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Tress Association —3y Telegraph—Copyright,

across two miles of ground which was covered by the enemy'- shell fire. The, attack was successful, and the battery was silenced, although the French force was finally obliged to retire. The Allies only recovered this ground on Friday. A footing at last ON IMPORTANT POSITION. PARIS. November 9. i Received November 10. at 8.55 a.m.) Official: We liave reached the. plateau ot 3 rengy. north-east, of Soissnns. which had not previously been attempted. FRENCH PRAISE FOR- BRITISH TROOPS. HELD THE POST OF HONOR. PARIS. October 9. i Received November 10. at 8.30 a.m.) Several newspap.-is arc publishing a review r.f Dm .situation in France and Belgium, giving part it itl.n- prominence, to Britain’s share in the fighting. ' f.e Temps.' in ait article based on the statement of n ;■ iv-nch officer attached t-o (he Indian Hoops, pays a tribute to their heroism and powci- of re-i.-tance. The British forces, it says, had the post- of honor in the -•]iflictilt mist-ion of checkin; the new German invasion between La Basset* ami Yprcs. The British line waso thin that -tnle-s the Loops had shown an obstinacy went by of Waterloo it must have Isccn pier, cd or driven bark. This rni-'sion itece-sitatr’d holding the (rcnchiK for several weeks against, an enemy not only superior hi numbers, bni Bt la eking with desperate ics.-ilution. Someturns, especially at night, rime, the British trenches were carried, but (be .men spated no s.n-rifiocfi in retaking them. Tie* English cavalry weic perhaps most brilliant, of all. The German artilieiy on October 50 and 31 made a. special mark of tite cavalry then manning the freni-he*. believing them to lie inexperienced in infantiy work. Y’ct a. regiment of lancers, when ordered to eater Mpsmiios (five miles south of Ypres), and given bayonets for the lit si time, used them with (he vigor o; hardwir'd infanttymert, and cleared the town of the* enemy. The Indian tro ip.-, have aheady had their full -hare both of losses and of gloty. Soon alter landing they were thrown into Hi-- i-eitie of the furnace, and were fiercely- tried. Inn they emerged gloriously.

The BiiriHi hos.-s wore very heavy, but wctc insignificant compared with tlto.-e of the enemy. Several times, after a- night engagement. a single British battalion counted fiom 600 to 700 German corpsc11,*f,ire its trem-iies. One British artillery li.-rtety surprised a German brigade in ,*■!-i.e formal ion. and in a few minutes !n:i.-.-aned 4.000.

THE GERMAN DEAD

t REMATTGN REPLACING BURIAI

PARIS, November 9. i Rec eived November 10. at 8.35 a.iu.i

IHlht new spapcr? stale that. the. Germans 10.-t 50.0C0 killed last weak in the fighting on the Yser. Seme of the trains travellm-/ thi on l It;-u.-sels contain, thousands o! corptes roped together in fours around a pia.ak. and packer! upright in the trucks. These were burned in a special apparatus at Louvain. Titf>. Timit' German recruits arc insufficiently trained, tlw.iv shooting being appalling. but they know how to die. While their numbers can be maintained the on'inv's attack? arc not likely to 10.-c their vigor. THE BAVARIANS AM) Till: KAISER'S ROAST. LONDON", 'November 9. (Ketcived November 10, at 9.10 a.ni.) In view of the Kaiser'* wish that, the Ravarina troops might meet the British, prominence being given t.o the surrender of 150 Bavarians to, the British Last week: also to the. British victories in th ? Messine? region. Some 260 Bavarians have been sent to Germany for trial for icfufiing to fight the. British. VON MOLTKE. STOOD IN KAISERS WAV. LONDON. November 9. .'Received November 10. at 9.5 a.in.) '1 he ‘Standard’s' Copenhagen correspondent- states, that- Von Moltke's dismissal has l>?en officially announced. It was due to the Kaiser's desire for complete control. RUSSIAN SUCCESSES. URKAT ACHIEVEMENTS CLAIMED. STARTLING FIGURES.

LONDON. November 9 (Received November 10, at 9.5 a.rn.i

Reuter's Petrograd correspondent stales that about 10,000 of the best AnslroGerman cavalry lia.ve been wiped out in lighting or routed in pursuit. After destroying tho cavalry tho Russians cut off five opposing armies from their western base, and. forcing them southward, inflicted, severest losses, totalling 300,000 killed, wounded, and prisoners.*

GERMANS PUSHED BACK

OVER NORTHERN POLISH FRONTIER

PETROGRAD, November 9. (Received Noveoibe- 10. at 8.55 a.m.l All the German detachments on the Chorrelmlava - Rrpin front have been driven across the frontier. |The front mentioned lies between Lomza and Thorn.] .MANY .PRISONERS TAKEN. The High Commissioner reports, under date London, November 9: Official: The Russians report progress in East Prussia, gaining several fortified positions, and pressing on the enemy's rearguards. They have entered German territory near Kapisch. Twelve thousand prisoners were taken.

AN OMINOUS RETICENCE

LONDON, November 9.

(Received November 10, at 8.55 a.m.)

It, is noteworthy that the German and Austrian newspapers now make the briefest references to the fighting. The Austrian papers ignore the latest Russian victory.

TSING-TAO

GERMAN CHAGRIN,

AMSTERDAM. November 9. (Received November 10, at 9.10 a.m.) The German Press comment on the fall of Tsing-tao in the bitterest terms, blaming Great Britain. The ‘ Lokal Anzieger’ says that Germany will never cease to think of it till the time of reckoning conies.

progress

STEADY BUT SLOW

BETWEEN THE VSER AND THE Old I:

ENEMY STRUGGLE HARD

PARIS. November 9

(Received November 10. at 8.45 a.in.) A communique states; The Germans again assumed offensive from Dixmude to Vpres, but everywhere they were, repulsed. We progressed at almost all 1- obits, though between Dixmude and the River Lys our progress was slow, owing to the nature of the enemy’s new offensive and the .strength of iheir prepared defences.

Fog has been hampering mir operations, especially between the Lys and the Disc. We are maintaining progress on the Aisne. The German attacks against Sainte Marie distinctiv failed.

VPRES TO ARRAS

ENEMY WELL ENTRENCHED

PROLONGED EIGHT LIKELY

LONDON, November 9. (Received November 10. at 3.55 a.rn.j

Reuter's Paris correspondent has intimated that tin- German forces operating against Vpres are now about equal ti numbers to the Allies, and the lines of the opposing armies are unlikely to be modified for some clays and possibly for weeks. Anas is still Hie centre of severe fighting. At one time 4.900 shells were falling f>n the town hourly. The German held pieces are thrice the number of the French artillery. Tim allied advance on Lilie is slow, the Germans being strongly entrenched in that district. General Ayffle (?) does no! intend to capture (he town by a direct advance, as he wishes to spare Lille, which has already suffered tmm bombardment,

THAT DASH OX CALAIS

HAS IT FA ILL I) 7

\\ E. 1.1. I NGTON . November 10

Lite High Comniissioiter cables:—

As a result of the British resistance, the Germans are apparently preparing to retreat, indicating that their meditated dash on Calais is a failure, aithon,gh troops had been brought liom ihe ea-tern frontier to assist- in it.

A BRITISH ADVANCE

(HR NEAR BRUGES

ENEMY RETREATING

EASTWARD l-'RO.M vpres

BIT ENTRENCH f\'G NEAR Till

COAST

PARIS, November 9. Received November 10. at 8.55 a.m. t

An Am-lcrdani message state- that the Rl itmh patrol- have penelrated to within three miles of Bruges. Tiie Germans al night lime removed rii- ." heavy gimp from various siralogical I he British liave forced back' the Germans Ccitpulei’iih! v to the easlward of Ypics. iel I her,- i- , ~n-,-,,isns of military opinion that more British men and n-'ir-gnus are ner-iled. The Germans are Mill bringing no 1-,-iii ton emciits from Alsa-'-e. and thi'ciiten Hie British lino- with a mu(icndnns mass: of a nillmy. in Hie hope of penetrating to Vpres. am! lben.ee* through Huzebroie k to Calais.

Many lii/g guns have been nioniiied -at Heyst (on the Belgian coast, near t’ac tnouHi of ihe Scheldt J. concealed in sandbanks. Other hat (erics of field guns have been posted inland, indicating the enemy’s intention to cling to tiie few miles of ,oa?tl;ne between Zeehrugge and the Dnteh frontier. perhaps because, the Bruges. Hey-t canal is being used for the (ranspoi t of mines and of submarines in sections.

The German enDem-Tiing works extend to within 10 kilometres of the Dutch frontier. At that point the entrenchments face northwards, indicator:; that it is intended to i-heck the Allies if the latter work abac,' the sea- coast and then along the Diiic.ii frontier.

The Germans ai" work in;; with great cm-rcty upon the western forts of Antwerp. ami are also laying land-mines in that vicinity alone: an immense area. Three circles of trenches for infantry arc being prepared round the Antwerp forts. an air Kxrorvmi. PATHS. November 9. (Deceived November 10. at 0.5 a.rn.l Two 'British and two Drench aeroplanes at Ypres. in pursuing four Gorman machines. drove the latter into a. dangerous position. The Germans were brought down with shrapnel. TIID SC.'HKDDT I-iNTRANC'Ii.

STRUT PRECAUTIONS

AMSTERDAM. November 9. Received November 10, at 9.5 a.m.)

Tho Bmgomflslevat Flushing has issued a warning that, owing to the presence of unknown vessel? in the Scheldt at night time, all vessels except niailboats are liable to be tired on.

ALONG THE A ISX I

SODDEN ACTIVITY RECURS.

A BRILLIANT CIIARGI

RV BRITISH LANCERS

PARTS, November 9.

(Received November 10. at 8.35 a.m.)

Tbe newspapers lay stress on the unexpected renewal of lighting on the Aisne. 'there has been violent hglfAig around Rheiins since Saturday. The Germans have also renewed the. attack on Craonne, and have brought up several siege guns to bombard Boissons. They hrew 20,000 reinforcements against the Allies between Prave (? Braisne) and Vailly. During tho fighting at Vailly the British Lancers covered the left of the infantry. U was necessary to silence a battery of German guns. The lancers, in a night attack, charged by squadrons

HIGH COMMISSIONER'S CABLE

NEWS FROM SOUTH AFRICA

REBELLION PRACTICALLY QUELLED.

The Prime Minister inis received the following from the High Commissioner, dated London, November 9 : Official : There have been wholesale arrests of British civilians in Germany. The chief concentration camp is at (be Berlin racecourse. Germany has refused to the exchange of invalids with Great Britain. The Transvaal rebels, under General Beyers, crossed the Van! River, and 350 of them were- captured. The disunities were slight. Another lot were found in a dejected condition between Schweger Breke and Wolmaranssatad. Others crossed the Mafekiug-Kimberley line near Padino. and are bring pursued bv De Beer.

The rebels looted Hari'ismith. and were active in other places. The Government forces arc protecting the gasworks. They are using artillery, and arc perfectly able to deal with the situation. Commandant Mertz engaged Chris. Muller at the Albert silver mine, and took several prisoners. The police arc doing excellent work, ami as a result of their action the scattered rebels arc returning home. They said they were heartily sick of the whole business, and had been misled. A lengthy casualty b'«t was published to-day containing nearly 1.000 names. The casualties were rite results of the battles on the Franco-Belgian ground during September. A further £IOO.OOO rote is expected to ho asked for ihis week in Parliament-. An increase in soldiers’ pensions is also expected. AFTER THE GERMAN CRUISERS. THE LION ON THEIR TRAIL. NEW YORK. .November 9. (Received November 10. at 11.55 a in.) A squadron of British warships was Keen header! towards the Ran, Tina C anal. It is believed they are bound f->r South American walers. They were observed off the Bahamas. The guards wauling the i-.nial have been strengthened, in view of a reported Gel man plot to destroy the locks, by dynamite. BRITAIN WILL BEAR THE COST. CAIRO. November 9. fßo'-r-ived November 10. at- 10.30 a.m.) (Beat. Britain has announced that she will hear 1h« whoh- -I m the expense in the war with Turkey. THE KAISER DULL AND .MGRGSE. THE GHOSTS. THAT HAUNT r *!M. NEW YORK. November 9. ■ Received November 10, at 11.55 a.m.) A correspondent states that the Kaisers personal guards have been doubled. No stranger is allowed within revolver range. He is worried over the tremendous losses on the battlefield and the. deaths of scores < i personal friend.-. The Kaiser i- haggard and weary Ho dims at, the. mess niglrtiy. but j.-’dul!. morose, arid fretful. His animus against England amounts to obsession. He avoid.-- a bomb-proof field cottage, and prefers a tailway .deeping car. as it is safer than a stationary strnctin,-.

IN THE PERSIAN GULF

A SCI '(■]■>" El ’J. ACTION

WELLINGTON. November 10. The High Commissioner ippm-is nmh-r da:,* London. November 7: Official : Tin* commando nf rebel;, which was at Zmfipansdiin has been driven north into Watcrlic-i g. and is being pursued. TTk-v were seen ye-tnday at W.mnbatc-. evidently moving to- get Into the wooded nmth-western parte of that district. Yesterday a tebc’ emmando crossed the railway line at Bloemsoff, in the Western 'i':aii-v; al. Commandaiit 1 lolam- Swart came in coutful with i Item and <-apt.»red five. J .list niglit they .-mssed the Vanl into (tie, Oiailg** I: fee Mute, ( oioncl Eeti'c iimr following them.

la is rnmoicd (hj it a latger body, badiy mov-itcd ami said to L- lid by Kemp, are nteving down the Great Maria- River valley towards Yryburg. Their ol.jcet ive is sit si to be Genmin Sot,tli■ ac.-i Africa. Colonel AU.'crt-. win. 'e moving in tiie some direction, reported that, a body oi rebels under Gonrov blew up a bridge. ]),; U’ct, with large ;orct*v. is in ike neighborhood of Eimllev. Tie destroyed tbe railwav. and saves a I parts of Harrismith. w,ie entered ard looted by the rebels.

In tlu* southern pert ion of the Grange Free* Slats- and in other p ote < verytlvng is quiet. Yesterday Colonel Muntz stjcccssinily engaged a rebel commando tinder Chris Muller at North Bronkhoistepniit, Forty-four wounded were taken prisoners. The total number captured of Muller’s rnirmiando is 70. Tltrie. were a few casualties.

The High (■ommis.sio.uer reports under date, London. November 8 : Official : A successful operation against Fao 3l the mouth of the Shaft el Arab, on the Persian Gulf, was. conducted by the Indian military forces. Covered by the Odin, the armed la,nnch Sirdar, and a pinnace from the ocean marines and maxim guns. the. enemy's puna were silenced after an hour's resistance. The town is now occupied by our troops. There were no naval casualties, and it is e.vtiecieti there will he no further opposition below IT".

Till'. LOR I) MAYOR'S SHOW. LONDON. November 9. (Received November 10, at 11.25 a.in.) The Lord Mayor’* Show was shorn of Rs usual pageantry and confined to a military display. The, route was densely crowded. King Kdward's Horse and contingents ut Canadians and New Zealand--■•is' formed the Lord Mayor's escort, anti were enthusiastically cheered by the spectators. who also gave an ovation to the London Scottish Regiment, and C> the naval men who fought at Antwerp. THE KARLSRUHE'S YORK. ANOTHER, STEAMER MIXED.

LONDON. November 9. (Received November 10. at 11.25 a.in.) The crew of the Dutch steamer Marino have arrived at Plymouth. They report that the Karlsruhe sank the Marina, with a cargo of American wheat for Del fast. The Swedish steamer A:'-- was mined and sunk in the- North ><a. Si.v lives were lost. LABOR'S ENEMY. SVIINEV. Novemher 10. (Keceived November 10, at 10.50 a.in.l The Railway Workers ami General Laborers’ Association discussed the move merit not to work alongside Germany, and approved a resolution deploring the introduction of racial antagonism in the ranks of unionism, which was nothing more nor less than organised inhumanity enacted under the guise of patriotism, and declaring that the workers of Australia had no quarrel with the workers of Germany or anv other country, their Quarrel "being with the ruling classes.

WHAT THE NATION HAS GAINED

GREATER THAN BEFORE THE WAR

MELBOURNE, November 10,

(Received November 10, at 10.30 a.m.) At the Lord Mayor’s banquet the Go-vernor-General (Sir H. Munro-Ferguson) made a rousing speech on Britons’ doings in the war. *’ Wc. have lost men and lost ships, but wo have gained in prestige and are a greater nation to-day than when the war began. We no longer live on our past acTiiovements, but on those we are achieving ourselves. Peace is impossible until the weight of Germany, which ;s the sole warrant of her success, is broken. Until Germany has ceased to he a supreme power which no treaty and no international law ran bind, there, ran hr no peace nor till she re-enters the ranks of ordinary law-abiding nations.”

NO WET CANTEENS

SYDNEY, November 10.

(Received November 10, at 10.30 a.m.) Senator Pearce has decided to place Australian troopships on the same footing as those from New Zealand by abolishing wet canteens.

PREFERENCE TO THE ALLIES

SYDNEY’, November 10. (Received November 10, at 10.30 a.m.) The City Council Electric Lighting Committee adopted a recommendation to give preference to Great Britain and her Allies.

THE GRAVE-DIGGER

1 have been for many strange walks in my life with strange companions, tip and down the world, but never have i gone for such a tramp with such a guide as on tbit Sunday within sound of the guns. My comrade-of this day was an amateur gravedigger. His ordinary profession is that, of a " garde champotro,” or what we. should call, I tuipfose, a gamekeeper, but during the past three weeks he- has been busy with the spado-, which be carried acroc-s his. shoulder by my si-do With other peasants enrolled for the same, tragic task ne lias followed the line of battle for 20 kilometres from Ins own village. Rouvi'le, near Lovigncn helping to bury the French and English dean’, and helping to burn the German eorjwcs. Hit. work is not nearly done, for during the. fighting in the legion round the fores', of Yillet s-Col-tcrets. twice a, hatHefirid, as the Germans advanced and then retreated, first- pursuing and then pursued by the Ftcnc.lt and British, 5.000 Got man dead have lici'n left, upon the way and LOCO of mir allied 1 t-loops. Dig as hard as lie can my j iriendly gravedigger has been nmihio to j cover up all those bint who he nut in the 'wind .uul rain. 1 walked, i among tin; li-'-blo where, tiu-v lie ami anK«ng (hair roughly piled graves, and nut i far from (lie piles of the enemy’s dead who | are awaiting their funeral pyres. My | guide grasped my arm ami pointed to a i little dip in the. ground be-yori-1 the abandoned village of Levignen. " See, there-.” he said, “they take, some timo to burn.” ! He spoke in a matter-of-facl- way, like a. 1 gaidcner pointing to a. lonfire of autumn • '.eaves. - Philip GibKs. in the ’ Chionicje.’

NATIONAL RESERVE

TTmrc. is no sign of falling-off in numbers ot tho officers’ and non-coms. * class of instruction. La-t. night- close on 50 p.nadcd under Captain lln.-t-ey. and officers and non-coms, were given opportunities to exercise the, ri-m.iimk-r as a platoon and in extended oid, r work; Cumberland street, with the huge art lights elected by the City authorities for vii,• National Ri-,--t vc, making an ideal parade ground, (fii Thursday the various platoons wili parade unde]- their own officers, but Tlutrsdav of next w-'-ek will be devoted to eoniI any drill, when, if the weather and ground be good. the. wmk will he done on the Oval. The field work’ an ringed for Sunday next will take place- in the vicinity of Brighton, where good gionnd is avail able for the .-pedal work. Only officers and noii-coins, will take part cn this occasion, and they wili leave, the Triangle at, 10 a.m., the Slot or Reserve, being utilised i'-r trensport- r-.-rvl,,-. term ning to town

about 5 p.m. The Arthur Sired School Committee have kindly granted the use of tlmir hall to the Reserve for Thursday evejiinjrs, and No I City Company will use it this week for nr.i-H,xtrv tin-unction with titles lent by the Bovs' High School. At- the (ompany ‘Trill next- week th<- Motor Reserve will fall in wilh (he other platoons and be instructed in this work. '• NO TIME FOB GAMES.'' “ 1 rc-spcci. and honor yon limn* than I can say. My feeling towards you i- one. of intense admiral ion. How very diff-v----eni is your action from tit at of the r-ictt who can still go on wiiii their r.-ii actand football, a.s if the very ext-teuce of the count rv wt-rc not at stake. J 'vs is

not the lime to play games, wholesome as tlmy arc in days of piping peace. We arc encaged in a life-aml-death -t niggle, and .you tire showing your determination to (Jo your duty as soldiers, ami, by till menus in your power, to bring this war — a war forc'd upon us by an ambit mu- and unscrupulous milieu— to a smve-sriii result-. God bless and watch over you all.” Tb'-r-e etirriug words, v.-lm hj need to be taken to heart by the nation a.r large, were address'd by (Int veteran Field marshal Loid Roberts, hero of a hundred glorious (timpaigiw. to ,'he liiui of H/e ;x*u' (Tty Battalion of lie R0v.,1 Fusiliers, whom he inspected in the T-minle Gardens prior to ih*-’r l.ieiug sworn ,'n.

FIFTY AGAINST SIX THOUSAND. Among ttie soldiers mentioned In Grnera.l ■Toffre.’s order of the day figures Lieutenant Verliu. The part.ienlar feat, for which he has received honorable mention occurred during a recent fight in the, \alley of (he Oise. Lieutenant. Yerlin was engaged in re-.:'m-iiaissance. and was surrounded by the enemy. He managed, however, to rejoin his regiment, on the morrow, bsvim; lose two sergeants and .'7 men nut r.f 1. One of th-’, survivors of this adventure is now lying in hospital at a Paris suburban railway station, and given some account of it. The reconnaissance party were on-rating on the right l.ank of rhe Oise. Their members were, told that the Uhlans had be-n seen in the neighborhood, but there was no information about, thf-ir number or Die re.ad the\- lied followe,]. The lieutenant had derided (n c-.ntinue the reconnaissance, when the enemy were sightM iu considerable nmnbei«. Tie ordered his men. therefore, to rejoin tic- regiment as rapidly and s'.-rci!’' ...- possible. but. they were discovered. The section gained tl,c wood under the tire of the enemy, bn. without losing a single mini. They were then drulovtd at great intervals, and took any shelter they could find. When the enemy approached they were tonnd to number six to seven thousand. The lieutenant encouraged his men by going from one to the other, and ordered them to husband their ammunition. If the enemy had charged the wood the little party would have been annihilated, but- they were evidently deceiv'd by the way in whieh the fire was managed, file tiny force kept- their ground until midnight. At that moment- only 13 were in a condition to continue the fight. The lieuteua.nt addressed hi- men :—" Me* enfant?, we must leave at any cost-. Pease fire am! get on the road. Perhaps w- can get, awav ni the dark, as the Germans will not _ daw to venture into the wood." Before this retirement the Germans feared an ambush, and hesitated to advance, Iu that way the little party got away, and at. dawn reached their regiment, where the colonel embraced tlvurr. —■ The Times.’

The name of Major W. R. N. Madocks, of the Royal Artillery, appears in the li-.T of'wounded publisher] in the London ''limes' of September 21. Major Mndocks was formerly attached to the Defence Department in New Zealand, and with the first New Zealand ("online ml took part in (he Smith African War. afterwards serving on the Staff.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

Evening Star, Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
3,907

Evening Star Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Working