to-house fighting day and night, but the French still hold the town. The Germans hold Bapaume and Peronne, and regularly bombard Albert, but the French, by a brilliant bayonet attack, captured Chaulnes (between Amiens and St. Quentin), and expelled the enemy between Chaulnes and Bapaume.

THE BELGIANS

EASE POSITION ON COAST.

LONDON, November 10.

A ' Dailv Chronicle' despatch says that advance Belgian patrols have penetrated to Ostend, thus relieving the coast line and covering Dunkirk, Nieuport, and Ostend from tho menace of the past two weeks.

ANOTHER BELGIAN MASSACRE,

ROULERS BURNT,

LONDON, November 10. A correspondent states that some French cavalry ambushed a party of Germans at haulers (north-east of Ypres). The Germans acusced the inhabitants of treachery »nd shot 43 civilians and burnt down many jouses, factories, and mills. They fined ihe town 100,000 francs, and when it was oaid the Germans doubled the fine.

jLondon ' Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.)

LONDON, November 10.

Prominent citizens of Roulers canvassed the town and succeeded in collecting the German fine of £4,000.

THE AVIATION BRANCH,

ALLIES WELL SERVED

SOAIE OF THEIR FEATS.

PARIS, November 10.

Official: Notebooks found on Germans prove that the Allies' aviators have produced a most startling effect. A French aviator struck a bivouac of fu'ards and killed eight men and eight orses, and wounded 32 men. Another aviator wounded 60 with a projectile. At Aubry a bomb killed 30, and a second projectile wounded 20. A bomb which burst in tho midst of a group of cavalrymen killed 30 men and 50 horses near Lille. The cavalry, which had been pursued the whole day, was finally prevented from carrying out its object by an aviator's bomb. The British aviators have been equally successful. These feats are all accomplished during salvos of grape-shot and shells.

The new arm has fulfilled its promise. It, does not replace any ancient arm. Cavalry must always reconnoitre and patrol, aud artillery open the way for infantry. while engineers must prepare tho ground for the latter. Finally, the infantry itself is still the main factor in a battle, and must take positions and pursue the enemy. KAISER'S MOVEMENTS.

LONDON, November 10.

The ' Daily Alan's' Copenhagen correspondent says that he hears from Berlin that preparations have been made at Potsdam for the Kaiser's return. It is rumored that it is the Emperor's intention to transfer bis headquarters from Northern France to Potsdam.

TRIVIAL INCIDENTS.

(London "Times' and Sydney 'Sun* Serriow.j

LONDON, November 10.

In the neighborhood of Vailly the trenches are so close that constant jokes are played by the rival armies. One of the latest was that in which a German had left his lines in search of milk at a farmhouse, and who hy mistake wandered into the French trenches. He was captured, detained all night, and sent back dressed in woman's clothes, but minus the milk.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141112.2.10.1

Bibliographic details

"SCOTLAND FOR EVER.", Issue 15648, 12 November 1914

Word Count
930

"SCOTLAND FOR EVER." Issue 15648, 12 November 1914

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